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WAKE FOREST COLLEGE 

THE Z. SMITH REYNOLDS LIBRARY 




CALL NO. 




ACCESSION NO. 
110301 



19a-1956 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 
in 2013 



http://archive.org/details/minutesofannuals4156litt 



AH 



MINUTES 

of the 

LiUle River Baptist 
Association 

NORTH CAROLINA 

SlKty-Sixth Annual Session 

Held With 

NeilS^s Creek Bapiist Church 

Near Angier, N. C. 

/ / 

October 28 and 29 

1941 

Leslie H. Campbell, Moderator _: Buie's Creek 

Sam F. Hudson, Vice-Moderator Lillington 

Waldo D. Early, Clerk-Treasurer Broadway 

The next Annual Session will be held with the Angier 
Baptist Church October 27, and 28, 1942 



MINUTES 

of the 

Little River Baptist 
Association 

NORTH CAROLINA 
SIxiy-Sixlh Annual Session 

Held With 

NelH's Creek Baptist Church 

Near Angier, N. C. 

October 28 and 29 
1941 

Leslie H. Campbell, Moderator Buie's Creek 

Sam F. Hudson, Vice-Moderator Lillington 

Waldo D. Early, Clerk-Treasurer __^ Broadway 

The next Annual Session will be held with the Angier 
Baptist Church October 27 and 28, 1942 



Little River Baptist Association 



Officers of Association 

Moderator L. H. Campbell, Buie's Creek 

Vice-Moderator Sam F. Hudson, Lillington 

Clerk-Treasurer Waldo D. Early, Broadway 

S. S. Supt. James H. Butler, Angier 

Training Union Director George W. Williams, Dunn 

Supt. to Promote Evangelism Chas. B. Howard, Buie's Creek 

Christian Literature Chairman Truby Powell, Lillington 

Orphanage Representative C. D. Bain, Dunn 

To Promote Missions Thomas W. Fryer, Dunn 

Temperance Chairman M. L. Skaggs, Buie's Creek 

Christian Education G. G. Grubb, Buie's Creek 

Hospital Representative A. W. Peede, Lillington 

Ministers' Annuity Chairman W. C. Stone, Erwin 

Note : The above Officers are m.ore than writers of re- 
ports to bring to the next Annual Session of the Little River. 
They are to do something to report. The Moderator has urged 
that each serve the full twelve months in the capacity to 
which you were elected, and then bring a report of what you 
hav led the churches to do, to the next Session. 

Associational W. M U. Officers 

Superintendent Mrs. C. B. Howard, Buie's Creek 

Assistant Supt. Mrs. J. A. McLeod, Dunn 

Sec. and Treas. Mrs. L. H. Campbell, Buie's Creek 

Stewardship Chairman Miss Lillian Draughon, Dunn 

Personal Service Chairman ._ Mrs. W. D. Early, Broadway 

Margaret Fund Mrs. J. H. Butler, Angier 

Training School Mrs. C. K. Smith, Chalybeate Springs 

Mission Study Mrs. R. F. Hall, Lillington 

Literature Mrs. J. G. Layton, Lillington 

Young Peoples' Leader Mrs. T. W, Fryer, Dunn 

Associational Training Union Officers 

Director George W. Williams, Dunn 

Associate Director Truby A. Powell, Lillington 

Secretary-Treas. Miss Mamie Haigwood, Lillington 

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Little River Baptist Association 



Pastor-Advisor Rev. Sam F. Hudson, Lillington 

Pianist Mrs. S. F. Hudson, Lillington 

Chorister A. E. Lynch, Buie's Creek 

Adult Leader Miss Lillian Draughon, Dunn, R. 6 

Young Peoples Leader __ Mrs. Ford A. Burns, Fuquay Springs 

Intermediate Leader Mrs. E. L. Powell, Mamers 

Junior Leader Miss Bessie McNeill, Broadway 

Story Hour Leader Miss Frances Byrd, Buie's Creek 

Eastern Group Leader Miss Egetta Williams, Angier 

Central Group Leader Miss Ophelia Matthews, Kipling 

Western Group Leader Miss Edith Knight, Broadway 

Publicity Director Hoover Adams, Dunn 

Executive-Promotion Committee made up of one member from 
each church with all pastors and Associational officers as 
members Ex-officio. 

ANGIER— C. W. Flowers Angier 

ANTIOCH— J. C. Bullock Lillington, Rt. 3 

BAPTIST CHAPEL— J. R. Howard Jonesboro, Rt. 2 

BAPTIST GROVE— Veldon Sexton Fuquay Springs, Rt. 1 

BETHEL— W. G. Elmore Manchester 

BROADWAY— Earl Wishart Broadway 

BUIE'S CREEK— Mrs. Alton Johnson Buie's Creek 

CHALYBEATE SPRINGS— Mrs. Richard Connor Kipling 

COATS— Owen Odum Coats 

CUMBERLAND UNION— John Sears Fuquay Springs 

DUNN— C. D. Bain Dunn 

ERWIN, FIRST— Ralph Holt Erwin 

EAST ERWIN— Mrs. C. M. Baker Erwin 

FRIENDSHIP— Mrs. B. F. Parker Erwin 

HARMONY— Miss Georgia Wilkins Lillington 

HOLLY SPRINGS— B. B. Wilson Broadway 

KENNEBEC— M. T. Olive Willow Springs 

LAYTON'S CHAPEL— E. L. Hill Bunn Level, Rt. 1 

LILLINGTON— Mrs. J. G. Layton Lillington 

MACEDONIA— J. C. Smith Holly Springs 

NEILL'S CREEK— Allen Matthews Angier, Rt. 2 

OAK GROVE— A. S. Lamm Buie's Creek 



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110301 



Little River Baptist Association 



PINEY GROVE— I. L. Howell Varina 

PLEASANT MEMORY— H. C. Ousley Lillington 

RAWLS — Miss Beatrice Rawls Fuquay Springs, Rt. 1 

SWANN STATION— A. R. Batchelor Olivia 

Associational Presbytery 

L. H. Campbell, T. W. Fryer, Scott Turner, Chas. B. Howard and 
Pastor of the Candidate 

Associational Executive Committee 

L. H. Campbell, S. F. Hudson, Waldo D. Early 

Note: This Committee is authorived by the Association to work 
out plans for financing and promoting the Summer Work, 
or for a full time Paid Worker if it seems probable to sup- 
port one. 



[4] 



Little River Baptist Association 



Proceedings 

The Sixty-sixth annual session of the Little River Bap- 
tist Association met with the Neill's Creek Baptist Church, near 
Angier, on Tuesday morning October 28, for the purpose of 
worship, fellowship, hearing of reports of work done during 
the year, and planning for work for the succeeding years. 

Moderator L. H. Campbell called the body to order by 
requesting that we sing "Praise God from Whom All Blessings 
Flow." James H. Butler offered prayer. 

Theme: The Local Church 

The congregation sang "Savior Like a Shepherd Lead Us." 
M. L. Hux led the morning Devotional, reading from Acts 2 
and speaking from the subject: Christian Fellowship in the 
local church. 

Ford A. Burns, Pastor of the host church, extended a glad 
hand of welcome to the Association and spoke briefly of the 
historical significance of Neill's Creek Church, she being the 
mother church of several of the other churches of this imme- 
diate secton. 

Song — Blest be The Tie, by congregation. 

R. F. Hall, serving as clerk, called the roll of churches. 
During the two day session every church was represented by 
delegates, letter, and fund for minutes. 

Messengers were enrolled, and members of churches who 
were not elected as Messengers as well as visitors out- 
side of the Association were welcomed. Among the visitors 
recognized were E. L Olive of Wake Forest, J. J. Adams of 
Southport, Mrs. W. L. Holliman, Mrs. Davis of Middlesex. 
Mr. Ballentine and Mrs. Holland. 

Acting Clerk R. F. Hall called for organization of the body 
at this time. 

The following organization was effected: 

Moderator, Leslie H. Campbell; Vice-Moderator Sam F. 
Hudson; Clerk and Treasurer, Waldo D. Early. A fee of $35.00 
was voted for the Clerk. 

On motion the suggested program was adopted. 

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Little River Baptist Association 



Vice-moderator Hudson was called to the chair while 
Moderator Campbell addressed the body. An able report of 
work done and an aggressive program for the future was out- 
lined by the speaker. 

In the absence of Mr. Powell, his report was read by his 
pastor, Sam F. Hudson. 

E. I. Olive of Wake Forest and a former pastor in this As- 
sociation spoke to the report in addressing the Association on 
Religious Literature. The Report was adopted. 

REPORT ON CHRISTIAN LITERATURE 

In my efforts to encourage good reading in our Association I 
have been made to realize some unpleasant facts. 

1. In some of our churches I find that there is not a single mem- 
ber permitting any form of Christian literature to enter their home 
except the Sunday School Quarterlies. 

2. For the most part our church members spend three to four 
times as much for secular literature as they do for Christian litera- 
ture, 

3. Not all of our Pastors are enthusiastic over the idea of pro- 
moting good reading in their churches. 

4. Many of our church members plead poverty v^hen ap- 
proached for a subscription to some Christian paper or Magazine. 
I approached one man about the Biblical Recorder, and as he was 
telling me that he v^as not financially able to subscribe, his wife 
called him suggesting that they go to a show; he consented without 
any hesitation — able to pay sixty cents to see a show, but offered 
excuses a long time before he gave me his subscription to the Re- 
corder! 

First of all we should place the inspired Word of God as our 
foundation on v^hich to build all our reading program. First on 
every Christian's daily schedule should come the reading of a passage 
of Scripture, coupled with prayer and meditation. The Systematic 
Readings offered in the Sunday School and Training Union Quarter- 
lies, are a good guide here. Follow them. 

A suggested reading list of helpful periodicals follows: 

Charity and Children, Window of Y. W. A., World Comrades, 
The Commission, Home Missions, and all the periodicals of the Sun- 
day School Board. 

The Biblical Recorder is reaching more homes in our Associa- 
tion, with its loving ministry than ever before. We now have 16 
churches with Recorder Clubs with approximately 275 subscribers. 

TRUBY A. POWELL 



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Little River Baptist Association 



Report on Minister's Retirement Plan — C. D. Bain. 
REPORT ON MINISTERS' RETIREMENT PLAN 

We are in the midst of a great social and economic movement 
looking to the welfare and well-being of all the workers of our na- 
tion. Today, over sixty nations have already entered the social se- 
curity field. Southern Baptists and other religious bodies preceded 
the Federal Government by many years in the understanding of the 
social teachings of Jesus. We are grateful for Social Security in our 
nation but our churches cannot receive it without compromising their 
principles for that would mean taxes levied by the government on 
the churches and churches paying taxes to the government. 

Our churches are coming to have a new conviction as to their 
responsibility for their ministers — "Even so hath the Lord ordained 
that they which preach the gospel should live of the gospel — and 
a new conception that adequate support means life support just as 
the call to the ministry is for life tenure. More than 6,500 churches 
of the Southern Baptist Convention are cooperating in the Ministers' 
Retirement Plan of the Relief and Annuity Board as a means of 
carrying out this conviction. 

This whole plan is merely a common-sense way of creating a 
fund in advance so that when a pastor becomes disabled or reaches 
the retirement age, which is sixty-five, he may retire knowing that 
an annuity has been built up for him. The Plan is not so much de- 
signed to lay up money against a rainy day as it is to lay up some- 
thing against that certain day that every man and woman must come 
to, the age of sixty-five. 

To be sure it costs something to build up such a fund. We can- 
not take out something we do not put in. The plan after all is very 
simple. A pastor pays into the fund either 4%, or 3%, or 2% of 
the salary received from the church or churches; then the church 
served pays into the fund an amount equal to the amount paid by 
the pastor. This money, together with the amount put in by the 
Convention, begins to draw interest upon investment and thus the 
fund is increased. This fund provides a retirement income for 
the minister at the age of sixty-five or upon total disability from 
disease or accident. The Baptist State Convention, under the wise 
leadership of Secretary M. A. Huggins, E. Norfleet Gardner and 
others, spent much time in trying to work out the Plan, and we 
believe it is in all respects safe and sound. In North Carolina about 
325 pastors and employees have become members. In the Little 
River Association only three pastors are members at present. 

Why Every Pastor Should Participate in the Plan 

1. It links him up early in life with a definite and business-like 

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Little River Baptist Association 



program designed to provide daily bread' after all other regular 
income is cut off. 

2. It frees his mind from, many anxieties and enables him to do 
greater work now; he does not cripple his ministry by being com- 
pelled to turn to secular pursuits but is free to give his whole life 
to the Gospel on assurance that he will receive his whole living 
from the Gospel. 

3. It places his influence and the influence of the church to 
help, not only himself, but every affiliated pastor in the Southern 
Baptist Convention to be protected by an annuity. 

4. It places him in cooperation with one of the greatest de- 
nominational enterprises of the past fifty years and will help South- 
ern Baptists to demonstrate their ability to solve their own social 
security problems. 

What Every Church Should Do about the Plan 
Inasmuch as God has commanded that his prophets be sustained 
and inasmuch as the Ministers' Retirement Plan is the most practical 
method yet devised to complete or carry out that command, we call 
upon able and loyal deacons and other church leaders to inform and 
lead your churches to participate in this Christian cause. Pastors 
may be hesitant to suggest the plan, though they should not be. Take 
this important and urgent matter to your churches for immediate 
and favorable action. For application blanks or further information, 
write Secretary M. A. Huggins, Raleigh. Let's make the Plan 100% 
effective in our association for next year. 

C. D. BAIN 

The Report was spoken to by C. D. Bain and Moderator 
Campbell. Report adopted. 

The host pastor made announcement urging everyone to 
remain for lunch after adjournment. 

The hour for the sermon having arrived, the congrega- 
tion sang Come Thou Almighty King. T. W. Fryer read Eze- 
kiel 37:1-10 and preached the Associational Sermon. After 
Benediction by Sam F. Hudson, the session adjourned for 
lunch. 

Tuesday Afternoon Session 

Session opened by Singing of Hymn "I Need Thee Every 
Hour" Forest Young led in prayer. 

Announcement was made by Joel G. Layton that he was 
offering to help certain churches to have Recorder and Chari- 
ty and Children Clubs. 

Report on Orphanage — W. C. Stone. 



[8] 



Little River Baptist Association 



V 



REPORT ON THE BAPTIST ORPHANAGE OF NORTH CAROLINA 

In making this report I realize it will be impossible to record 
the whole story of physical, social and spiritual need which comes 
to those who have charge of the helpless children, deprived of the 
loving care of parents. We believe that our orphanage, through the 
untiring efforts of our faithful Superintendent, Dr. I. G. Greer, and 
his staff of co-workers, is supplying this need in the best way 
possible. 

There are three classes of children being cared for by the 
orphanage, full orphan, half orphan, and victims of desertion and 
wrecked homes. This service is being rendered through Mother's 
Aid, boarding homes, and the orphanage proper. In addition to this 
the orphanage authorities are rendering a fine service by helping 
children and parents make adjustments with neighbors and relatives. 

In spite of the fact that the government is doing much for child 
welfare the orphanage is receiving greater demands than ever before. 
They receive upon an average forty-five applications each month. No 
matter how urgent the demand may be the policy of the orphanage 
is not to make special appeals. They depend entirely upon the once 
a month collection in Sunday Schools and the Thanksgiving offering. 
The cost of running the Orphanage is $500 a day. This constant 
stream of human need must go on, day after day and year after 
year until the purpose of Christ, through His church, has been ful- 
filled. This places a special responsibility upon all Christians, who 
have become members of His Church to do their duty toward this 
worthy cause. We believe if this matter were laid on the hearts of 
our people regularly each month they would respond. 

We therefore recommend that this Association name an orphan- 
age representative, who will see that a representative is named in 
every church to keep this cause before the people once a month and 
at Thanksgiving. Let each of us pledge ourselves, as servants of the 
Lord Jesus, to do our part to answer our prayer "Give us this day 
our daily bread." For the only way He can give the children their 
bread is through us. 

As messengers let us go back to our churches determined to do 
our part and to lead each member of our church to do his part in 
caring for the children God has entrusted to us, remembering the 
promise: "Inasmuch as ye do it unto one of the least of these ye do 
it unto me." 

Respectfully submitted, 
W. C. STONE 

Supt. I. G. Greer of Thomasville addressed the body on 
the work of the Orphanage. Upon motion the orphanage re- 
port was adopted. 



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Little River Baptist Association 



O. T. Binkley addressed the Association on the theme 
"Religion in the Home." 

Report on Hospital — Miss Mattie Bain. 

REPORT ON BAPTIST HOSPITAL 

The Baptist Hospital is just now completing additions to its 
plant that increases its bed capacity from 108 to 300. This will en- 
able the hospital to treat 10,000 patients each year. Of this number, 
we may expect 3,300 of them will be service patients; that is, not 
able to pay a hospital bill. 3,300 will be mothers who have waiting 
for their return home 10,000 children. If the present rate is main- 
tained, 200 will be preachers for whom no charge has been made for 
the last two years or more. 

The hospital has a staff of 100 doctors: these are all specialists 
in the many fields of medicine and surgery. 

The hospital runs a well-equipped standard Training School for 
Nurses. These are taken from as nearly every section of the state 
as possible. A class of about 50 will be taken each year, making a 
school of 150. 

The Medical Building of the Bowman Gray School of Medicine 
of Wake Forest College is now completed and the school opened the 
first of September of this year. While the Medical School and the 
Hospital will be closely related and mutually helpful in every de- 
partment, they will remain separate institutions, controlled by sepa- 
rate Boards of Directors and supported from different sources. 

Everything contributed to the hospital goes to the support of the 
hospital exclusively. The Mother's Day Offering by the churches is 
used entirely for the services of patients not financially able to pay 
for treatment. 

The spiritual side of the hospital's service is stressed always. 
The Hospital has a fultime pastor supplied by the generous donation 
of Mr. C. M. Scott of High Point. This pastor, Rev. Charles E. 
Parker, in addition to his many activities with the patients and their 
families and friends, teaches a course in Bible in the Nurses Train- 
ing School. 

The various organizations of our women and young people are 
rendering a vast service to the hospital in supplying linens of all 
kinds — such as sheets, pillow cases ,towels, washcloths, etc. 

Our vastly enlarged program, of course, will require increased 
support. 

C. E. Parker, Hospital Pastor, spoke to the report. Re-^ 
port adopted. 

Report on American Bible Society — G. G. Page. 

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Little River Baptist Association 



REPORT ON AMERICAN BIBLE SOCIETY 

The American Bible Society of New York has just rounded out 
125 years of service as a non-profit missionary enterprise. It is de- 
voted to the translation, publication and distribution of the Word 
of God without note or comment. 

One third of the cost of this work is derived from the sale of 
Bibles, Testaments and Portions. The balance of the cost of produc- 
tion as well as the salaries of 465 full time and 1800 part time work- 
ers has to be had from the freewill offerings of the 38 religious de- 
nominations that support the enterprise. 

Of the 2751 written languages now spoken among the nations 
of the earth only 1051 have any part of the Holy Scriptures. More 
than three-fifths of the languages are yet to be reached. Since near- 
ly all the similar Societies of the Eastern Hemisphere have been put 
practically out of business by the present war the burden is growing 
incrasingly heavy on the American Bible Society. 

In 1939 Southern Baptist mission work in the Latin American 
countries was given $5,109.00 in subsidies, salaries and commissions 
in Bible distribution while we paid into the American Bible So- 
ciety only $671.00. This was about 20 cents per 1000 members and 
the lowest paid by anyone of the 38 contributing religious bodies. 
Next above us came the Negro Methodist with 31 cents per thousand 
members. Topping the list was a branch of the Presbyterians with 
a per thousand average $128.45. 

These are some of the facts that led North Carolina Baptists in 
Convention at Charlotte last year to pass the following resolution: 

"We are in hearty accord with the work of the American Bible 
Society, and we commend the appeal to the churches that this in- 
terest be placed in the benevolent budget of the local churches. To 
this end we approve the suggestions that the Moderators of the Dis- 
trict Associations utilize literature to be furnished by the Society 
urging the churches to make an annual offering to the American 
Bible Society." 

Since the resolution was passed world war conditions have in- 
creased and intensified the importance of action by our Southern 
Baptist people. A Bible blackout in the entire East is severely 
threatened, and the chaplains in the armies and navies, and prison 
and detention camps, are calling for ever-increasing help in supply- 
ing Bibles, Testaments and Portions. 

We urge that the churches in the Little River Association shall 
consider this matter in all seriousness and that each give it support. 
Let's fall in line with all North Carolina Baptists as expressed in 
the above resolution and include the American Bible Society in our 
church budget. If any church elects not to support it this way let 
us urge that such a church take an offering for the cause.. December 



[11] 



Little River Baptist Association 



14 is designated as Universal Bible Sunday. This will be a fine time 
to present the matter in the churches. 

Respectfully submitted, 
G. G. Page 

The Moderator named the following committees: 

Organization— S. F. Hudson, M. L. Hux, Mrs. C. D. Bain. 

Time, Place and Preacher — Scott Turner, Mrs. J. G. Layton, 
Mrs. W. P. Surles. 

Program for next Session — Owen Odum, W. D. Early, J. H. 
Butler. 

Resolutions— R. F. Hall, Mrs. W. D. Early, H. Y. Smith. 

After announcements, upon motion the Association ad- 
journed with prayer led by R. F. Hall. 

Tuesday Night Session 

Hymn: Jesus Paid it all. 
Devotional— G. G. Grubb. 

Speaking from John 14:26 the speaker had as his subject 
*The teaching Mission of the Local Church." 

Report on the Bible School — James H. Butler. 

REPORT OF SUNDAY SCHOOL WORK 

Believing that trained workers are essential to the progress of 
our Sunday School work in this association and in our Southland, 
our Sunday School Board has urged us to try to have a training 
school in every church. For the first eight months of this year or 
until August, we, in the Little River Association, had had only eight 
churches having training schools with a total of 62 awards. Our 
goal for awards was 500. We set as a goal 29 Vacation Bible Schools 
and reached 29. The credit for this is due to our fine associational 
worker. Miss Zula Rogers, who worked untiringly during the sum- 
mer. The goal for church libraries was 10. 

Next spring Mr. L. L. Morgan is planning to be with us for 
an Associational-wide training campaign. This is a Herculean task 
calling for at least 50 letters asking for helpers in this undertaking. 
It will cost the State Convention money, which it is glad to spend 
in a worthy cause, but it will be an expense nonetheless. Your 
superintendent here and now urges you to be planning for this event. 
At an early date we want all pastors and superintendents of the 
association to come to Lillington for an evening when we shall plan 
with Mr. Morgan a tentative outline of this work. He and the sup- 
erintendent will go to all churches before the campaign and see if 

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Little River Baptist Association 



proper preparation has been made. This will help our Sunday 
School enrolment if we give it our whole-hearted support. 
Respectfully submitted, 
JAMES H. BUTLER 

The Report was discussed by the writer, H. Y. Smith, S. 
F. Hudson, W. C. Stone and Miss Zula Rogers. Report adopted. 
Training Union Report — Waldo D. Early 

BAPTIST TRAINING UNION REPORT 

With grateful hearts we record some progress made in the 
Training Union work in the Little River during the year. With 
anxious expectation we urge you to press on until all of our people 
in all of our churches at least have an opportunity to get into train- 
ing for service. 

Some of the accomplishments for the year are: 

Our Annual Meeting at Neils Creek a year ago. This was a 
good meeting with a splendid program. A complete set of Asso- 
ciational Officers was elected to serve for the year. 

At the Regional meeting in Dunn we had delegates to enter 
each of the contests sponsored by the State and Southwide Training 
Union. We were especially proud to have three of our Junior Con- 
testants to go on and win in the State Contest held at Ridgecrest 
in July. The three made perfect scores in the Junior Memory Drill 
work and were declared winners along with some twenty others who 
made perfect scores. These three were Elsie McNeil, Celia Jane Early 
and Dwight Early, all of Holly Springs Church. 

In April an interested group met at Buies Creek for the day 
Associational Conference. Brother Hearn of Nashville and others 
from our own State led us in a thorough discussion of Associational 
work. The Buies Creek Church gave supper to the nearly 100 rep- 
resentatives present, and all together we felt that the meeting was 
indeed a good meeting. 

We of the B. T. U. Department want to especially express our 
appreciation to Miss Rogers for her help in the work, as our special 
summer worker. New Unions were organized in Churches. Study 
Courses held. New zeal and determination all along the line. 

We recommend, with the Association's approval, that a table 
be placed in the minutes to indicate the work of the B. T. U. This 
will assist workers through the year in keeping in touch with all 
the work in each church. 

As for work done in the Unions during the year we have the 
lollowing: There are 14 churches and one College Department 
which report 55 Training Union units. 

With this report and the installing of your new Director, the 

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Little River Baptist Association 



work of the present Director comes to a close. I shall give him or 
her my hearty cooperation. Won't you do as much? 
Respectfully submitted, 
WALDO D. EARLY 

After being discussed by the writer, T. W. Fryer, S. F. 
Hudson, C. W. Flowers, and Mrs. Ford A. Burns, the report 
was adopted. 

At this time a very fine paper was read by M. L. Skaggs. 
His theme was The Christian College. Others making re- 
marks on the subject were R. F. Hall and L. H. Campbell. The 
report was adopted but not prepared for publication in the 
Minutes. 

After announcements by the Moderator the session ad- 
journed being dismissed with prayer led by R. L. Poplin. 

Wednesday Morning Session 

Session opened with singing "Guide me O Thou Great 
Jehovah" and "Come Thou Fount." 

R. E. Atkins led the Devotional using Acts 2:41-47 and 
speaking on the Theme "The Local Church Winning The 
Lost." V 

Upon motion R. H. Satterfield spoke on The Recorder 
briefly. 

Report on W. M. U. The report was read by Mrs. S. D. 
Whittenton. Her Pastor, Mr. Fryer led a prayer of Thanks- 
giving for the work of the women in our Association. The 
report was adopted by a standing vote. 

W. M. U. REPORT TO LITTLE RIVER ASSOCIATION 
NeilVs Creek Church — 1941 

For more than fifty years the vs^omen of the Southern Baptist 
convention have chosen to serve Him through the combined efforts 
and gifts of the "Little Missionary Societies," and to direct the Mis- 
sionary Education of our Baptist Women and Young People. 

The Little River Association may well be proud of the report of 
the W. M. U. Our v^ork as a v^hole has progressed steadily. It is 
hard to measure spiritual values in material terms and say in a 
report just hov^ far reaching our efforts have been. There are 
eighteen Missionary Societies, not all of these have organizations for 

[14] 



Little River Baptist Association 



the Young People, but they do see the need of such organizations and 
with some encouragement they may organize these societies soon. 

There are fifty- two organizations for the Young People, 12 of 
these are for the Young Boys of the churches. However, there should 
be 12 more. We are letting an opportunity pass when we do not 
develop the Missionary Education of the Young Boys, who will be 
the deacons, teachers, and laymen in our churches of tomorrow. 

There have been fifty-one Mission Study classes reported for this 
year. Most of the Societies have observed the Special Seasons of 
Prayer for Home, State, and Foreign Missions. 

There are 120 Tithers of the W. M. U. reported, though I am 
;sure there are many others who tithe in the W. M. U. of Little River. 

We have 46 memberships to the Hundred Thousand Club. Our 
gifts to the cooperative program for this year have been $1926.88. 
We expect to reach our goal of 2620.37. 

There are some facts that make us realize we are not doing our 
best, in our efforts to speed the gospel to all the world. There are 
more than half of our Women and Young People unenlisted in Serv- 
ice. We need leaders for these hundreds who are receiving little, 
or no definite Missionary training in our churches. Let us thank 
'God for work to be done, and for the strength to do it. For our gains, 
let us praise Him, and for the tasks that lie ahead, let us ask His 
Guidance so that we may be true laborers together with God in our 
local churches. 

Respectfully submitted, 

MRS. DEWEY WHITTENTON 

Miss Zula Rogers, special Associational worker presented 
A challenging report, using Associational charts and maps to 
make the report vivid. Upon motion the report was adopted. 

REPORT OF LITTLE RIVER ASSOCIATIONAL WORKERS— 1941 

Vacation Bible Schools 

Number of churches in the association 26 

Number of churches having a school 26 

Number of schools held in Mission Study Schools 2 

Total number of schools held in the association 28 

Total enrolment 2125 

Total average attendance 1385 

Total number of conversions reported 41 

Total schools in which associational worker worked 13 

Other schools visited 5 

Sunday School 

Teacher Training classes taught by worker 3 

Others sponsored 6 



[15] 



Little River Baptist Association 



Baptist Training Union 

Unions organized or reorganized (3 by Rev. & Mrs. Early) 9 

Demonstrational programs given 3- 

Woman's Missionary Union 

Mission classes taught by worker 6' 

Demonstrational programs given 3. 

Societies organized or reorganized 3 

Societies visited — .. 7 

Churches visited once or more during revival services 8 

Letters v^ritten 23 

Cards written '. 78 

Phone calls 39 

Homes visited 193 

Visits to homes 261 

Talks made 37 

Bible school programs sponsored 15 

Other programs sponsored 12 

Census taken 2 

Church officers interview 196 

Visits made to churches by Campbell College students 14 

Campbell College students used in programs 12 

Others used in programs 40 

Names of people who gave one or more weeks in Bible School or 
Study Course work in neighboring churches: 
Miss Edna Mae Powell Mrs. E. L. Powell 

Miss Virginia Womble Miss Lucy Hudson 

Miss Annie Hall Wilkins Miss Doris Morgan 

Mrs. Irvin Stephens Mrs. D. Osee Rogers 

Mrs. Waldo Early Miss Rebecca Mannes 

Miss Gladys Terry Miss Irene Mannes 

Mrs. A. S. Lamn Rev. James Butler 

Miss Egetta Williams Rev. Jack Memory 

Miss Doris Hollowell Rev. Ralph Moore 

Respectfully submitted, 

ZULA ROGERS, Associational Worker 

Upon suggestion of R. H. Satterfield it was voted to au- 
thorize the printing of this report in the Biblical Recorder, 

Report on the State of the Churches was read by Scott 
Turner. Report adopted. 

REPORT ON STATE AND CONDITION OF THE CHURCHES 

There are twenty-six churches in the Little River Association^ 
twenty-five of these presented letters at the first day's meetings 
From the reports they presented we find the following facts. 



[16] 



Little River Baptist Association 



Number of members 6873 

Number of baptisms 249 

Total additions 465 

Losses in memberships 645 

Net loss during year 180 

The report of the Sunday School chairman for the association 
also showed a loss in enrollment. 

Total local contributions $34,473.41 

Total denominational contributions $12,909.68 

That is an average gift to all the purposes of our denomination 
of $1.87 per year, or a fraction over half a cent a day per member. 

Two churches reported no baptisms. 

One church reported no additions. 

Seven churches reported a loss in membership during the year. 

On the basis of this report it appears that: 

1. We need to emphasize evangelism. 

2. We need to lead Christian people to Sabbath observance. 

3. We need to develop our people in stewardship. 

Respectfully submitted 
G. SCOTT TURNER 

Charles Howard led the discussion on the subject "What 
plans should this Association adopt to care for our constitU' 
ency?" Others taking part in the discussion were: J. H. But- 
ler, R. F. Hall, Ford Burns, M. O. Alexander, C. H. Norris, 
Miss Zula Rogers, T. W. Fryer, R. H. Satterfield and W. C. 
Stone. It was the definite feeling of the Association that 
plans should be made to intensify our evangelistic efforts in 
the Little River. Mr. Howard was asked to serve as Chair- 
man of Committee on Evangelism, naming others to serve on 
the committee with him. The Committee: 

Chas. B. Howard, Chmn., Dr. C. D. Bain, S. F. Hudson, 
James H. Butler, Waldo D. Early, L. H. Campbell. 

State Missionary M. O. Alexander spoke to the Associa- 
tion on the theme "Teaching them." 

W. C. Dowd led the closing prayer, after which we ad- 
journed for lunch. 

Wednesday Afternoon Session 

Hymn : "Jesus Keep Me Near The Cross." 
Ford A. Burns read 1 Cor. 10:1-15 and spoke on "The Lo- 
cal Church and Public Morals." 



[17] 



Little River Baptist Association 



T. W. Fryer read the following Temperance Report: 
TEMPERANCE REPORT 

While the Association has asked for a report on temperance, I 
feel that to dwell on this subject alone would be a mistake. There 
are other problems just as great as the one of temperance that de- 
mands our most careful attention, consideration and prayer. 

The serious conditions now prevailing in a world at war add 
to the darkness that shrouds our entire civilized world. Apparently 
conditions that we have accepted lightly and treated at times so care- 
lessly are about to slip from us only to be won again by the dedi- 
cation of ourselves anew to the task that is before us with the "Faith 
of our Fathers" as well as their courage and fearlessness. 
Religious Freedom 

Time does not permit in this brief report a discussion of re- 
ligious freedom which needs in this hour a most serious considera- 
tion and discussion. Quoting from our 1940 North Carolina Baptist 
Annual, "It is now apparent that freedom of worship as well as 
freedom of speech and freedom of the press is in jeopardy around 
the world." 

Patriotism 

We at the present are in great need of an adequate definition 
of patriotism for these perilous days. Principles that we have dared 
to cling to and believe in in ordinary times are now being cast aside 
under the pretext of patriotism. 

Race Relations 

A world brotherhood, the dream of our Master as well as the 
dream of His followers, who still believe that Jesus Christ could and 
would unite all men together in one brotherhood, is perhaps now 
far further in the future than we had hoped and prayed it would 
be a few years ago. Through every means available, such as the 
press, the radio, the motion picture industry, the propaganda of 
hatred and strife among men is being strewn without stint or re- 
serve, the full effects of which cannot and will not die with the clos- 
ing of our present war but will continue long afterwards in the 
realm of peace its work of ruin. We would do well to contrast 
for ourselves as individuals the marked difference between "Total 
War" and the message enunciated by God through His angels that 
first Christmas morning when they proclaimed "Glory to God in 
the Highest, and on earth, peace and goodwill toward men,." 

Looking internally at the problems of these our United States of 
America we still find no justification for real optimism. If a report 
on public morals and temperance could come from God's minority 
that are found in every church and community who are always 
faithful to the Master's service there could indeed be cause for re- 



[18] 



Little River Baptist Association 



j Dicing. Necessity compels us, however, to speak of the majority. 
Thinking, therefore, of society as a whole, let us briefly survey the 
following conditions: 

First — The Christian Home 

There cannot be a Christian nation or society without first of 
all Christian homes. Christian education and evangelism are de- 
pendent upon Christian homes. Yet, since 1870 the population in 
the United States has increased 300 per cent, marriages 400 per cent, 
divorces 2,000 per cent. Divorces are increasing five times faster 
than marriages. This report merely submits this alarming trend 
toward free marriage and the ultimate destruction of the sacredness 
of the home and utter disregard for a marriage vow that was pledged 
before God and witnesses present to last until broken only by death 
or grounds plainly described in our New Testament. 

Second — Crime 

Fifty years ago the United States was the most law abiding na- 
tion in the world. Now it is the most lawless. The cost of crime 
in the United States is now over fifteen billion dollars annually. 
The United States spends over four billion dollars a year to enforce 
law. In the past ten years population has increased 17 per cent, and 
crime has increased 117 per cent. The largest group of criminals in 
the United States averages only twenty-three years in age; the next 
largest group, nineteen; the next largest group, eighteen years of age. 
Third — The Liquor Business 

Alcoholic beverages and strong drink have absolutely no place 
in society, if society deems itself decent and respectable. Alcohol 
kills and destroys the human body. I buried one last week. I know 
what I am talking about. While it does not always destroy the body, 
it always destroys self respect and decency. It paralyzes man's use- 
fulness to society for no man can be to his God or fellowman the 
man he ought to be if he is a drinker either temperately or intem- 
perately. In fact, the writer of this report is of the opinion that 
the moderate drinker, the sociable drinker, the cocktail party, the 
spiked punch, the homemaker who uses it domestically is setting by 
far a more dangerous precedent than the drunkard. Society shrinks 
from the sight of a man in the gutter, ragged, broke, friendless and 
drunk. No one pictures such a scene when they begin to feel rather 
friendly towards alcohol. It is the social event of our towns and 
cities where our church leaders are present, where our best of so 
called society with their sons and daughters are in attendance, along 
with our civic and government leaders that we compromise with this 
deadly foe and leave the impression that because the best of our 
so called society does it, no harm is done. 

This report shall not endeavor to cite statistically the marked 
increase in arrests for drunkenness of both men and women, of in- 

[19] 



Little River Baptist Association 



sanity from alcoholism, fatal accidents upon our highways, the rapid 
increase per capita consumption of alcoholic beverages, and the ever 
increasing drink bill of the United States which last year was four 
billion five hundred million dollars. 

Identifying these facts with Gal. 6:7, "Be not deceived; God is 
not mocked: for whatsoever a man soweth, that shall he also reap," 
America must choose between the overthrowing of this Public Enemy 
No. 1 and stamping out its evil forever or face the dreadful conse- 
quences of its power and influence. America's decision is with you 
and with me and God's people everywhere who believe in right- 
eousness and temperance and judgment to come. 

After an address by Gale Burgess of Raleigh, the report 
was adopted. An offering of $21.66 was sent by Mr. Burgess 
to assist in the work of our N. C. Dry Forces. 

Committee on Time, Place and Preacher made the fol- 
lowing report: 

Time— Oct. 27, 28, 1942. 

Place — Angier. 

Preacher — Sam F. Hudson. 

Committee 

Scott Turner 
Mrs. J. G. Layton 
Mrs. W. P. Surles 
The Committee on Organization, composed of S. F. Hud- 
son, M. L. Hux and Mrs. C. D. Bain gave its report. These re 
ports are found in the Associational Directory in the front of 
this Minute. 

The following Report of the Resolutions Committee was 
read by R. F. Hall. 

REPORT OF RESOLUTIONS COMMITTEE 

Your Committee offers the following resolutions for your con- 
sideration. 
Be it Resolved: 

1. That all Christians join in praying for a just and righteous 
peace for the whole world. And that God shall hasten the day when 
all Nations "shall beat their swords into plowshares, and their spears 
into pruning hooks" when "Nation shall not lift up sword against 
nation, neither shall they learn war any more." 

2. That we preach and practice Temperance in all things, and 
that we deplore the evils of the liquor traffic and urge our people 

[20] 



Little River Baptist Association 



to vote for men who will give the people of North Carolina a chance 
to abolish and drive this destructive evil from our beloved state . 

3. That we as an Association support by our liberal gifts, every 
phase of our Denominational work, at home and in the lands beyond 
the seas. 

4. That we commend to our churches the BIBLICAL RE- 
CORDER, and recommend the establishment of Recorder Clubs in 
every church, and the renewal of subscriptions to this most excellent 
religious paper. 

5. That we as an Association give our moral and financial sup- 
port to our Christian Colleges, and particularly at this time to the 
erection of the Chapel at Wake Forest, 

6. That the Moderator appoint a Committee to study plans for 
the publishing of a History of the Little River Association. The 
churches to be gathering such information now. The Committee to 
have some definite report next year. 

7. That we deplore all unjust, unchristian, and destructive 
criticism so prevalent in many of of our churches, and that we re- 
member the words of the Lord Jesus when He said "Let him that 
is without sin cast the first stone," and the words of the Apostle 
Paul, "And be ye kind one to another, tenderhearted, forgiving one 
another, even as God for Christ's sake hath forgiven you." 

8. That we heartily commend the splendid work of Miss Zula 
Rogers and all those who volunteered their assistance in our Asso- 
ciational Mission work this summer, and that the Moderator appoint 
a Committee to work out plans for the continuance of a paid summer 
worker, if it does not seem probable to have a full time worker for 
our Association. 

9. That we express our sincere thanks to the Neill's Creek 
church and community for their gracious hospitality and the splendid 
manner in which they have entertained this session of the Little 
River Association. 

Respectfully submitted, 
R. F. HALL 
H. Y. SMITH 
MRS. W. D. EARLY 

Each of the above Resolutions was voted on and passed 
without a dissenting vote. Numbers four and five were ac- 
cepted by standing vote. 

In addition to the above Resolutions two others were in- 
troduced, voted on and accepted. 

1. That we as an Association express our appreciation and grat- 

[21] 



Little River Baptist Association 



itude to Mr. Hall, who has for a number of years been so faithful 
as our Clerk. 

MRS. W. D. EARLY 

2. That the churches of the Little River Association do now 
increase the salary of the Pastor commensurate with the present in- 
crease in the cost of living. 

MODERATOR L. H. CAMPBELL 

The following abbreviated Report on Missions, by Scott 
Turner, was not read but the Association requested that it be 
included in the Minutes. 

REPORT ON MISSIONS 

(Abbreviated) 
State Missions 
The State Mission Board labors as follows: 

1. Establishing and supporting Churches. 

2. Ministry of Church Development. 

Two general missionaries and workers in the 77 fields 
of Sunday Schools, Training Unions, among students, and 
our pastors. 

3. Ministry to the sick. 

At Oteen, Western Sanatarium, and State Sanatarium. 

4. Ministry to the wayward. 

At Samarcand and East Carolina Training School. 

5. Ministry to other races. 

Indians and the Negroes. 

Home Missions , 
The Home Mission Board labors among six groups of foreign 
language speaking peoples in our Southland, amongst the Indians, 
the deaf, the Jews, and the Negroes. The Board also operates res- 
cue missions and goodwill centers and carries on a large mission 
in Cuba. 

Foreign Missions \ 

The Foreign Missions Board carries on its work in fourteen 
countries and reports during the past year 2,023 churches, 3,312 mis- 
sion stations, 18,542 baptisms. 

G. SCOTT TURNER 
COMMITTEE 

Former Clerk and Treasurer Hall reported all bills paid 
with a balance in bank of $8.79. C. W. Flowers audited his 
books and brought in a favorable report. The cash in bank 
was turned over to the present Treasurer. The Treasurer was 

[22] 



Little River Baptist Association 



authorized to reimburse Moderator Campbell to the amount 
of $12.50 which he had spent as Associational expense during 
the year. This was done. 

The amounts of money received from the churches and 
individuals, toward defraying the expenses of our Association- 
al worker, are as follows: 

Dunn $100.00 



Buies Creek 


75.00 


Angier 


75.00 


Lillington 


50.00 


Holly Springs 


35.00 


Antioch 


30.00 


Chalybeate Spgs. 


25.00 


Erwin 


20.00 


Coats 


20.00 


Broadway 


10.00 


Harmony 


9.00 


Swann Station 


5.00 


Bethel 


5.00 


Layton's Chapel 


5.00 


J. G. Layton 


10.00 


L. H. Campbell 


5.00 


Paul Bradley 


5.00 


E. W. Smith 


5.00 


H. 0. Austin 


1.00 


Cash at Executive 


meeting 11.15 


Total to date 


$501.15 



This amount was paid to Miss Rogers, who served so 
faithfully and well as Special Worker in the Little River in 
1941. The remaining $33.85 was definitely subscribed by some 
of the members of Angier Church and Coats Church. Both 
of these churches are credited above as having paid some into 
the Missionary Fund. 

Note: The above figures will not correspond with the 

[23] 



Little River Baptist Association 



gifts in the "Associational Missions" Column because much 
of it was paid after the Associational year closed in October. 
After singing "Blest Be The Tie" the body adjourned, be- 
ing led in the closing prayer by C. H. Norris. 

L. H. Campbell, Moderator 
Waldo D. Early, Clerk 

Promotion-Executive Committee Meeting 
January 11, 1942 Lillington Church. 

Repreentatives of 17 of the churches of the Little River 
Association met in Executive sesson, at the call of Moderator 
Campbell. 

After a period of singing and devotions, reports were heard 
from the Sunday School and Training Union Departments. 
Defnite plans were revealed by the leaders of this work for 
enlarged efforts during the year 

Upon resignation of Waldo D. Early of Broadway, as Clerk 
and Treasurer of the Body, H. B. Taylor of Dunn was elected 
Pro-tem. Mr. Campbell spoke words of appreciation for the 
work of Mr. Early, both as Pastor in the Association and as 
Associational Officer serving in varied places of responsi- 
bility. 

L. H. CAMPBELL, Moderator 
H. B. TAYLOR, Clerk, Pro-tem 



[24] 



Little River Baptist Association 

— ■ 5 

MINUTES OF ANNUAL MEETING 

LITTLE RIVER W. M. U. ASSOCIATION 

ANGIER BAPTIST CHURCH 

Sept. 11, 1941 

The Woman's Missionary Union of the Little River Association, 
opened its annual session at Angier Sept. 11, 1941, at 10:00. 

The meeting was called to order by the Superintendent, Mrs. 
Dewey Whittenton. 

Hymn: "Jesus Saves." 

Theme: "Our Continuing Task — Making His Way Known." 

Devotional — Psalm 67:2, led by Mrs. S. F. Hudson, Lillington, 
with prayer led by Rev. T. W. Fryer, Dunn. 

Mrs. A. L. Overby of the Angier Church extended words of wel- 
come and Mrs. J. G. Layton, Lillington, responded. 

The program as printed was adopted as the order of business. 

The following committees were appointed: 
Nominating Committee 

Mrs. A. L. Overby Angier 

Mrs. C. K. Smith Chalybeate Springs 

Mrs. T. T. Lanier Buies Creek 

Mrs. D. J. Thomas Broadway 

Miss Mattie Bain Coats 

Ti7iie and Place Committee 

Mrs. J. C. Jones Dunn 

Mrs. G. Hugh Johnson Neill's Creek 

Mrs. W. D. Early Broadway 

Resolutions Committee 

Mrs. T. W. Fryer Dunn 

Mrs. W. E. Nickols Coats 

Mrs. I. B. Smith Coats 

Reports were heard as follows: 

Mission Study. Report incomplete but good. There are now 
125 books in our Associational library. Urged that more mission 
study be done in order to better inform ourselves on world condi- 
tions. A new series of books, just off the press, was suggested for 
mission study classes. There were 9 classes sponsored from the 
Associational library and 9 W. M. U.'s reached Standard in mission 
study. 

Stewardship. There are now 106 tithers reported in the Asso- 
ciation. Three stewardship classes have been held, 45 one hundred 
thousand club memberships reported ,with 6 churches reporting no 
memberships. Our apportionment for the Association is $630.00. 
We still lack $84.90. 

[25] 



Little River Baptist Association 



Personal Service. The outstanding work has been visiting the 
County Home and Prison Camp, with 14 churches making these 
visits. Other work has been done in the local churches among its 
members and communities. 

Margaret Fund. There are 88 students in Southwide Baptist 
Colleges, with 15 in North Carolina. Each society was asked to re- 
remember a particular student during the year, and each society 
was asked to contribute $3.00 to the Burney Fund, which supplies 
these students with the necessary articles. 

Training School. The New Home at the Training School is now 
being used. Homecoming, for all students will be observed from 
Sept. 9-12. The building is paid for. Old building has been leased 
to a radio station. North Carolina was asked to contribute $1,700 
to current expenses and $1200.00 to scholarships. Miss Versa Russell 
of Troy is now using the Lay ton Scholarship. 

Literature. Mrs. Layton exhibited copies of World Comrades, 
Y. W. A. Window, Royal Service, Commission, Home Mission Maga- 
zine, Charity and Children and Biblical Recorder and urged that 
we supply our young people with these religious papers and period- 
icals. 

Mrs. Chas. Howard was asked to take the cjiair while the Sup- 
erintendent read her report. This report of the year's work proved 
very encouraging. 

Motion made and carried that all reports be adopted. 

Visitors were recognized. 

Roll Call of Societies: Angier, Antioch, Broadway, Buie's Creek, 
Coats, Dunn, Chalybeate Springs, Friendship, Erwin, Harmony, Holly 
Springs, Lillington, Neil's Creek and Swann's Station responded 
with reports and 108 delegates and $23.10 for the progress fund. 

Conference on W. M. U. Methods was led by Mrs. W. D. Briggs, 
Raleigh, Executive Secretary of W. M. U. of North Carolina. 

Special Music — "The Holy City" — was beautifully rendered by 
Mrs. Charles Howard, accompanied by Mrs. H. W. Whittenton, Dunn. 

Address: Mrs. W. R. Stone, Durham Superintendent of the Ra- 
leigh Division of W. M. U., gave a most inspiring message, using 
as the basis of her discussion Acts 26:22. She told of how the power 
of God transforms our lives and makes us want to witness for Christ. 
We must first see the need, then pray for a closer fellowship with 
Christ and then go and witness for Him, through our gifts, prayers 
and personal interest. She brought to our minds many of the places 
and agencies where we may witness for Him. She spoke in particu- 
lar of the boys in camp, and how we might witness for Christ, when 
they are in our midst. We need also to think of the densely popu- 
lated areas around these camps. 

Minutes were dispensed with and announcements made. 



[26] 



Little River Baptist Association 



Prayer, led by Rev. Ford Burns. 

Adjournment for lunch. 

Afternoon Session 

The afternoon session was presided over by Mrs. J. H. Butler, 
Angier, Young People's leader. 

Hymn: "Throw Out the Lifeline," 

Devotional: Isaiah 60: 1, led by Miss Virginia Womble of Lilling- 
ton. 

Prayer: Rev. Sam F. Hudson. 

At this time Mrs. Butler reported on two meetings held. Asso- 
ciation Y. W. A. banquet, held in June at Campbell College with 120 
present. Miss Mary Currin as guest speaker, and Young People's 
Rally, held at Chalybeate Springs, with 185 present. Miss Elizabeth 
Lassiter, Divisional Young People's Leader, made the address of the 
afternoon. 

Playlet: "That We May Truly Foster," presented by the young 
people of the Angier church, directed by Mrs. Butler. 

Address: Mrs. Bunn Olive, Missionary to Chinkiang, China. 

Mrs. Olive spoke of the great opportunity we enjoy as Ameri- 
cans, and asked if we really realized what it meant to be citizens of 
this country. She related if we really realized the many experiences 
in the lives of many of the young people of China and said that they 
now understand more fully what Christ suffered on Calvary. She 
told of the degenerating habit of opium ,which is being sponsored by 
the military leaders of Japan. She mentioned the millions in West 
China, who are in need of the Gospel and told of the many things 
the government is doing to aid them. She urged us to accept the 
Banner of Christ and work faithfully for Him. 

Prayer, led by Mrs. J. H. Butler. 

Miss Zula Rodgers was present and reported on what she had 
been doing in connection with the W. M. U. work. She urged that 
we foster the young people's organizations. 

Report of Committees — 

Resolutions: Expressing gratitude for the splendid hospitality 
and fellowship, for the challenging leadership of our Associational 
officers, and the recognition of Mrs. W. D. Briggs, Mrs. W. R. Stone, 
Mrs. Bunn Olive and Associational pastors in attendance, and a re- 
solve to deeper consecration and higher heights of service. 

Time and Place: Lillington and the time to be the same unless 
the Executive Committee deems wise to change. 

Report of Nominating Committee: The officers are listed in 
the Associational Directory, in front of the Minutes. 

A motion was made and carried that these reports be accepted. 
The Associational Officers for the year 1941-42 were asked to 
come to the front, where they were introduced to the assembly. 

[27] 



Little River Baptist Association 



Prayer: Led by Mrs. Briggs, Raleigh. 

The Memorial service vvras conducted by Mrs. Charles Howard, 
after w^hich Mrs. Young of Benson, led in a prayer of dedication. 

Minutes of the morning and afternoon sessions w^ere read and 
approved. 

Benediction: Rev. Waldo Early. 

Respectfully submitted, 

MRS. S. D. WHITTENTON, Supt. 
MRS. R. DURHAM TAYLOR, Sec. 



[28] 



Little River Baptist Association 



Our Departed Loved Ones 



ANGIER— 

Mr, Sidney H. Broadwell 

ANTIOCH— 

Deacon M. B. Byrd 
Mrs. Sarah Davis 

BAPTIST CHAPEL— 
Mrs. Dora Thomas 
Mrs. Linda Thomas 
Mrs. Callie Thomas 
Mr. Floyd Fuquay 

BAPTIST GROVE— 
Mr. J. D. Gilbert 

BETHEL— 

Miss Ethel Johnson 

BUIE'S CREEK— 

Mrs. Cade A. Turlington 
Mr. J. Frank Gregory 

CHALYBEATE SPRINGS— 
Mrs. Allie Walters 
Mr. T. H. Knight 
Mrs. Alice Hamilton 
Mr. J. P. MattheMrs 

COATS— 

Mr. L. L. Stewart 
Mrs. L. L. Stewart 

DUNN— 

Mr. Z. H. Duncan 



Mr. I. W. Keen 
Mrs. A. C. Lowery 
Mrs. I. M. Reams 

ERWIN— 

Deacon J. R. Treseington 
Mrs. E. R. Caldwell 

EAST ERWIN— 
Mrs. J. J. Turnage 

HARMONY— 

Mrs. Herman Olive 
Mr. J. A. Hamilton 

HOLLY SPRINGS— 
Mrs. Elbert Patterson ' 
Mrs. Alex Byrd 
Mr. W. H. Taylor 

LILLINGTON— 
Mr. Fuller Johnson 

NEIL'S CREEK— 
Mr. John Wilder 

PINEY GROVE— 
Mrs. Maude Lynch 

RAWLS— 

Deacon C. T. Smith 
Mrs. Johnnie Wilkerson 
Mrs. James Weathers 

SWANN STATION— 
Mr. Arch W. Holt 



[29] 



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^943 * 



MINUTES 
of the 

Little River Baptist 
Association 

NORTH CAROLINA 

SIXTY-SEVENTH ANNUAL SESSION 

Held With 

ANGIER BAPTIST CHURCH 

Angier, N. C. 

OCTOBER 27, 1942 

Leslie H. Campbel!, Moderator Buie's Creelc 

Sam F. Hudson, Vice-Moderator Lillington 

Owen Odum, Clerk-Treasurer Coats 

The next Annual Session will be held with the Antioch 
Baptist Church October 26, 1943 



1^ 



•M>*»«*«J*<>«*W. 



""^^ I ' l ' i " ! " ) - '• ii ~»-> -ir-ii nn i ' » n i ~ «r^i V'T"if"r -i r i n i r i ~ " i " r r » "r' i " i r- i ~ i '" < ~ i '* i "«- i nr i r> < ~ ii r iiriinii-ir r iririrnriinr>nriiniiir»rir i -M»»»riuuTu i > i i i<M>«>ftri jTjr > n . »» fi ^ ^ 



MINUTES 

of the 

LiUle River Baptist 
Association 

NORTH CAROLINA 
SIXTY-SEVENTH ANNUAL SESSION 

Held With 

ANGIER BAPTIST CHURCH 

Angier, N. C. 
OCTOBER 27, 1942 

Leslie H. Campbell, Moderator Buie's Creek 

Sam F. Hudson, Vice-Moderator . Lillington 

Owen Odum, Clerk-Treasurer Coats 

The next Annual Session will be held with the Antioch 
Baptist Church October 26, 1943 



Index 

Associational Directory 8 

Dedication to Miss Zula Rogers 5 

Our Departed Loved Ones 39 

Proceedings Begin 11 

Reports — 

American Bible Society 23 

Baptist Colleges 23 

Baptist Training Union 29 

Christian Literature 14 

Committee On Time and Place 37 

Evangelism . 22 

Little River Associational Worker 12 

Ministers' Retirement Plan 15 

Missions ^ 22 

Nominating Committee 37 

Orphanage 15 

Resolutions Committee 35, 37 

State and Condition of Churches 26 

Sunday Schools 31 

Temperance and Public Morals 17 

Woman's Missionary Union 32 

Statistical Tables Begin 40 



Minutes Of The Little River Baptist Association 




'c^^ 




MISS ZULA ROGERS 



To our friend and co-worker, in grateful recognition of her 
sacrificial labors in the Little River Association for many years, 
and particularly for her invaluable leadership for the past two 
years as Associational Missionary, by unanimous approval we 
dedicate this volume of the Minutes. 



Minutes Of The Little River Baptist Association 

Directory Of The 

Little River Baptist 

Association 

* * * * 

Officers Of The Association 

Moderator L. H. Campbell, Buie's Creek 

Vice-Moderator Sam F. Hudson, Lillington 

Clerk-Treasurer Owen Odum, Coats 

S. S. Supt. Mrs. Ford Burns, Fuquay 

Training Union Director T. A. Powell, Lillington 

Supt. of Evangelism Charles Howard, Buie's Creek 

Christian Literature Chmn. T. A. Powell, Lillington 

Orphanage Representative CD. Bain, Dunn 

Missions Representative C. E. Ruffin, Broadway 

Temperance Chairman John A. McLeod, Lillington 

Christian Education Representative Mrs. C. D. Bain, Dunn 

Hospital Representative Albert Lamm, Wake Forest 

Ministers' Annuity Chairman Mrs. Joel Layton, Lillington 

Associational Missionary Miss Zula Rogers, Mamers 

7 



Minutes Of The Little River Baptist Association 

Note: The above Officers are to be more than writers of 
reports to bring to the next Annual Session of the Little River 
Association. They are to do something to report^ The Moder- 
ator has urged that each serve the full twelve months in the ca- 
pacity to which he has been elected, and then bring a report of 
what he has led the churches to do. 



ASSOCIATIONAL W. M. U. OFFICERS 

Superintendent Mrs. C. B. Howard Buie's Creek 

Assistant Supt. Mrs. J. A. McLeod, Dunn 

Young Peoples' Leader 

Miss Ophelia Matthews, Chalybeate Springs 

Mission Study Chairman Mrs. Durham Taylor, Dunn 

Personal Service Chairman 

Mrs. S. F. Hudson, Lillington 

Stewardship Chairman Miss Lillian Draughon, Dunn 

Training School 

Mrs. C. K. Smith, Chalybeate Springs 

Margaret Fund Miss Mattie Bain, Dunn 

Literature Mrs. J. G. Layton, Sr., Lillington 

White Cross Chairman Mrs. Robert Young, Angier 

Sec. and Treas. Mrs. L. H. Campbell, Buie's Creek 



8 



Minutes Of The Little River Baptist Association 

Associational Sunday School Officers 

General Supt. Mrs. Ford Burns, Fuquay 

Supt. of Evangelism Charles Howard, Buie's Creek 

Supt. Western Group L. J. Atkinson, Lillington, R. 3 

Supt. Eastern Group Harry Wood, Angier 

Supt. Central Group G. Scott Turner, Erwin 

Supt. Cradle Roll Dept. Mrs. C. L. Guy, Dunn 

Supt. Beginners Dept. Miss Ophelia Matthews, Kipling 

Supt. Primary Dept. Miss Mamie Haighwood, Lillington 

Supt. Junior Dept. Mrs. R. A. Duncan, Dunn 

Supt. Intermediate Dept. C. D. Bain, Dunn 

Supt. Young People's Dept. Thomas Brady, Erwin 

Supt. Adult Dept. Mrs. L. E. Johnson, Angier 

Supt. Home and Extension Dept. 

Mrs. A. L. Overby, Angier 

Associational Training Union Officers 
Director T. A. Powell, Lillington 

Associate Director Julius Holloway, Buie's Creek 

Secretary-Treas. Miss Jennie Campbell, Dunn 

Pastor-Advisor Sam F. Hudson, Lillington 

Adult Leader Miss Lillian Draughon, Dunn 

Young Peoples' Leader 

Miss Ophelia Matthews, Kipling 

Intermediate Leader Miss Louise Pender, Buie's Creek 

Junior Leader Miss Bessie McNeill, Broadway, R i 

Story Hour Leader Miss Addie Prevatte, Buie's Creek 

Eastern Group Leader Miss Egetta Williams, Angier 

Central Group Leader Cornell Smith, Varina 

Western Group Leader Miss Edith Knight, Broadway 

Publicity Director ____ Miss Bradeene Blackman, Buie's Creek 
Pianist ;yi,s Sam F. Hudson, Lillington 

Executive-Promotion Committee made up of one member from 
each church with all pastors and Associational officers as 
members Ex-officio. 

ANGIER— C. W. Flowers a • 

ANTIOCH-J. C. Bullock Z":: "LmrnVt'on rT' .' 

BAPTIST CHAPEL-J. R. Howard\\\\~\\V Jol'sbl; Rt* 2 



Minutes Of The Little River Baptist Association 

BAPTIST GROVE— Veldon Sexton Fuquay Springs, Rt. 1 

BETHEL— W. G. Elmore Manchester 

BROADWAY— Earl Wishart Broadway 

BUIE'S CREEK— Mrs. Alton Johnson Buie's Creek 

CHALYBEATE SPRINGS— Mrs. Richard Connor ____ Kipling 

COATS— Owen Odum Coats 

CUMBERLAND UNION— John Sears Fuquay Springs 

DUNN— C. D. Bain Dunn 

ERWIN, FIRST— Ralph Holt Erwin 

EAST ERWIN— Mrs. C. M. Baker Erwin 

FRIENDSHIP— Mrs. B. F. Parker Erwin 

HARMONY— Miss Georgia Wilkins Lillington 

HOLLY SPRINGS— B. B. Wilson Broadway 

KENNEBEC— M. T. Olive Willow Springs 

LAYTON'S CHAPEL— E. L. Hill Bunn Level, Rt. 1 

LILLINGTON— Mrs. J. G. Layton Lillington 

MACEDONIA— J. C. Smith Holly Springs 

NEILL'S CREEK— Rllen Matthews Angier, Rt. 2 

OAK GROVE— A. S. Lamm Buie's Creek 

PINEY GROVE— I. L. Howell Varina 

PLEASANT MEMORY— H. C. Ousley Lillington 

RAWLS— T. H. Gardner Fuquay Springs 

•SWANN STATION— A. R. Batchelor Olivia 

Associational Presbytery 
L. H. Campbell, Scott Turner, Chas. B. Howard and Pastor of 

the Candidate. 

Associational Executive Committee 
L. H. Campbell, S. F. Hudson, Owen Odum. 
Note: This Committee is authorized by the Association to work 

out plans for financing and promoting the Summer Work, 

or for a full time Paid Worker if it seems probable to sup-^ 

port one. , 



10 



Minutes Of The Little River Baptist Association 

Proceedings 

The Sixty-seventh Annual Session of the Little River Bap- 
tist Association met with the Angier Baptist Church, Angier, 
North Carolina, on Tuesday morning, October 27, 1942. 

The meeting was called to order by the Moderator, after 
which Harry Wood, new pastor of the Angier Baptist Church, 
led the morning devotional, using for the Scripture lesson 
Ephesians 4: 1-6. The congregation then sang with fine spirit 
"Blest Be The Tie." 

Proceeding with the business of organization, Owen 
Odum, Clerk of the Association, called the roll of churches and 
enrolled the messengers present. In addition to the official 
delegates and visitors from the local churches, the following 
visitors from outside the Association were recognized: 

Lr. L. L. Carpenter, Editor of the Biblical Recorder 

Rev. George Graham, Pastor from the Sandy Creek Asso 
ciation 

P. A. Carter, now a resident of Raleigh 

Rev. H. C. McCall, Pastor from the Johnston Association 

Rev. James Butler, Pastor from the Wilmington Associa- 
tion. 

M. A. Huggins, Executive Secretary of the Baptist State 
Convention 

J. C. Hough, Superintendent of Kennedy Home branch of 
Baptist Orphanage 

Smith Hagaman, Superintendent of Baptist Hospital 

Rev. G. G. Lanter, Evangelist, Winston-Salem, N. C. 

F. B. Hamrick, Bursar of Meredith College. 

The following officers were elected for the ensuing year 
by the duly enrolled delegates: 

L. H. Campbell, Moderator; Sam F. Hudson, Vice-Modera- 
tor; Owen Odum, Clerk and Treasurer. 

With the approval of the Association the following commit- 
tees were appointed by the Moderator: 

Committee on Nominations: Rev. S. F. Hudson, Rev. G. 
Scott Turner, Miss Zula Rogers, Mrs. Charles Howard. 

Committee on Time and Place: Mrs. J. G. Layton, Mrs. W. 
E. Medlin, Rev. Harry Wood. ' 

11 



Minutes Of The Little River Baptist Association 

Committee on Resolutions — Charles Howard, A. S. Lamm, 
C. E. Ruffin. 

On motion the suggested program was adopted as the reg- 
ular order of business for the sixty-seventh annual session. 

After Vice-Moderator Sam F. Hudson had been called to 
the chair, the Moderator presented his annual message to the 
Association, in which he listed outstanding achievements of the 
closing year and pointed to important business requiring the at- 
tention of the assembled delegates. Special mention was 
made of the building programs at Bethel, Oak Grove, and Lil- 
lington. Brother J. G. Layton of the Harmony Baptist Church 
was saluted as perhaps the outstanding layman of the year, in 
recognition of his generous donations to several churches and 
his interest in the missionary program of the Association. 
Among other recommendations the Moderator asked the Asso- 
ciation to appoint a Committee to work with the two groups 
in the Piney Grove Church, now badly divided, in the hope of 
restoring reunion and fellowship. After some discussion of 
the latter recommendation, the matter was referred to the Com- 
mittee on Resolutions. 

Special mention was also made of the work of Miss Zula 
Rogers, who for two years has officially represented the Asso- 
ciation as special worker in the churches. The Moderator rec- 
ommended that in recognition of her unselfish devotion 
to every good cause in the Association, the 1942 Minutes of the 
Association be dedicated to Miss Rogers. 

Miss Zula Rogers, Associational Missionary, summarized 
her activities with the various churches during the past year 
and pled for an expansion of the work done cooperatively by 
the Association. Her report follows: 

Report Of Little River Associational Worker— 1942 

You have hardly had an Associational worker this year. I 
merely agreed to sponsor the work until a successor was named 
Miss Neva Harper spent four weeks on the field and did a marvel- 
ous work in conducting four Bible schools. The little that I have 
done has been wedged between a heavy schedule. 

While I am grateful for the contacts I have made, I have been 
distressed because other duties did not allow me to meet the de- 
mands of the churches. The twelve weeks I spent off the field 

12 



Minutes Of The Little River Baptist Association 

should have been the most fruitful season for personal work in re- 
vival services. 

Even though gas and tires are scarce, only one church gave 
this as an excuse for not having a Bible school. More people 
walked to the schools than ever before. Mr. J. O. Weathers of Cum- 
berland Union, age 73, walked 3 1-2 miles to the church and 3 1-2 
miles back, a total of 7 miles per day to tell the Bible story in the 
Junior department. Several pupils walked a total of 6 miles per 
day. Those who attended seemed to demonstrate a finer spirit of 
reverence, more interest in hymns, more skill in the use of the 
Bible, and better cooperation in play than in any previous year. 

In visiting the churches, I have noted that with only two ex- 
ceptions each church has made some material improvement. Two 
new buildings have been erected, some have been enlarged, and 
others repaired and painted their present building, many have pur- 
chased new hymn books, new pews, and pulpit furniture. 

Even though our organizational work has made improvement, 
your worker feels that not enough emphasis is being placed on eith- 
er the training or mission work of our churches. Too few churches 
are promoting these organizations. 

May I take this opportunity to thank each of you for making 
the following report possible and to urge that as you face perhaps 
the hardest year in the history of the Association you remember 
;the promise found in Proverbs 3:6: "In all thy ways acknowledge 
Him and He shall direct thy paths." 

Number of Bible schools held in churches 25 

Number of Bible schools held in Mission Sunday Schools 1 

Total number of Bible schools held 26 

Number of conversions reported in Bible schools 24 

Sunday School Enlargement Campaigns held 1 

Churches participating 16 

Classes taught by worker 1 

W. M. U. Mission Study classes taught by worker 2 

Societies visited 4 

Letters written 16 

Cards written 55 

Phone calls 14 

Homes visited 58 

Talks made 18 

Shut-ins visited with a program 24 

Census taken 1 

Census tabulated 1 

Respectfully submitted, 
Zula Rogers 

13 



Minutes Of The Little River Baptist Association 

Truby Powell presented in an impressive manner the Re- 
port on Christian Literature, using as his title, 'What Little 
River Baptists Are Not Reading." 

Report On Christian Literature 

E. L. Chase in his book, "Where Will I Be At Fifty?", wrote 
especially to business men. He says that an hour a day intelligent- 
ly applied to reading and study will change the whole course of u 
man's life. 

As Christians,, we have a double obligation to continue to 
learn and to grow. Jesus himself set the example. He "increassd 
in wisdom and stature, and in favor with Gcd and^^man." He said, 
"Take my yoke upon you, and learn of me." Many of our people 
in our Association are taking Him at His command. We show a 
slight increase in subscriptions to almost every paper, magazine 
or periodical our denomination fosters. "We are happy to report 
171 subscriptions to Royal Service; 26, Window of Y. W. A.; 65, 
World Comrades; 48, Commission; 10, Home Missions, and 317 sub- 
scriptions to the Biblical Recorder. Seventeen of our twenty-six 
churches have a Recorder Club, a large increase over pur last 
year's report. 

Our problem is awaking our people to the value of reading 
Christian literature. When we realize the value of it, we will find 
time for it. 

Below is a suggested goal for the coming year: Royal Service, 
190 subscriptions; Window of Y. W. A., 35; World Comrades, 75; 
Commission, 60; Home Missions, 20; Biblical Recorder, 350; 20 
churches with Biblical Recorder Clubs. 

Too, I suggest the organization of a library in every church pos- 
sible, with an active librarian who will lead the people in the 
reading of good books. I further recommend a more prayerful and 
searching study of God's Word, the primary source of inspiration 
for right living and Christian endeavor. 

Respectfully submitted, 
Truby A. Powell 

Following the report Dr. L. L. Carpenter, newly elected 
editor of the Biblical Recorder, outlined the new policy of this 
religious journal and strongly appealed to Little River Baptists 
for united support. 

The Baptist program for the care of aged and disabled min- 
isters was brought to the attention of the Association by Bro- 

14 



Minutes Of The Little River Baptist Association 

ther W. C. Stone, of the East Erwin Baptist Church. The re- 
port is as follows: 

Report On Ministers' Retirement Plan 

The care of aged or infirm workers in this country is now 
recognized as an eseential business procedure which is participated 
in by the worker, his employer, and the government. 

In line with this enlightened policy the Relief and Annuity 
Board of the Southern Baptist Convention has worked out a wise 
plan for the care of our pastors and their dependents in old age or 
in case of disability. The pastor himself, the church he serves, 
and the Baptist State Convention all take part. The plan in North 
Carolina is for the pastor to pay 4 per cent of his salary, the church 
to pay an equal amount, and the Convention to pay $18. At the 
age of 65 the pastor may retire and receive approximately 25 per 
cent of his average salary; or, if he is disabled before reaching this 
age, he may receive up to $500. a year. 

Many ministers hesitate to ask their churches to participate in 
the Annuity plan because they would seem to be seeking personal 
benefits. They should not have- to ask. The deacons of each 
church should insist ' that the plan be put into effect when a pas- 
tor is called. When the pastor is already serving, the deacons 
should study the matter, present it to the church, and see that it 
adopted. . 

We recommend that this Association appoint a committee to 
get in touch with each church in our number, explain this plan to 
them, and urge the churches to participate in this business-like ar- 
rangement for the welfare of our pastors and their families when 
old age comes upon them. 

Respectfully submitted, 
Carlie Stone 

The work of North Carolina Baptists in the field of social 
welfare was further considex-ed in the report of Dr. C. D. Bam 
on "Our Homeless Children" and the discussion of that report 
by Rev. J. C. Hough, General Manager of the Kennedy home. 

Report On Baptist Orphanage Of North Carolina 

The cry of the orphan child is supposed to touch th^ hardest 
heart. As the angel of God said to Hagar in her desolation, "Fear 
not; for God hath heard the cry of the lad where he is;" so North 
Carolina Baptists are heeding the cry of 664 full orphans, half- 
orphans, and victims of desertion or wrecked homes. This service 
is rendered through Mothers' Aid, boarding homes, and the Orph- 

15 



Minutes Of The Little River Baptist Association 

anage proper. The demands upon the Orphanage authorities have 
never been greater. They receive on an average forty-five appli- 
cations every month during the year. The average cost of running 
the Orphanage is $500 a day; the Orphanage is dependent on Bap- 
tists of North Carolina for this support. 

WHAT WE HAVE DONE 

' The twenty-six churches of the Little River Association have 
^given during the year a total of $2,219.29 to our Orphanage. With 
a membership of 6,717, this means an average of thirty-three 
cents per member, which shows how much we have responded 
to the cry of need. Of the twenty-six churches, seven have sent 
contributions each month, nineteen have sent contributions from 
time to time, and one has sent nothing at all. 

SOME PROBLEMS 

1. War has engulfed us since we last met. With all our dis- 
tractions and sacrifices, we must not forget the needy children 
War conditions will increase our responsibility for child-care. 

2. As the problems of travel increase, it will be more diffi- 
cult for our Orphanage representatives to reach the churches. More 
and more the Orphanage will have to depend upon "Charity and 
Children" to get its message to the people. Every Baptist pastor 
and Sunday School Superintendent in the State receives the paper 
free and every Baptist Sunday School should have a "Charity and 
Children" Club. 

3. In addition to needing information about our Orphanage 
work, definite, organized plans (such as once-a-month offering) 
'for contribution regularly are needed. Not only must the current 
1 needs be met, but we should build up a reserve for the lean years 

ahead. 

RECOMMENDATIONS 

As the Associational Orphanage representative, we recom- 
mend: 

1. That a "Charity and Children" Club, large enough to send 
a copy into every home, be formed in every church, at club rates 
of sixty cents per year. 

2. That Sunday School classes, departments, or other organi- 
zations of the church be encouraged to send material gifts to the 
Orphanage, such as quilts, towels, produce; and in some cases to 
support an orphan child. 

3. That a worthy offering, equal to an average day's income 
from each giver, be made in all our churches at Thanksgiving. 

4. That an offering once a month be made and sent monthly 
to provide for continuous care. 

16 



Minutes Of The Little River Baptist Association 

5. That individuals be led to make bequests of war bonds, 
money, or property to the Orphanage, especially when their own 
families do not need such bequests. 

6. That the Sunday School Superintendent in each church be 
designated as the Orphanage representative to lead in carrying out 

these plans. 

Respectfully submitted, 
C. D. Bain 

Due to the lateness of the hour, the Report on Hospitals 
was postponed and made the first order of business after lunch, 
in order that the Association might hear the Annual Sermon 
preached by Rev. Sam F. Hudson, Pastor of the Lillington Bao- 
tist Church. 

Afternoon Session 

The afternoon session was opened with prayer and song, 
in the absence of Dr. A. W. Peede, appointed to report on 
"Baptists Ministering to the Sick," Smith Hagaman, Superin- 
tendent of our Baptist Hospital, after bringing greetings from 
his institution, spoke with feeling on the ravages of alco- 
holic beverages upon public health. 

A vigorous comprehensive report on Temperance and Pub 
lie Morals was presented by M. L, Skaggs, Professor of Social 
Sciences at Campbell College. The report as printed below, was 
enthusiastically adopted by the Association. 

Report On Temperance And Public Morals 

While we are face to face with the greatest struggle in the his- 
tory of human relations for the preservation of a moral civiliza- 
tion, it is quite fitting that we should consider in our Association 
the question of temperance and public morals. Surely the Chris- 
tian church in general and our Baptist churches in particular havo 
the urgent duty of setting moral tone to the culture of our region. 

All that Anglo-Saxon history has built up in the v/ay of hu- 
man rights through the centuries is challenged today throughout 
the earth. Axis policy and propaganda have and are challenging 
every right and every ideal by us held dear. Freedom of worship, 
freedom of speech, freedom of petition, freedom of assembly, free- 
dom of conscience and conviction, are called by the dictators obso- 
lete relics of a by-gone era, and they swear they will destroy them 
root and branch. Furthermore, they sneer at our ideals of sex pur- 

17 



Minutes Of The Little River Baptist Association 

ity and violate every one of the ten commandments without a sin- 
gle surge of feeling of inward guilt. The moral con 
science of the world has been stirred, and we must get in step with 
the hosts of the Lord. 

Opportunities for the Christian crusader are on every hand. 
Around our military camps prostitution became so widespread that 
our Congress had to pass the May Act, making the profession of 
the camp followers a federal as well as a state and local offense. 
Hundreds of prosecutions have been conducted against this evil, 
but it is still with us. Army authorities charged recently that our 
capitol city was the worst offender in this region. Neighboring 
Cumberland County finds itself facing an unparalleled burden ia 
the field of morals. Many boys from the Little River Association 
are in the military camps, and we must not neglect them. Can we 
not let them know by personal letter and church messages that 
God's people constantly have them on their hearts? They can be 
i deeply impressed with the fact that this war is a moral crusade, 
'and that Christian men can wage it most effectively. We commend 
the efforts of the U. S. O. to give them whosesome entertainment. 

Another habit that is fastening itself upon our people, especial- 
ly our young folk, is extravagance. Money is abundant in our 
country today, even among our farm population We must buy war 
bonds, our children should be encouraged to buy war stamps rather 
than luxuries, and all of us should sacrifice our expensive pleasures 
for support of war relief and the many other worthy causes of our 
day. 

Ethnic groups in our population should concern us as Chris- 
tians with a world vision. Our Hebrew friends are suffering un- 
told agonies in Europe. Millions are being persecuted and tens of 
thousands slain. Torn from their homelands and forced into slav- 
ery, if they are fortunate, slaughtered if not enslaved, they present 
the Christian world with its most heart-rending spectacle. It is a 
moral and spiritual obligation of God's people to endeavor to al- 
leviate their suffering in every possible way. Let us also strive to 
eradicate unfounded suspicions of loyal Italians, Japanese, and 
Germans. Many of them are in our land and are devoted to it. 

Although relations between the white and colored people in our 
section are improving, it is our obligation to protect our colored 
brethren as much as possible from temptation, to strive to increase 
their educational opportunities, and to giv3 them an intelligent 
Christian faith. One of the most frequent moral lapses among 
them is stealing. Could there be any connection between their in- 
come and this tendency toward dishonesty? Let our church mem- 
bers feel a Christian responsibility to see that they receive reason- 
able compensation for their work. 

Crime is an old topic in our meetings but with a new urgency 

18 



Minutes Of The Little River Baptist Association 

today. The annual cost of crime in the United States would build 
70,000 bombing planes, enough to turn the tide in this war, if we 
had the planes immediately. The age of prisoners is decreasing 
alarmingly. In the last few years it has decreased from 26 years 
to 23 years in North Carolina. Crime is increasing infinitely faster 
than population. The challenge to our churches is self-evident. 

A word of caution is in order regarding the practice of gam- 
bling in our State. We commend the work of our courts in sup- 
pressing many of the gambling devices and convicting^ their purvey- 
ors, but like liberty, the price of public morality is eternal vigilance, 
and it behooves all of us to be alert to the quiet efforts of these 
evil forces to resume their nefarious business. 

Is there an obligation on our churches arising from the multi- 
tudinous youthful marriages accompanying the war? News agen- 
cies and social forces are reporting that many of these early mar- 
riages are proving quite temporary and are bringing great mental 
suffering to the couples involved and to their parents. Christian 
guidance through our church organizations might lead many of our 
young people to guard against ' speedy decisions, which are often 
void of seasoned consideration and born of war's emotions. 

Another dangerous trend in our current life is to soft-pedal 
discussion of our moral obligation to enter into a broader and deep- 
er world relationship at the close of the war. It is the duty of every 
Christian to think and to talk and to plan now for a world brother- 
hood under God, and to pray for the hastening of the time when 
/'every knee shall bow and every tongue confess that Jesus Christ 
is Lord to the glory of God the Father." 

Let us follow the gleam pointed out by that prince of Chris- 
tian statesmen, Woodrow Wilson, and lead this world to the blessed 
altar of conciliation, mutual respect, and clear understanding. 
Any other path will soon lead again to a war which will take the 
remainder of the world's manhood and womanhood into universal 
destruction. I cannot refrain from expressing here a deep apprecia- 
tion of the splendid contribution of Mr. Wendell Willkie, who lasi 
evening by radio repeated his frequent call to our people every- 
where to grasp the great opportunity to lead the human race to a 
better, kinder, more Christian world. May the Prince of Peace 
give power to his message. 

TEMPERANCE 
A rum manufacturer is said to have exclaimed, after the repeal 
of the Eighteenth Amendment, that he wondered how long now the 
fanatics would continue their opposition to the sale of intoxicating 
liquors. The answer is just as long as it exists in our world. The 
following quotation concerning activities of the Woman's Christian 
Temperance Union was copied from the High Point Enterprise and 
quoted by the Raleigh Times for October 22, of this year (1942), 

19 



Minutes Of The Little River Baptist Association 

under the caption "Elucidate, Sister Wohl." It reads as follows: 

"Mrs. Helen Robertson Wohl, in her report as legislative chair- 
man, told the Women's Christian Temperance Union that North 
Carolinians will spend over sixty million dollars on beer, wine, 
and whiskey this year." 

Mrs. Wohl's figures we believe are too low — if she is counting 
the many millions of dollars of North Carolina money spent for hard 
liquor in the State's seventy-five "dry" counties each year. 

But we were impressed with her statement that the people of 
the State are spending approximately twice as much on beer, wine, 
and hard liquor as on the public schools. 

The W. C. T. U. organization, she said, 'should maintain a vigi- 
lant watch on the legislative and executive activities of the State 
Board of Alcoholic Control, the Governor's office, and the General 
Assembly on all matters relating to beer, wine, and liquor legis- 
lation.' 

The News and Observer has this to say on the subject, under 
the caption, "It is Bunk." 

"Arthur Gore is right. The provision of the ABC (Alcohol 
Brutalizes Consumers) that it is 'to promote temperance' is a fraud 
and the worst sort of bunk. The big increase in the sales of intoxi- 
cants and the boasting taxpayers is proof that it is intemperance 
and not temperance these joints promote." 

It is a matter of regret that the heads of the War Department 
and the Navy Department have seen fit to oppose the bill recently 
introduced in our Congress to prohibit the sale and consumption of 
liquor in and around our military camps. Our people were particu- 
larly disappointed when Congress "pigeon-holed" Senator Lee's 
worthy bill. Our churches should throw their full influence be- 
hind the bill. As stated by Mr. Josephus Daniels recently, the par- 
ents of the teen age boys could see them drafted for war service 
infinitely easier if they knew that every possible temptation were 
removed from our camps. 

Liquor sales in the nation as a whole are alarming in their in- 
crease. It is reported by the Government that about 5,000,000,000 
pounds of food material were used last year in the manufacture of 
liquor. Sugar alone amounted to about 150,000,000 pounds; and 
about 160,000,00 pounds of molasses were used. Our people are 
ready and anxious to make every sacrifice necessary to the winning 
of the war, but they protest against the revolting system which re- 
quires them to keep sugar from the mouths of their children at 
their own tables in order to supply the "needs" of the hungry dis- 
tillers. Dr. M. E. Dodd of the Social Service Commission of the 
Southern Baptist Convention states that America's drink bill for a 
calendar year is $3,500,000,000, enough to build forty modern bat- 

20 



Minutes Of The Little River Baptist Association 

tleships for the protection of our men in the service and their home- 
land. 

WHAT CAN OUR CHRISTIAN FORCES DO TO IMPROVE THE 

SITUATION? 

1. We must be tolerant with and win those who differ with us 
as to the solution of the drink problem. Many fine citizens have a 
mistaken view as to the best approach. Abuse will never win 
them. 

2. We must study both sides of the question. Unless we arm. 
ourselves with convincing information with which to meet theii 
arguments, we shall always be deprived of potentially pov/erful aid 
of some intelligent Christian soldiers. 

3. We must realize that laws alone do not make men sober 
They are a valuable asset to team with other and m.ore fundamental 
approaches to this social evil; hence, 

4. We mxust turn to educational processes to convince our 
people, young and old, that our way of temperance is the better 
way. The organized temperance movement began in America In 
1-308, and thinking Europeans followed our lead with organized 
movements within the two succeeding decades. Those early efforts 
were based upon education and moral suasion., and it seems to us 
that they had the fundamxental way. 

What are the means at our disposal for educating our people^ 
Some suggestions by Dr. Raymond B. Fosdick are helpful. 

(a). The child's general social situation. It is that which dis- 
tinguishes us from the Japanese or the Germans. It is the first ele- 
ment in the process of education. 

(b.) The influence of the immediate environment in whica 
our youth is growing up. The standards and manners of the little 
circle in which he moves will largely determine his attitude on so- 
cial questions. 

(c.) That intensely interested group we call the family. The 
child is a virtual slave to the views and attitudes of parents, broth- 
ers, and sisters. Their capacity to lead and persuade is practically 
unlimited. 

(d.) The school. It has enormous possibilities for good in 
moulding character. 

A dual report on Associational Evangelism and World 
Missions was read by Charles Howard, pastor of the Buie's 
Creek Church. Before the final adoption of these reports, 

21 



Minutes Of The Little River Baptist Association 

Secretary M, A. Huggins discussed the challenging opportunity 
in North Carolina at this time, greatly expanded by the loca- 
tion of many military camps within the State. Mr. Huggins 
was followed by Rev. James Butler with a verbal report of his 
work in the Wilmington area. 

Report On Evangelism 

. It takes 28 of us Baptists in Little River Association a whole 
year to w^in one soul to Christ. This compares Mrith 29 in the stat-i 
and 21 in the South (1941 figures). We have sent 1600 recruits 
into the armed services of our country. About half of these we pre- 
sume to be Baptists. Thus Baptists have added 1600 to the army of 
our country and 247 (1941) into the army of the Lord. And we 
have in our territory easily 12,000 souls unsaved and unchurched. 

But we rejoice in the evidences of increased interest in the sal- 
vation of the lost at home and abroad. Revival services have been 
held in practically all, if not all, of our churches already this year. 
Evangelistic services are held by Baptist groups in jails, prison 
camps, mission Sunday Schools, and in the County Home. Thous- 
ands of tracts and Scripture portions have been distributed by 
groups of women and young people. In the past ten years we have 
organized four new churches, increased Sunday School enrollment 
from 4,700 to 5,500, B. T. U. enrollment from 700 to 950, and church 
membership from 6,100 to 6,800 (even after drastic revision of some 
church rolls involving the loss of several hundred members). 

On the other hand we must remind ourselves that we still have 
10 churches with only once-a-month preaching, 10 others with 
only half-time preaching, 12 with no Training Union work, 10 with 
no W. M. U. work, 20 with no weekly prayer meeting, and 25 with 
not a single teacher holding the new Sunday School Diploma. And, 
above all, two-thirds of our own members are not in any kind of 
church service on a given Sunday and 12,000 souls are still lost, 
in Little River territory. 

Respectfully submitted, 
Charles Howard 

Report On Missions 

Most of us are doubtless making some effort to assist our na- 
tion in its war effort, and that is as it should be. But it may do us 
good to reflect that Missions would have been a better way to ob- 
tain the ends we seek now through war. We propose to spend 60 
billions per annum in the war effort, and more as the war con- 
tinues. There are in round numbers in Italy 40 million people, in 
Germany 80 million, in Japan 60 million — a total of 180 million. 
Allowing four persons to the family, we would have 45 million fam- 

22 



Minutes Of The Little River Baptist Association 

ilies. Divide this into 60 billion dollars, and you get as a quotient 
the sum of $1,300 plus. We could send and maintain for the dura- 
tion a missionary for every family in the three axis nations for what 
we are spending to fight them! 

We are spending over $300 per year for every individual in 
our enemy countries and over $400 for every individual in our ov^n 
country. But v^e Baptists are offering (in Little River) $1.80 capita 
per year for all sorts of missions everywhere, all work outside ouv 
own local churches. This compares with $1.33 in the South and 
$1.68 in the state. To all causes we give in Little River $6.90 pe^ 
member, compared with $7.91 in the South and $5.58 in the state. 

We believe that missions is still a better way and urge all our 
people to bring abundant tithes and offerings out of our increased 
wealth. 

Respectfully submitted, 
Charles Howard 

G. G. Page briefly reported upon the American Bible So- 
ciety and urged the churches to place this worthy cause in their 
budgets for the coming year. 

Report On American Bible Society 

In lieu of a written report G. G. Page gave a short discussion of 
the needs of the American Bible Society. He referred to the re- 
ports of last year, the adoption of which committed the churches 
of the Association to an agreement to include the Society in their 
financial plan of the year. The churches by the adoption of the re- 
port agreed either to include the Society in the church budget or to 
take a special offering for that purpose sometime during the year. 
A show of hands indicated that the majority of the churches did 
neither and made no contribution to the cause whatsoever. 

The great need of the Society in furnishing the Scriptures to 
the chaplains in the armed forces and to the peoples of occupied 
countries was presented anew and a plea for financial support of 
the cause urged. 

The work of Christian Education in our Baptist Colleges 
was presented in a well-written report by R. L, Poplin, Dean of 
Cambpell College. 

Report On Our Baptist Colleges 

Our Baptist colleges are rendering a highly valued service t3 
their constituencies. The total enrollment is somewhat lower than 
that of even date last year. This is, we feel, due to the influences 
of the present world conflict. Wake Forest College has fewer stu- 
dents but apparently has about as many as she can accommodate 
after having allotted certain of her buildings to the use of the Army 

23 



Minutes Of The Little River Baptist Association 

Finance School. The enrollment at the other institutions is substan- 
tially the same as a year ago with the possible exception of Chowan 
College. Unofficial information from there indicates a decreased en- 
rollment. 

There are many facts that loom on the horizon which tena 
to disturb the peace and enquanimity of mind among students, es- 
pecially among the young men of draft age. However we feel en- 
couraged that our colleges have not as yet suffered the decrease in 
enrollment which they experienced during World War No. 1. So 
far as the writer is able to learn the general spirit on the campuses 
is good. 

At least four of our colleges which enroll young men have been 
chosen by the War Department to offer training for men enlisted in 
the reserve of the different branches of our armed forces. Under 
this arrangement young men from 18 to 26 years of age may be al- 
lowed to remain in college for a period of from two to four years 
from the date of their first enrollment in college, unless the exigen- 
cies of the war make it necessary for the Secretary of V/ar to call 
out all the reserves. Two of these colleges had to offer one or more 
courses which they had not been offering in order to meet the needs 
of this group of students. Our colleges are to be commended for 
taking these steps which enable them to serve the government and 
the young men in a finer way during this time when the very foun- 
dations of our way of life are being so seriously threatened. 

There are some factors that are less encouraging. Among stu- 
dents there is an increasing tendency to plan for a shortened edu- 
cational career. Instead of entering college with the intention of 
completing the four- year course many of them are expressing the 
purpose to take a short course of specialized training and hasten 
into employment. This is the unmistakable evidence of influences 
which are beyond our control. However we shall have to expect 
a college generation with a very incomplete education unless we 
are to bring these pupils back into our colleges after the war, for 
the completion of their training. 

I have already cited enough facts to show you clearly that con- 
ditions are not normal on our campuses, as indeed they cannot and 
ought not to be in a time when our nation is undergoing such a 
crisis. It is not too early for us to begin to make plans for the fu- 
ture. We must win this war and then the peace which is to follow. 
We simply must not repeat the mistakes we have made followin-^ 
other wars. With each war becoming more and more destructive 
to property and human life there is a limit to the number that the 
human race can survive. Our colleges have a grave responsibility 
now and immediately following the war. It is our duty to do the 
utmost to win the war and help in the establishment of a righteous 
peace. Nothing less than this will guarantee a lasting peace. 

24 



Minutes Of The Little River Baptist Association 



Facing these challenges America must build for permanence. 
We must build a finer more socially responsible world than we have 
ever known. We must assume now responsibilities in the war and 
in the peace to follow. This making of peace is to be a difficult job. 
It is going to require all the ingenuity and knowledge and Christian 
principles America can muster. Our Christian Colleges must not 
fail the present or future generations. 

It is not my purpose to belittle the contribution that is being 
made by the tax-supported schools. We need and must have their 
assistance. We must, in my judgment, preserve our distinct but 
dual educational system. It is unsafe for us to depend upon either 
the tax or church-supported schools alone. Germiany had a most 
highly recognized university sj^stem, yet she produced a Hitler and 
a most destructive world war. Intellectualism and knowledge alone 
are not enough. People m.ust learn how to live with one another. 
It is the responsibility of the church-related schools to aid in the 
planning for this future world order. 

This suggests that it might be in order for us to reexamine our 
educational system. Education began under church auspices in 
America and continued there for a century and a half. In fact, it 
was only about 20 years ago that tax-supported schools came to have 
enrollments and revenues to match that of the private and church- 
related schools. Witness the trend since 1920, however. In our 
Southland our Baptist schools and colleges have decreased from 119 
to 65 in num_ber. Dr. William J. McGlothlin shocked us about a 
dozen years ago when he made the statement that he did not be- 
lieve our denominational schools would survive 25 years. We will 
have to admit that the church is no longer the leader in education. 
I would not predict that our church schools are to perish. If we as- 
sume that they cannot fail, we shall be in grave danger of losing 
them however. They now have many difficulties to overcome. 
Pres. F. W. Boatwright of the University of Richmond outlines some 
of them. 1. The outreach of denominational interest and benefi- 
cience to cover a growing number of worthy causes in addition to 
the three earlier objectives of the church, namely, the local church, 
missions, and education. 2. The drop in interest rates which has 
cut income from endowments almost in half. 3. The tax policy 
of the federal government which has steadily cut down private 
philanthropy. 4. Vast- grants of Federal money to tax-supported 
schools for new buildings and equipment. 5. And pressure of reg- 
ulatory agencies, which, however praiseworthy, have often been 
embarrassing. 

The question probably arises in the mind of some, why not 
abandon the field of college education to the government as we have 
already done in the fields of primary and secondary education? In 

25 



Minutes Of The Little River Baptist Association 

answer to this President Boatright says, "I hold firmly to the opin- 
ion that these church-related colleges are still making a definite and 
invaluable contribution both to churches and to our democratic way 
of life. It would be an unspeakable calamity for them to disappear 
or to become inefficient through lack of financial support. They art 
still, as they have always been, leadership-institutions. They are 
fountains of idealism in a defeatist epoch in history. They train a 
large portion of the ministers, missionaries, and other outstanding 
relgious leaders; a well known Presbyterian Secretary of Education 
says at least 85 per cent of them. The churches themselves would 
fare ill if their colleges should disappear or should deteriorate 
through lack of financial support." William Allen White said, "Un- 
less the churches of America support the right sort of colleges for the 
training of leaders, this country under another leadership will close 
the churches." 

Christian colleges have and can still give us wise unselfish 
leadership for church and state as well. It is our patriotic duty tc 
do it. But our institutions are going to require the support of our 
Christian people if we are to supply this needed leadership. Our 
professors cannot write text-books or engage in research to the de- 
gree that the tax-supported professor does for the reason that the 
teaching loads are so heavy that there is not time for it and the 
money with which to purchase the expensive apparatus is not forth- 
coming. Our people "cannot make brick without straw." Let us see 
that they have the material resources to work with. 

The Christian college needs another form of support. Those 
young people of ability and promise ought to be encouraged to at- 
tend the church college. Let our pastors and other religious lead- 
ers seek them out and send them to our colleges. 

Respectfully submitted, 
R. L. Poplin 

A brief statistical report on the progress of Little River 
Baptists was read by G. Scott Turner, Pastor of Erwin and 
Chalybeate Springs Churches. 

Report On State And Condition Of The Churches 

There are twenty-six churches in the Little River Association. 
From the reports presented we find the following facts: 

Number of members last year 6,83& 

Gains 

Baptisms '. 265 

Letters 182 

Statements 9 

Resstorations 25 481 

26 



Minutes Of The Little River Baptist Association 

Losses 

Letters 179 

Exclusions 2 

Erasures 18 

Deaths 48 247 

Net Gain 234 

Present members 7,073 

Total local contributions $38,946.86 

Total denominational contributions 13,148.17 

Grand Total $52,095.03 

Four churches reported a loss in membership during the year. 
Three churches reported no baptisms. 

Respectfully submitted, 
G. Scott Turner 

During the time for the transaction of miscellaneous busi- 
ness the following committees reported. 

Report of Committee on Time, Place and Preacher for the 
next Annual Session was read by Mrs. J. G. Layton, Chairman, 
and was adopted. The report is as follows: 

Time: Tuesday after the fourth Sunday in October. 

Place: Antioch. 

The report of the Committee on Nominations, subsequently 
adopted by the Association, is contained in the Directory found 
on page 5 of these minutes. 

The Resolutions Committee, Charles Howard, Chairman, 
presented the following report: 

Report Of Resolutions Committee 

Be it Resolved: 

First, That the Little River Association state its hearty approval 
of the statesmen who seek to ban the sale of alcohol in the army 
camps of the nation and to remove the vice conditions that threaten 
the morals of our soldiers, and that we pledge our untiring efforts 
along these lines. Further, that we pledge our enthusiastic support 

27 



Minutes Of The Little River Baptist Association 

of the Prohibition movement among Southern Baptists as led by Dr 
John H. Hill. 

Second, That, inasmuch as your committee feel that our Lord's 
cause in this Association may be served by the continuation of such 
a committee as appointed by the Executive-Promotion Committee 
to act in an advisory capacity with the grieved members and for- 
mer members of the Piney Grove Church, we recommend that 
this com.mittee be approved and continued, according to the Mod- 
erator's recommendation. 

Third, That the Association continue the work of our Associa- 
tional Missionary, in the summer of 1943, suggesting quotas for the 
various churches in order to raise the necessary funds. We further 
recommend that the Association investigate the possibility of a co- 
operative plan between us and the State Mission Board, looking to- 
ward a full-time program in 1944. We would suggest that the Mod- 
erator appoint a committee to be in charge of both these items. 

Fourth, That the Ministerial Relief committee recommended by 
the Moderator be appointed. 

Fifth, That we rejoice in the coming of Dr. L. L. Carpenter to 
the editorship of the Biblical Recorder, and that we urge that a 
club of subscribers be formed in every church having none, and 
that efforts be put forth to enlarge clubs already existing. 

Sixth, Taking cognizance of the troubled and confused age in 
which we are living, we strongly urge all our churches and all our 
people to confess our sins to God, renew our vovv^s to Him_, and un- 
ceasingly work and pray for guidance and for the blessing of a God- 
honoring victory and peace, acknowledging that any peace or victory 
without God is worse than defeat. We feel that not to advance for 
Christ in this day is high treason, and therefore urge that we lay 
our all upon the altar of His service through our local churches. 

Seventh, That we express our love and gratitude to our Mode- 
rator and other officers of the Association, and to Miss Zula Rog- 
ers, our Associational Missionary, for their untring efforts during 
the year now closing. We further recommend that the volume of 
minutes to be published of this year's work and proceedings be 
dedicated to Miss Rogers. 

Respectfully submitted, 
C. B. Howard, Chm. 
A. S. Lamm 
C. E. Ruff in 
The report of the Resolutions Committee was adopted as 
read, except that by amendment the Association voted to en- 
large the scope of activities of the Committee on the Piney 
Grove Church to include cooperation with all groups involved 
in the controversy. Standing vote by churches was called for 

28 



Minutes Of The Little River Baptist Association 



on the appointment of the above-named Committee by the Pas , 
tor of the Piney Grove Church. All churches present voted for 
the appointment of the Committee except Piney Grove. 

After announcements, upon motion, the Association ad- 
journed to meet in its final session at 7:45 p. m. 

Evening Session 

After another sumptuous meal served by the host church, 
the evening service opened at 7:45 with the singing of "Sweet 
Hour of Prayer." Ford A. Burns, pastor of the Neill's CreeR 
Church, led in prayer. 

The attention of the smaller assembly of the delegates and 
visitors was directed to the work of the principal auxiliary or- 
ganizations of the church. The report on the Baptist Training 
Union, prepared by the Associational Training Union Director, 
George Williams, now in the armed services of his country, was 
read by the Clerk of the Association. Inspirational talks on 
the progress of training in the churches were made by Rev. 
Sam F. Hudson and Miss Zula Rogers. 

Baptist Training Union Report 

It is with some joy and gladness that we record some progress 
made in the Training Program of the Little River Association dur- 
ing the past year. I urge you to forget that past and seek to press 
onward with the organization that has the greatest possibilities of 
any organization in the Little River Association. Our Baptist 
Training Union offers us our greatest challenge to carry on its work 
of building Christian character. 

Some of our accomplishments are as follows: 

1. On November 25, 1941, our One-Day Associational Training 
Union Conference was held in Lillington for the afternoon and night. 
Miss Helen Gardner of Nashville, Tennessee, Rev. James Sapp of 

■Raleigh, and Mrs. Ford A. Burns of Fuquay Springs, were pres- 
ent to lead the discussion groups and conferences. As a result of 
this meeting all of us were better able to go back to our several 
churches to carry on our work. The Lillington church served sup- 
per to the 135 delegates who attended, and we all felt that the 
meeting was a great success. 

2. Our Annual meeting, which was a reorganization meeting, 
was held in Lillington a year ago. At this time a full set of offi- 
cers was elected to serve. The principal speaker for this meeting 
was the Rev. Sam F. Hudson, pastor of the Lillington church, wh' 
was also elected Pastor-Adviser for the Association. 

29 



Minutes Of The Little River Baptist Association 

3. At the Regional meeting held in Wendell in April several 
of our churches were well represented and many were outstanding 
in several of the contests. We had three winners in these contests: 
Miss Emily Frances Altman of Dunn who won out in the Junior 
Memory Work contest; Miss Rosaleene Stephenson of Angler who 
won out in the Intermediate Sword Drill; and Mrs. H. B. Patterson 
of Broadway, member of the Holly Springs church, who won out in 
the Adult Scripture Reading contest. We congratulate these three 
winners. 

4. We have managed to gain nearly 200 new members in the 
past year to add to our ranks of those "studying to show themselves 
approved unto God, workmen that need not to be ashamed, rightly 
dividing the word of truth." 

5. In spite of the tire and gasoline shortage we have man- 
aged to meet at regular intervals and have a representative body 
present at each meeting to dispense with any business which might 
come before the group. 

6. Our churches with Training Unions have in several cases 
held and had their members to study the annual books for our 
Study Course awards. 

The Director would like to express his thanks to Truby A. 
IPowell, Associate Director, Miss Jennie Campbell, Secretary- 
Treasurer, Rev. Sam F. Hudson, Pastor-Adviser, Miss Zula Rog- 
ers, Associational Missionary, and all of the others that have been 
helpful to him in carrying on this program this past year. Without 
their prayers and understanding the Director would have been at a 
loss as to what to do at many times. It is really these who deserve 
the credit for what has been done in this department during the 
past year. 

The Director recommends, with the approval of the Association, 
that a table be placed in the minutes to indicate the work of the 
Training Union Department in the past year. This will assist work- 
ers through the year in keeping in touch with all of the work m 
each of the several churches. 

The work in the Unions during the year has been greatly im- 
proved. Some o£ the improvements that have been most noticeable 
have been in the following churches: Kennebec, Swann's Station", 
Broadway, Friendship, Dunn, Angier and Lillington. All of the 
churches with organized work have shown improvement, but these 
were the most noticeable. We have the following units to date. 
There are sixteen churches and one college department, which re- 
port 61 Training Union units. 

The Baptist Training Union is a definite part of the Christian 
Educational program of a Baptist church. It desires and deserves 
its rightful place in the hearts and thinking of our people in our 
several churches. Elect a Director who sincerely believes that and 

30 



Minutes Of The Little River Baptist Association 

our Baptist Traning Union will continue to grow in numbers and 
for His service. 

Respectfully submitted, 
George W. Williams 

Attention was next focussed upon the Sunday School and 
its important place in Kingdom work. Truby Powell, Associa- 
tional Sunday School Superintendent, read the report which 
was unanimously adopted after discussion by Mrs. C. D. Bain. 

Report On Sunday School Work 

The Sunday School work in the Little River Association this 
past year has been somewhat handicapped because of the superm- 
tendent's leaving about the middle of the year to work with the State 
Mission Board. But under his fine leadership we made a great deal 
of progress. 

With a growing feeling, among the Christian leaders and lay- 
men of our association, that we fell far short of reaching our peo- 
ple for the Sunday School, we decided to invite Mr. L. L. Morgan 
with his co-workers to help in an Enlargement Campaign. So on 
April 29 a Sunday School Enlargement Campaign was launched, 
with 16 churches participating, resulting in a larger increase in Sun- 
day School attendance. There were 157 awards issued, an increase 
of 94 over last year. We have two Sunday Schools that reached 
the Standard during 1942, Angier and Dunn, and a few others thai, 
are almost Standard. Twenty-five churches with one mission 
school conducted a Vacation Bible School during the year. We have 
at present 26 churches with Sunday Schools and three mission Sun- 
day Schools, totaling 29. Angier organized a mision Sunday School 
this year. 

Our problem is keeping the enthusiasm we build up and the 
visions we catch during an Enlargement Campaign and the like, 
from September to September. Paul says, "Morever, it is required 
in stewards that a man be found faithful" (1 Cor. 4:2). We must 
be faithful in using] our enthusiasm and vision for a continual growth 
in our Sunday School work. I should like to recommend four things: 

1. That the 16 churches who had training courses last year, 
along with the other 10 who did not, plan for training classes as 
soon as possible. 

2. That we have 5 or more Sunday Schools join with Angier 
and Dunn in becoming Standard this year. 

3. That as many Sunday Schools as can possibly do so foster 
a Mission Sunday School. 

31 



Minutes Of The Little River Baptist Association 

4. That we organize a wide-awake church library with plenty 
of good reading for all ages. 

Respectfully submitted, 
Truby A. Powell 

Mrs. Charles Howard, W. M. U. Superintendent for the 
Little River Association, read a stirring report upon W. M. U. 
activities for the past year. Mrs. I. K. Stafford, also of Buie's 
Creek, introduced by Mrs. Howard, made a strong appeal for 
greater missionary endeavor. 



W. M. U. Report To Little River Association 
Angier Chnrcli — 1942 

As new superintendent of our W. M. U. work, I wish to ex- 
press love and gratitude to Mrs. S. D. Whittenton for her faithful 
and efficient service as superintendent for a number of years, and 
for her helpfulness and encouragement to me as I have sought to 
know and perform m^y duties as her successor, I express gratitude 
to all our workers for their splendid cooperation throughout the 
year, and with joy and gratitude to Him who has guided and bless- 
ed us through the year, I bring this report. 

Our missionary organization has been motivated by the es- 
sence of this prayer, its watchword for 1942, "O send out Thy light 
and Thy truth, let them lead me," as through multiplied activities 
it has served to shed abroad the light of life. It is difficult to meas- 
ure the extent to which we have succeeded, for it is not possible 
to measure spiritual results always. Some facts, however, will help 
us to know some successes and some failures. 

We report 16 churches having W. M. U. organizations. Fourteen 
of these have at least one organization for young people. Seven 
of them are full-graded W. M. U.'s; that is, they have all 5 of the 
young people's organizations. There are in the association a total 
of 69 organizations. One entire W. M. U., Dunn, attained the high 
standard of A-1 for 1941, Chalybeate Springs almost reached the 
same worthy goal. Eleven other unit organizations were A-1. 

There has been a steady improvement in most phases of our 
work. Mission Study has advanced. We report three Schools oE 
Missions and 76 mission study classes. Last year we reported 51 
classes. Miss Alda Grayson, one of our missionaries home from 
North China, taught us and greatly blessed us in an associationai 
Mission Study Class in Lillington in December. We are grateful 
for our splendid Mission Study Library that has been developed, 

32 



Minutes Of The Little River Baptist Association 

maintained, and used under the direction of Mrs. R. F. Hall, our 
Mission Study Chairman, who is resigning to serve the Raleigh Di- 
vision in the same capacity. 

Some Personal Service has been attempted on an association- 
w^ide scale, as in an organized v^ay, we have carried on a continu- 
ous program of witnessing and seeking to win souls in the County 
Home, Prison Camp, and Jail. We feel sure that some personal 
witnessing has been done in each church community also. 

We are profoundly grateful for the fine response to the call 
for increased gifts this year. We have advanced in stewardship 
Last year we failed to reach our goal of $360 for the 100,000 Club. 
Already at the end of the third quarter of this year's work we have 
exceeded our goal of $635, by laying on the altar, for this debt- 
paying purpose, $707.41. We shall continue to strive for a debtless 
denomination, for we know that we must do our best, that we be 
not handicapped by debt when our day of golden opportunity for 
world-wide evangelism shall again dawn. We have given in these 
three quarters $2,396.24 through the Cooperative Program. Our 
total gifts for three quarters amount to $3,702.69. This includes ah 
our gifts to missions and benevolences, but does not include the 
gifts of our women and young people to local expenses of the- 
churches. 

We feel happy to report good things attempted in the Mas- 
ter's name, but we know that as "laborers together with God" we 
are failing to send out as effectively and earnestly as we ought His 
light and truth into our world, so dark with sin and suffering. There 
are more women and young people in the churches having W. M. 
U. not enlisted than are enlisted. There are 10 churches in our 
Association with no W. M. U. work. There are only 127 tithers re- 
ported among our more than 1000 members. How large might our 
gifts be if we learned to bring all the tithes into God's storehouse! 
Many souls are at our very doors still lost in sin. For the many 
boys still in our midst, most of whom will soon be enlisted in the 
service of our country and sent to the nations of the world, there 
are only 13 R. A. organizations to help them catch the true concept 
of the Christian's obligation to a torn and bleeding world. 

We praise the Lord for the gains we have made, seek His for- 
giveness for our failures, and pray for His guidance as we labor on 
in His name. Ae we look on the field of a world in poignant need, 
without light, it calls us to a reconsecration of ourselves, our time, 
our talents, our money, our all. 

May we pray yet more fervently the prayer of the Psalmist, 
"O send out Thy light and Thy truth, let them lead me!" 

Respectfully submitted, 

Mrs. Charles B. Howard 

33 



Minutes Of The Little River Baptist Association 

With the completion of this annual review of the year's 
work as a basis for new plans and greater endeavor, the Sixty- 
Seventh Session of the Little River Association adjourned. 

MINUTES OF ANNUAL MEETING 
WOMAN'S MISSIONARY UNION, LITTLE RIVER" 
ASSOCIATION - 
Lilliegton Baptist Church, Sept. 3, 1942 
Theme: 'lighted to Lighten." 

The meeting was called to order by the Superintendent 
Mrs. Charles. B. Howard. 

The Watchword was repeated in unison, followed by prayer 
by Mrs. Howard. 

Hymn: 'The Light of the World is Jesus."- 

The devotional was led by Mrs. L. J. Atkinson of Antioch^ 
who used Matthew 5:Pr'16 and Isaiah 60:1 as the basis for her 
remarks. 

Mrs. J. G. Layton, Sr., of Lillington extended words of 
welcome and Mrs. L. E. Johnson of Angier, speaking for Mrs. 
A. L. Overby, responded. 

The printed program was adopted as the order of the day. 

Appointment of committees follows. 

Committee On Nominations 
Mrs. H. W. Whittenton 
Mrs. G. Scott Turner 
Mrs. L. E. Johnson 
Mrs. William Morgan 
Mrs. Hugh Johnson 

Committee On Time And Place 

Mrs. R. F. Hall 
Mrs. H. M. O'Quinn 
Mrs. D. J. Patterson 
Mrs. W. P. Surles 
Mrs. Furman Andrews 

34 



Minutes Of The Little River Baptist Association 

Committee On Resolutions 

Mrs. C. G. Fuquay 
Mrs. Paul Bradley 
Mrs. Rex Johnson 

Recognition of visitors — Mrs. J. S. Farmer and Mrs. W. I). 
Briggs of Raleigh, Associational pastors and visitors. 

Reports were heard as follows: 

MISSION STUDY 
Mrs. R. F. Hall reported that there had been much progress in 
mission study among all groups. The books of the library are being 
used by the various organizations. Total number of mission study 
classes for the year is 1,069. Schools of missions were held at Dunn 
Buie's Creek, and Angier, all of v^/hich reached the standard. 
PERSONAL SERVICE 
Mrs. S. F. Hudson's report v/as made by Rev. Sam F. Hudson. 
Most of the W. M. U. organizations are actively engaged in personal 
service. Personal service is Christ-like living tov/ard these around 
us. We may do many kinds of church work, but only as we contact 
personally those about us, are we actually meeting the require- 
ments! It is the greatest kind of work with soul-winning as the 
\ ultimate aim.. 

STEWARDSHIP 
Miss Lillian Draughon encouraged us to be good stewards iirst 
of the Gospel, followed by our time, talents, service, prayers, and 
possessions. The Hundred Thousand Club has already paid $521.- 
29 as compared with the total gifts of $559.61 for last year. The debc 
must be paid by 1943, if possible. Dunn reports two centennial 
memberships. The number of tithers is small. 
MARGARET FUND 
Mrs. J; H. Butler's report, read by Miss Mattie Bain, asked that 
we continue our loyal support to this worthy cause. Through the 
Burney Fund we can contribute to the help of the students, and also 
add personal touches such as candy, cakes, letters, etc. All churches 
were asked to contribute as much as $3 to the Burney Fund every 
year. 

Mrs. Briggs, speaking for Mrs. Pittman, asked that we make an 
offering at the close of the meeting toward this fund. 
TRAINING SCHOOL 
Mrs. C. K. Smith brought to us the work of the Training School 
and urged that we always remember to make an offering during 
August for this school. Miss Ella Gravitte of Roxboro is attending 
the Training School on the Layton Scholarship and Miss Sarah Ka- 
noy of Greensboro holds the Edna R. Harris Scholarship. 

35 



Minutes Of The Little River Baptist Association 

WHITE CROSS 
Mrs. A. C. Barefoot spoke for Mrs. R. L. Young on this work. 
She urged that a White Cross Chairman be appointed in each socie- 
ty and make the hospital report through the White Cross, which is 
no longer considered personal service work. 

LITERATURE 

Mrs. J. G. Layton, Sr., urged that we place in our homes the 
very best literature so as to keep well informed as to world condi- 
tions. She presented copies of all church papers and magazines 
and asked that we place our subscriptions in case we did not ai- 
)j:eady take these papers. 

ROLL CALL OF SOCIETIES 

Angier, Antioch, Broadway, Buie's Creek, Coats, Chalybeate 
Springs, Dunn, Erwin, Friendship, Harmony, Holly Springs, Lilling- 
ton, Neill's Creek, and Swann's Station responded with reports. 
$2-8.15 was reported for the Progress Fund. 

PRESIDENT'S REPORT 

Mrs. Charles Howard made her report and told us that gains 
had been made along many lines and especially in stewarship. The 
total gifts to missions amounts to $5,488.27, and there were during 
the year 127 tithers. 

All reports were adopted. 

Mrs. J. S. Farmer, the new State W. M. U. President, was 
present and gave a most inspiring and uplifting message on 
"Led in Paths of Light." 

Announcements were made and after a closing prayer by 
Mrs. Farmer the meeting adjourned until after lunch. 
Afternoon Session 

Hymn: "Send the Light." 

Devotional was led by Mrs. S. D. Whittenton. The Scrip 
tures she used were John 8:11 and Matthew 5:13-17. 

An open forum was conducted by Mrs. W. D. Briggs of 
Raleigh on W. M. U. methods and problems. 

Special Music was rendered by five Dunn girls: Misses 
Elizabeth Whittenton, Sara Beth Dail, Eleanor Dickey, Mar- 
garet McLean and Anne Fitchett. The girls were accompanied 
by Mrs. H. W. Whittenton. 

Mrs. Charles Skinner of Dunn gave the report of the 
Young People's work in th;e absence of Mrs. Fryer. The report 
was adopted. 

S6 



Minutes Op The Little River Baptist Association 

Mrs. W. E. Nichols spoke for the Sunbeams. She urged us 
to love and foster the work of this group. 

Miss Lola O'Quinn presented a group of junior girls in a 
demonstration. Sue Dell McDonald of Chalybeate Springs, who 
has attained the rank of "Queen of the Scepter," told us of her 
work in the G. A. organizations. She displayed samples of hef 
attainment. Mrs. J. S. Farmer congratulated her and presented 
her the scepter. 

Rev. L. J. Atkinson represented the R. A. organization and 
told briefly of the work this group is doing. 

Miss Virginia Womble spoke for the Y. W. A.'s on "Turn- 
ing many to Righteousness." She explained how necessary it 
is for all young women in this auxiliary to be active in the 
Lord's work. 

Hymn : "O Zion Haste." 

Following a message by Mrs. Ford A. Burns Fuquay 
Springs, "Lights that Burn," announcements were made. 

The reports that were made follow. 

Report Of Nominating Committee 

Associational Supt. Mrs. Charles Howard, Buie's Creek 

Assistant Supt. Mrs. J. A. McLeod, Dunn 

Young People's Leader Miss Ophelia Matthews Chalybeate Springs 

Mission Study Chairman Mrs. Durham Taylor, Dunn 

Personal Service Chm. Mrs. S. F. Hudson, Lillington 

Stewardship Chairman Miss Lillian Draughon, Chalybeate Springs 

Training School Chm. Mrs. C. K. Smith, Dunn 

Margaret Fund Chairman Miss Mattie Bain, Coats 

Literature Chairman Mrs. J. G. Layton, Sr., Lillington 

White Cross Chm. Mrs. Robert Young, Angler 

Secretary and Treasurer Mrs. L. H. Campbell, Buie's Creek 

Report of Resolutions Committee 

A report was made expressing gratitude for the leadership of 
the Associational officers, for the splendid hospitality and fellowship, 
and for the program of the day. 

Report Of Committee On Time And Place 

This Committee reported the acceptance of an invitation from 
the Coats Baptist Church to meet on Tuesday after the first Sunday 
m September in 1943. 

37 



Minutes Of The Little River Baptist Association 

The Financial Report was made and adopted. 

A motion was made and accepted, whereby all reports of the 
day were adopted. 

Another motion was made and carried that our Superinten- 
dent, Mrs. Charles B. Howard, use part of the Progress Fund 
for paying her traveling expenses. 

The minutes of both the morning and the afternoon session 
were read and approved. 

Mrs. Durham Taylor, Acting Secretary for Mrs. L. H. Camp- 
bell, was requested to write Mrs. Campbell a note of sympathy 
irom the Association incident to the passing of her brother, Mr. 
Edward Green. 

The meeting closed with an impressive Memorial Service 
led by Mrs. D. B. Andrews. 



38 



Our Departed Loved Ones 


ANGIER— 


ERWIN— 


Mrs. Tunie Pate 


Mr. W. J. Godwin 


Mrs. J. W. Currin 


Mrs. Iris Byrd Howard • 




Mr. W. V. Wheeler 


ANTIOCH— 






FRIENDSHIP— 


Mrs. S. A. Powell 


Miss Mary Helen Allen 


Miss Lillie Davis 


Mr. R. R. Byrd 


' BAPTIST CHAPFT.— 


Deacon F. C. Hobbs 


Mr. J. R. Howard 


HARMONY— 




Mr. Houston Haire 


BAPTIST GROVE— 




Mrs. Manda Baker 


HOLLY SPRINGS 


Mrs, Millie Baker 


Mrs. Susie C. McNeill 




Mr. A. G. Rogers 


Mrs. Azrilla Blanchard 


Deacon W. T. Wilson 


Mr. J. A. Gilbert 






LILLINGTON— 


BETHEL— 


Mrs. Delia McNeill 


Mr. D. W. West 


Mr. A. G. Rickman 


Mr. W. G. West 


Mr. Allen Shaw 


BUIE'S CREEK— 


MACEDONIA— 


Mr. William J. Ennis 


Mrs. Lula Stephenson 


Mrs. Leslie Turlington 


Mr. A. L. Truelove 


Mrs. Lillie B. Woods 






Mrs. Ida Weathers 


CHALYBEATE SPRINGS— 


Mr. J. K. Weathers 


Mr. Douglas Puryear 


NEILL'S CREEK— 


DUNN— 


Mrs. Isabelle Matthews 


Mr. W. J. Hodges 


OAK GROVE— 


Mrs. Mattie Jones 


Miss Alice Denton 




Mrs. Jim Denton 


Mr. Allen H. A. Lee 




Mrs. J. Eldridge Lee 


PINEY GROVE— 




Mrs. I. L. Howell 


Mr. A. E. Norris 






Mrs. A. L. Keith 


Mrs. George F. Pope 






SW ANN'S STATION— 


Deacon J. O. Suggs 






Mrs. Annie Leslie 



39 



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Hie RiveFBaptist 
Association 

North Carolina 
jy^eighth Annual Session 

IfcHeld With 

iaptist Church 



5Xt session wil 
ith the Hoily 




t944, 



Little River Baptist 
Association 

North Carolina 
Sixty-eighth Annual Session 



Held With 



Antioch Baptist Church 
Mamers, N. C. 

1943 

The next session will be held October 24, 1944, 
with the Holly Springs Baptist Church 



Inde: 



ASSOCIATIONAL PRESBYTERY 8 

ASSOCIATIONAL SUNDAY SCHOOL OFFICERS - 7 

B. T. U. OFFICERS 8 

DIRECTORY OF ASSOCIATION _-_ 6 

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE OF ASSOCIATION 7 

OUR DEAD 28 

PROCEEDINGS BEGIN 9 

REPORTS— 

American Bible Society 19 

B. T. U 26 

Beautification of Church Buildings and Grounds _ 15 

Christian Literature 20 

Constitution Committee 5 

Duncan Chapel 10 

Education 20 

Evangelism 26 

Hospital 13 

Ministers' Retirement Plan 11 

Missions 17 

Moderator's Message Committee 23 

Moderator's Report ^ 9 

Nominating Committee 24 

%? Orphanage 12 

I Resolutions Committee 22 

State of Churches 24 

Sunday School 25 

Temperance 23 

Time, Place and Preacher 22 

W. M. U 18 

STATISTICAL TABLES BEGIN 32 

W. M. U. ANNUAL MEETING 29 



Minutes op the Little River Baptist Association 

REPORT OF COMMITTEE ON CONSTITUTION 

1. This association shall be known as "The Little River Bap- 
tist Association." 

2. The object of this association shall be the advancement of 
tile kingdom of Christ, and the means of accomplishing this shall 
be in strict conformity with the principles of the New Testament. 

3. The association shall have no authority over the internal 
rights of any church belonging to it and shall act only as an advis- 
ory council. 

4. The association shall be composed of messengers chosen by 
the churches connected with it, each church being entitled to five 
delegates. Ordained ministers having oversight of churches in the 
association, or having their membership in these churches, shall al- 
so be received as messengers. 

5. A quorum shall consist of messengers from a majority of 
the churches of the association. 

6. The delegates from each church to the annual meeting of 
the association shall bear a letter certifying their appointment and 
giving an account of the condition of the church and a statement of 
all funds contributed for local and benevolent purposes. 

7. The officers of the association shall be a moderator, a vice- 
moderator, a clerk and a treasurer, who shall be chosen annually 
from the members composing the association, and shall continue in 
office until their successors are elected. The term of office of the 
moderator shall begin at the conclusion of the session at which he is 
elected and continue until the close of the next annual meeting. 

8. It shall be the duty of the moderator to preside during the 
deliberations of the body, to enforce the observance of the consti- 
tution, preserve the decorum, appoint committees except when other 
provisions are made for their appointment, decide all questions of 
order, giving his opinion on any question under discussion, and cast 
the deciding vote in case of a tie. 

9. It shall be the duty of the clerk to record the proceedings 
of each annual meeting of the association, superintend the printing 
of the minutes and their distribution among the churches. 

10. It shall be the duty of the treasurer to receive all funds 
.sent by the churches or collected during the sessions of this body 
and to disburse the same for the objects stated. He shall present a 
report on all funds administered by him at each annual meeting. 

11. The association shall appoint, annually, an Executive-Pro- 
motion Committee, composed of one member from each church in 
the association and the pastors of the churches. The moderator, 
clerk and treasurer shall be ex-officio members of the committee. 
This committee shall have general supervision of the affairs of the 



Minutes of the Little River Baptist Association 

association during the interval between the meetings of the body; 
shall seek to promote the welfare of the churches, and their active 
participation in the causes fostered by the denomination; but shall 
be answerable to the association for its acts, and msike an annual 
report to the association of its work. 

12. The association in annual meeting shall appoint a presby- 
tery of four members, to sit with the pastor of any person whose 
ordination is sought, and the moderator of the association^ to ex- 
amine the qualifications and opportunities for work of the candidate.^ 

13. The association shall hold an annual meeting commencing 
on Tuesday after the fourth Sunday in October and continuing^ 
through the following day. 

14. A meeting of the association may be called by the moder- 
ator at any time by the consent of five members of the Executive- 
Promotion Committee. Each church shall be notified of such a 
meeting in time to send delegates. 

15. This association shall have the right to exclude from its 
membership any church that departs from New Testament principles^ 

16. Any church desiring to become a member of this associa- 
tion may present a petition at the annual meeting of the body 
through delegates appointed for this purpose. If the association shall 
consent to receive such church the moderator shall extend the hand 
of fellowship to the delegates. 

17. The association may invite visitors to seats and extend to 
them all the privileges of delegates except that of voting. 

18. By appointment, at each annual meeting, an introductory 
sermon and a sermon or address on missions shall be delivered. 

19. This constitution may be amended at any annual session^ 
by a vote of two-thirds of the delegates present, provided that no- 
tice shall be given the day previous that such motion will be pre- 
sented. 

Rev. G. Scott Turner read the report, and the Constitution 
was adopted section by section. On motion by J. G. Layton the 
whole Constitution was adopted 1939. 

DIRECTORY OF THE ASSOCIATION 

Moderator L. H. Campbell, Buies Creek 

Vice-Moderator Sam F. Hudson, Lillington 

Clerk-Treasurer Harry D. Wood, Jr., Angier 

Associational Field Worker Miss Zula Rogers, Mamers 

Sunday School Superintendent G. G. Page, Buie's Creek 

Training Union Director Sam F. Hudson, Lillington 

.6 

V 



Minutes of the Little River Baptist Association 

Supt. of Evangelism G. Scott Turner ,Chalybeate Springs 

Christian Literature Chairman Truby Powell, Lillington 

Orphanage Representative C. D. Bain, Dunn 

Missions Chairman Forest Maxwell, Erwin 

Temperance Chairman W. M. Thomas, Broadway 

Hospital Representative Mrs. J. A. Buchanan, Broadway 

Ministers' Annuity Chairman Owen Odum, Coats 

Christian Education Chairman _ B. P. Marshbanks, Buie's Creek 

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE OF THE ASSOCIATION 

Sam F. Hudson Lillington 

Hiarry D. Wood, Jr., Clerk Angier 

G. Scott Turner Chalybeate Springs 

C. E. Ruffin Broadway 

Forrest Maxwell Erwin 

L. E. Atkinson Lillington, Route 3 

Owen Odum Coats 

C. D. Bain Dunn 

Mrs. Chas. B. Howard Buies Creek 

J. G. Layton ,. Lillington 

Harvey Austin Fuquay Springs 

G. G. Page Buies Creek 

ASSOCIATIONAL SUNDAY SCHOOL OFFICERS 

Superintendent G. G. Page, Buies Creek 

Supt. of Evangelism G. Scott Turner, Chalybeate Springs 

Western Group Leader Roger C. Johnson, Mamers 

Southern Group Leader Mrs. Sam Hudson, Lillington 

Eastern Group Leader Bennie Slaughter, Dunn, Rt. 1 

Central Group Leader Mrs. Paul Bradley, Kipling 

Cradle Roll Supt Mrs. C. L. Guy, Dun^n 

Beginner Supt. l Mrs. C. D. Bain, Dunn 

Primary Supt. Mrs. A. L. Overby, Angier 

Junior Supt. Mrs. R. A. Duncan, Dunn 

Intermediate Supt. Mrs. L. E. Johnson, Angier 

Young People's Supt. Thomas Brady, Erwin 

Adult Supt. Miss Mamie Haighwood, Lillington 

Extension Supt. Mrs. E. W. Smith, Fuquay Springs 

7 



Minutes of the Little River Baptist Association 

ASSOCIATIONAL BAPTIST TRAINING UNION OFFICERS 

Director Sam F. Hudson, Lillington 

Associate Director J. W. Holloway, Buies Creek, N. C. 

Secretary-Treasurer Mrs. Truby Powell, Lillington, N. C. 

Pastor Advisor S. L. Morgan, Dunn, N. C. 

Pianist Mrs. Sam F. Hudson, Lillington, N, C. 

Chorister Miss Edith Knight, Broadway, N. C. 

Adult Leader Miss Lillian Draughon, Dunn, N. C. 

Young People's Leader Miss Hazel Matthews 

Intermediate Leader Mrs. E. L. Powell, Mamers, N. C. 

Junior Leader Miss Bessie McNeill 

Story Hour Leader Miss Addie Prevatte, Buies Creek, N. C. 

Eastern Group Leader Miss Egeta Williams, Angier, N. C. 

Central Group Leader __ Miss Beatrice Rawls, Fuquay Springs 

Western Group Leader Miss Irma Knight, Broadway 

Southern Group Leader Truby Powell, Lillington 

ASSOCIATIONAL PRESBYTERY 

L. H. Campbell, Scott Turner, Chas. B. Howard and the 
pastor of the Candidate. 



Minutes of the Little River Baptist Association 



Proceeding's 



The Little River Baptist Association met in its sixty-eighth 
annual session with the Antioch Baptist Church on October 26^ 
1943. 

Moderator L. H. Campbell called the session to order at 
ten o'clock in the morning. The congregation stood and sang. 
"What a Friend We Have in Jesus". Rev. A. S. Lamb, pastor of 
the Oak Grove Baptist Church, read John 4:13-26 and led the 
session in prayer. 

A roll call of churches showed all churches represented with 
the exception of Piney Grove and Rawls. The following order 
for the session's progam was adopted. 

The following officers were elected to serve for this ses- 
sion and the year following: 

Moderator L. H. Campbell, President Campbell Callege^ 

Buies Creek 

Vice Moderator Sam Hudson, Pastor Lillington Baptist 

Church, Lillington 

Clerk and Treasurer Harry D. Wood, Jr., Pastor Angier 

Baptist Church, Angier 

Since Brother Wood was preaching the sermon at the 
morning session. Brother Owen Odum, the former clerk, was 
asked to continue his work through the morning session. 

The Vice Moderator, Sam Hudson, took the chair and asked 
for the moderator's report. This report, in outline, follows: 

OUTLINE OF THE MODERATOR'S REPORT 

1. Suggestion of the advisability of the appointment of an Ex- 
ecutive Committee of twelve. 

2. Encouragement of the part-time churches in our association, 
to form fields v^ith the viev^ of having resident pastors. This in no 
way an attempted criticism of any present churches or pastors. 
Fourteen of our churches have ten different pastors of whom seven 
live outside the association. This represents over half of our 
churches. 

3. Intreaty that we consider the need of and provide for a full 
time missionary. 

9 



Minutes of the Little River Baptist Association 

4. The need for a revision of the constitution. 

5. Suggestion that the churches close their fiscal year on Sept. 
30th, or certainly not later than the second Sunday in October. 

6. Encourage the establishment of courses of Bible in the State 
Schools, these courses sponsored by church groups and conducted by 
well trained Christian leaders. 

7. Affiliation with other Christian Brotherhoods for the ad- 
vancement of common causes; N. C. Council of Churches, etc. 

8. Plan now for advancing the cause of Christ in the Post-War 
World. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Leslie H. Campbell, Moderator. 

o 

This report was accepted as information. Motion made 
and passed to have the Vice Moderator appoint a committee to 
consider this report and bring the association its recommenda- 
tions. Brother Hudson appointed the following committee: Rev. 
Scott Turner, C. W. Flowers, Dr. C. D. Bain, Rev. A. S. Lamm, 
Rev. C. H. Norris, Rev. C. E. Ruffin. 

Visitors from Duncan Chapel, Duncan, N. C, asked to be 
allowed to report on their work for the past year. This report 
follows : 

REPORT OF DUNCAN CHAPEL 

Our Sunday School has grown a lot in the last year. Last year 
we had at the end of the year about -30 on roll. With an average at- 
tendance of 45. Now we report an enrollment of 139 with an avesr^ 
age attendance of 80. 

Our Vacation Bible School had an enrollment of 54 with an av- 
erage attendance of 35. 

We have had two revivals this year. Rev. H. C. Upchurch con- 
ducted the first and Rev. D. L. Temple the latter. In the two reviv- 
als there were about thirty-five people who accepted Christ and 
about half of them followed Christ in Baptism and joit^ed the 
churches of their choice. 

Our Mother's Day offering went to the Baptist Hospital. We 
contributed to the needy families in our community the sum of 
thirty-one dollars. Twenty dollars was given to help rebuild the 
church at Candor, which was destroyed by tornado. 

In the past year we have completed the inside of the church 
and have bought a new Bible for the pulpit. We have bought cur- 
tains for four Sunday School rooms and have a new stove, c^nairs, 
and tables. 

10 



Minutes OF hue Little River Baptist Association 

We have on hand now about $200.00 for some additional build- 
ing. 

We request the prayers of each of you that we may continue to 
grow in the work of our Lord and that we might do His will and 
make our community a better place in which to live. 
Respectfully submitted, 
Duncan Chapel, 
by L. V. Pegram, 
Sunday School Superintendent. 

o 

Mrs. Joel G. Layton submitted the following report: 

REPORT ON MINISTERS' RETIREMENT PLAN 

The Southern Baptist Convention has provided a sound invest- 
ment and administrative agency in the Relief and Annuity Board. 
Dr. George W. Truett says of its amazing growth and development: 
"It reads like a very romance of Divine Providence, as indeed it is." 
The Ministers' Retirement Plan was established to afford ministers 
d sense of economic security for themselves and their dependents 
in old age or disability. 

In North Carolina funds are provided from three sources as fol- 
lows: first, from the minister, 4 per cent of annual salary; second, 
irom the churches they serve, a sirnilar amount annually; third, 
from the State Convention, $18.00 annually. These three funds, 
though mutually related, are kept separate and distinct. 

The amount paid by" the minister is the basis for his contemplat- 
ed annuity contract. Should he die before an annuity has been 
granted, the money he has paid in, with interest thereon, will be ap- 
plied to provide an annuity for his widow or will be paid in one 
5um to a designated beneficiary. 

The accumulated credits of the church and the Convention go 
into a fund for the benefit of the Baptist ministry generally and not 
for any minister specifically. Therefore, though a minister's pas- 
torate may terminate it is essential that there be no break in the 
<:hurch's payments over the years — for this fund is the bulwark of 
the Ministers' Retirement Plan. 

In the Southern Baptist Convention as of March 1, 1943, 10,083 
•churches were cooperating and 7,458 preachers held contracts. 

Forty-nine per cent of N. C. Baptist pastors are members. Lit- 
tle River Association has four pastors enlisted. 

It is recommended that every church in the Association, togeth- 
•er with its pastor, affiliate with the Ministers' Retirement Plan. 
Respectfully submitted, 
Mrs. Joel G. Layton. 

11 



Minutes of the Little River Baptist Association 

Dr. C. D. Bain presented the following report on the work 
of our orphanage and our relation to it. 



REPORT ON ORPHANAGE 

In this group of Baptists, it is unnecessary to say that our Or- 
phanage maintains two homes, the Mills Home in Thomasville and 
the Kennedy Home near Kinston. During the year Rev. W. C. Reed 
has become superintendent of the Kennedy Home. Neither is it ne- 
cessary to remind ourselves that the one chief purpose of the Or- 
phanage is to make worthwhile men and women out of dependent 
boys and girls. The process includes providing food, clothing, shel- 
ter, medical care, schooling, training for approximately 700 children^ 
and calls for the warm-hearted support of all our Baptist people. 

The churches of the Little River Association have given a total 
of $3,350.83 from October 1, 1942, to October 1, 1943, as shown in 
the accompanying chart furnished by our Orphanage treasurer. 

Charity and 



Churches 
Angier 
Antioch 
Baptist Chapel 
Baptist Grove 
Bethel 
Broadway 
Buie's Creek 
Chalybeate Springs 
Coats 

Cumberland Union 
Dunn, First 
Erwin, First 
Erwin, East 
Friendship 
Harmony 
Holly Springs 
Kennebec 
Lajrton's Chapel 
Lillington 
Macedonia 
Neill's Creek 
Oak Grove 
Piney Grove 
Pleasant Memory 





Children 


Contriuhtions 


Subscriptions 


$ 201.06 




136.00 




25.65 


10 


28.17 




13.49 




61.50 


15 


728.00 




231.23 


30 


5.91 




1.25 




698.61 


75 


105.00 


40 


111.75 




106.08 


20 


50.56 


35 


202.64 


40 


26.26 




31.40 




204.78 


12 


50.32 




69.11 




11.22 




120.67 


- 


17.04 





12 



Minutes op the Little River Baptist Association 

Rawls 45.00 

Swann's Station 32.93 10 



Total $3,350.83 297 

It is gratifying to note that every church in our Association 
gave something. Buie's Creek church led in gifts to the Orphanage. 

As Orphanage representative for the association, let me suggest 
three goals by which we may back up the great work of our Or- 
phanage: 

7. Once-a-month Offering from the Sunday School of every 
church in the Association. 

2. Special Thanksgiving Offering from every church in the as- 
sociation. Let "One day's income" be our slogan. 

3. Charity and Children Club in every church in the association. 
We call upon each Sunday School superintendent to be respon- 
sible for promoting these goals in his church. 

Respectfully submitted, 
C. D. Bain 

— o 

Brother J. A. McMillan, representing the Orphanage, spoke 
following the report. He told us of the challenging opportunities 
presented through its work today. 

Brother Albert S. Lamm presented the following report on 
the work of our hospital. 

REPORT ON THE BAPTIST HOSPITAL 

The Baptist Hospital has completed a full year with its enlarg- 
ed facilities. Instead of caring for 4,000 patients as formerly, we 
have had 12,000 the past year — 1942. It is again becoming increas- 
ingly difficult to provide for the growing number of sick who come 
for treatment, an average of 33 each day. 

Of these 12,000 patients who were treated last year, 4,000 were 
service patients; that is, were unable to pay a hospital bill. These 
are the sick for whom our Mother's Day offering is made. It is al- 
so interesting to note that 4,000 of this 12,000 patients were mothers 
who had, here and there in our state, 12,000 children waiting an- 
xiously for her return. We had also about 175 ministers, returned 
missionaries, ministerial students and children from our orphanage, 
for whom no charge was made. 

The Hospital Training School for Nurses has 116 students in 
training, 51 staff and graduate nurses, with an addition of 22 nurses 
and Red Cross Aids, making a nursing staff of 189. 

It is one of the functions of the Baptist Hospital to educate as 

13 



Minutes of the Little River Baptist Association 

many nurses as possible with the Christian ideal of service. These- 
are always selected so as to represent as nearly as possible every 
section of our state. 

Although quite a number of our medical staff are constantly 
going into the service of our country, we still have a staff of about 
75 doctors, almost all of whom are specialists in the several fields 
of medicine and surgery. 

These two institutions — Hospital and Medical School — represent 
a money value to the denomination of $2,000,000.00. 

It is with a just pride, we trust, that the American Medical As- 
sociation has given the Baptist Hospital the highest rating of any 
hospital in the entire south, save one. 

The hospital desires to express to the members of this associa- 
tion its appreciation for the best Mother's Day offering ever, and 
also to the W.M.U.'s and other church agencies this same apprecia- 
tion for their generous contributions of hospital linen. 

This hospital was built and has operated for these 20 years 
with one great fundamental purpose: That it shall be an institution 
through which half a million Baptists of our state may render a def- 
inite Christian service to sick and suffering humanity who could 
not, in most instances, have hospital treatment otherwise. It is the 
purpose of the denomination and the management that it shall for- 
ever remain true to this one purpose in addition to its wider service.- 
Respectfully submitted, 

A. S. Lamm. 


Brother Smith Hagaman, representing the Hospital, spoke 
concerning the possibility of growth in the ministry of the Hos- 
pital. 

The following committeess were appointed by the Modera- 
tor: Committee on Time, Place and Preacher: S. F. Hudson, T.- 
T. Lanier, Harvey Austin. 

Resolutions: M. M. Jernigan, Mrs. J. G. Layton, Mrs. Mar- 
vin Bethune. 

Organization: Charles Howard, Miss Zula Rogers, Miss 
Mattie Bain. 

The annual sermon was delivered by Harry D. Wood, Jr., 
Pastor of the Angier Baptist Church. His text was Hebrews 12:1 
and 2. 

After the sermon Brother C. W. Flowers led in prayer. This 
prayer was also considered our thanks to God for the meal which 
the Antioch Church invited us to share with them. 

14 



Minutes of the Little River Baptist Association 

AFTERNOON SESSION 

Antioch Church served us an ideal dinner. Its abundance 
and goodness made us a little slow in assembling for the after' 
noon session. 

At 2:15 p.m. the association was again called to order as 
we sang "Jesus Keep Me Near the Cross." Rev. G. T. Mills led 
in prayer. 

Prof. J. I. Memory of Campbell College presented the fol- 
lowing paper on the "Beautification of Church Buildings and 
Grounds." 

BEAUTIFICATION OF CHURCH BUILDINGS and GROUNDS 

Beautification of churches and grounds, I believe, is a neces- 
sity for the success of our churches in their present day program. 
Some have said the old church was good enough for Pa and Ma 
and it's good enough for me. We realize that our forefathers hand- 
ed dow^n to us a great heritage. Shall we be satisfied with that 
heritage without adding to it? We no longer go to church in the old 
cart; it's uncomfortable and does not look as good as our new car. 
We have made our homes modern and more beautiful. Why leave 
our churches in their 19th century setting? 

Evil is doing all it can to lure our people away from God by 
making itself more attractive. Therefore, the church must of a ne- 
cessity be made as atractive as possible to cope with this situation. 
Of all the places that need to be beautiful, surely the church should 
come first. We are trying to make our churches the center of their 
respective communities. We are trying to draw the public to the 
house of the Lord, and I believe that a program of beautification 
will bring people to the church that could not be reached by any 
other means. Our churches should be the beauty-spot of our com- 
munities, the pride and center of our lives. 

When we think of beautification of our churches we first think 
of the church itself. Is it well kept? It is comfortable, or is it four 
walls and a roof? Let us look at the architecture, the paint and see 
if the colors harmonize and see if the pews are in harmony with the 
architecture of the building. Do our churches create a worshipful 
atmosphere? Let us move outside of the church and look again at 
the architecture of the building, the roof and the general appear- 
ance of the building. Does it need painting or repair? 

Then we need to note the setting of the church. If our grounds^ 
are not landscaped, we should have plans drawn up to take care of 

15 



Minutes of the Little River Baptist Association 

that problem. We want to see and to save all the natural beauty- 
possible. Some of our churches may need parking space, walks, 
grass, shrubs, or trees. Some may need a part of these, others may 
need all of them. However, we should consider the surroundings of 
the church first. You may have a city lot to landscape or you may 
be fortunate enough to have a rolling hill, a hill-side for a back- 
ground, a brook, valley, or a spreading forest that can be worked in- 
to your plans and add beauty to your project. All of these things 
need to be considered in the general landscaping plans of your 
church. We need to consider all the natural elements of beauty and 
work them into a specific plan of beautification. Our drives and 
parking space should be arranged in a way to be convenient and yet 
not injure the landscape. The walks should be convenient and also 
pleasing in effect, curves can be used that will accent certain spots 
of beauty and make the walk pleasing in itself. 

The entire landscape job needs to be planned to harmonize with 
the setting of the church as well as the architecture of, and the ma- 
terial used in the church itself, because they will determine the 
shrubs to be used. Some shrubs have blooms, some berries, some 
have neither, but all have their place in landscaping your grounds. 
You may need all informal shrubs or some formal or a pleasing 
combination of these. You may want to accent certain lines or 
points ia the building or on the grounds. You may need few shrubs, 
or many. You will want the right number, and kind, of shrubs in 
the proper places. To illustrate this: We would not set a formal 
plant, such as the Irish Juniper, in an oak grove, because it would 
look like a stranger lost in a far away country. 

No two churches or buildings require the same treatment, al- 
though the architecture of the buildings may be the same. 

In starting such a program you will find that some of your peo- 
ple will have plants that they would like to contribute, other plants 
may be found growing in the forests about us. You may need to 
buy some plants, you may need all nursery plants or only a few. 
But where nursery plants are needed, they may be bought at a dis- 
count for churches. 

I would recommend that each church draw up a definite plan 
lor landscaping their grounds and work to that plan. It may be im- 
possible to complete the plan in two or three years, but you will 
have something definite to work to. 

First impressions are often the lasting ones, and we want our 
churches to have a pleasing effect upon the public. We want to at- 
tract the non-Christians to the house of the Lord that they may be 
reached through the services of the church. May people say of our 
church, "It's well kept and a thing of beauty." May the church be 
the pride of our youth; and may our sons return from this war to 

16 



Minutes of the Little River Baptist Association 

a home and church of which they can be proud. The house of the 
Lord should be a place that everyone admires. 
Respectfully submitted, 
J. I. Memory. 

o 

Rev. C. E. Ruffin, of Broadway, presented the report oa 
missions. 

REPORT ON MISSIONS 

Volumes could be written about the efforts and success of our 
missionaries, not to mention the hardships and trials they have ex- 
perienced. Despite the heart-rending experiences and what has ev- 
ery evidence of being a temporary setback, the work goes on. The 
adversaries are many and strong, but the Christian faith rests in the 
assurance that God is mightier than all the evil forces combined, and 
that when the final chapter is written, faith, not force will over- 
come the world. Great and good men, realizing the absolute futility 
of material forces to bring peace to a world now in the darkness of 
confusion, are saying that after this conflict is over, there will be 
manifest as never before the mighty power of God to save a lost, 
world. Therefore, it is our firm conviction that the time was never 
more opportune than the present for the proclamation of the gospel 
of Christ to all the peoples of this world. Throughout the world,, 
the fires of war are raging, evil men are waxing worse and worse, 
and the disregard for the higher relationships of life is alarming. The 
times challenge us! What shall our answer be? What shall be our 
answer to the pitiless cries that call to us for help from the Mace- 
donias of this world. All too long the world has relied upon peace 
treatiesj trade agreements, and international organizations to bring 
peace and good will to this world. This never has, and never will 
be done. Christians have the answer. We must re-emphasize our 
firm belief in the teachings of Christ, and with hearts yearning for 
the salvation of all peoples, endeavor to give to them the Gospel of 
the Prince of Peace. We have the secret that will fill the world with 
joy and cause it to sing with the praise of God. Since this is true 
shall we relax our efforts in the spreading of the gospel throughout 
the world, or shall we begin now to mobilize all our resources, 
looking forward to the day when we can send our messengers of 
truth to the ends of the earth, and by our prayers and gifts maintain 
and support them. 

As an evangelical body, the members of the Little River Asso- 
ciation recommend that: 

1. We use every means at our command to keep our soldiers 
informed about the work at home — letters, tracts, sermons, etc. Ev- 
ery soldier is a potential missionary. 

2. We begin now to enlarge our vision as regards a world-wide 

17 



Minutes of the Little River Baptist Association 

anission endeavor, for active service in the foreign fields after the 
battle. 

3. We recognize the fact that through our home and state mis- 
sion boards we are able to plant the seed of the gospel in many fer- 
tile fields. 

4. We re-emphasize the command of the Great Commission, and 
seek to inspire our people with a missionary vision. 

5. That we pray unceasingly for our missionaries and give 
them the assurance that we will support them when the doors are 
open. 

Respectfully submitted, 

C. E. Ruffin. 
o 

Mrs. Charles B. Howard, of Buies Creek presented the W. 
M. U. report. 

W. M. U. REPORT 

There is nothing spectacular to mark whatever success has been 
achieved in our W. M. U. work for 1943, but a steady striving toward 
ideals and objectives for which we are organized. 

We are grateful for the faithful and consecrated efforts of the 
leaders and members of all our societies, who have helped to make 
possible this report and to God who has richly blessed and given 
the increase. 

We have a W. M. S. in 16 of the 26 churches in our association. 
All except one of these 16 sponsor at least one organization for 
young people. There is a total of 59 young people's organizations. 
Eight of these have been organized this year. We need to make the 
work of our young people indeed a major objective. 

Of our 7 full graded unions we still have only one attaining the 
A-1 standard. Dunn reached this goal. Five other units were A-1. 
The W. M. S. at Chalybeate Springs, the Intermediate G. A. at An- 
gler, the G. A. at Antioch, and the Junior and Intermediate G. A. at 
Lillington. Last year we reported eleven A-1 units. 

We have continued to emphasize Mission Study, but we show a 
decrease in number of classes held. Last year we reported 76; this 
year we report 57. We have had one associational course. 

We feel happy and grateful to speak of our stewardship of ma- 
terial things. Our 1943 goal to the 100,000 club was $1200. In the 
first three quarters we gave this cause 1297.47. Our Cooperative 
Program goal for 1943 is $3,620.78. In three quarters we have given 
$2,689.01. Our total gifts for three quarters, including all regular 
ones and additional $54 to the Baptist Hospital for linens, and $157 
to Angel Aguillera, Cuban ministerial student at Campbell College, 

19 



Minutes of the Little River Baptist Association 

amount to $4,730.06. This year we report 212 tithers. Last year 
there were 127. 

Subscriptions to Biblical Recorder and our mission magazines 
have increased from 374 last year to 662 this year. 

Our two executive committee meetings and our annual meet-r 
ing in Coats have been well attended. 

In these days of anxiety and stress may each one of us be more 
alert and more devoted to our Master's cause, realizing that the 
paramount motive and hope for Christianity for the nations of the 
world are to be found in the words of our 1943 watchword, "that all 
the kingdoms of the world may know that Thou art the Lord, even 
Thou only." 

Respectfully submitted, 

Mrs. Chas. B. Howard, 
Associational W. M. U. Supt. 
o 

Rev. M. O. Alexander, representing our State Mission 
Board, spoke to us challengingly concerning the matter of mis- 
sions. He mentioned especially "Kingdom Building in N. C* 
by M. A. Huggins. 

Brother John Oats gave a stirring address on the subject 
of Temperance as related to beverage alcohol. Brother M. A. 
Journagan presented a motion to appoint a committee to pre- 
sent a resolution on temperance. The moderator appointed 
Chas. H. Howard, S. A. Rhyne, G. T. Mills, J. O. Weathers, and 
W. C. Stone. 

At four o'clock the following items in Christian Education 
were presented: 

REPORT ON AMERICAN BIBLE SOCIETY 

It is a source of gratification that our churches are beginning to 
rally to the support of the American Bible Society. Last year only 
one church in the association made a donation to this cause, but 
this year the report is much more encouraging. 

The following churches have contributed the amounts indicated: 
Angier, $5.00; Antioch, $15.00; Baptist Grove $26.16; Broadway, 
$2.00; Buie's Creek, $20.00; Chalybeate Springs, $27.05; Coats, 
$5.00; Cumberland Union, $4.00; Harmony, $5.21; Holly' Springs, 
$9.00; Kennebec, $1.00; Lillington, $5.00; Pleasant Memory, $3.00; 
Swann Station, $5.00, making a total of $123.42. 

It is sincerely hoped that during the next associational year ev- 
ery church in the association will make the American Bible Society 
a regular object of giving and either include it in the church budget 

19 



Minutes of the Little River Baptist Association 

or take a special offering sometime during the year for the cause. 
The Bible is the Book of Faith on which rests freedom. Soldier, 
sailor, prisoner of war, refugee — they need it, ask for it, but cann«t 
get it— will not get it unless American Christians help. Few things 
for humanity can American Christians do so easily and at such rela- 
tively small cost as to send forth an abundant supply of the Book, 
which must be the world's primary source of faith and freedom. 

Respectfully submitted, 
G. G. Page. 

o — _ _ . . , . "' 

REPORT ON CHRISTIAN LITERATURE 

In spite of the progress of education this is an age of much ig- 
norance in spiritual matters. The schools have taught much science 
and many other things concerning our material world, but there has 
been a dearth of instruction and education in the Bible and spiritu- 
al truths. As a result we have become careless and indifferent 
about these things. 

However, in the face of this indifference toward Christian lit- 
erature we can gladly report progress during the past year. 19 of 
our 26 churches now have a Recorder club, totaling 324 subscrip- 
tions. 

The W. M. U. has made unusual progress in promoting Chris- 
tion literature this year. They report: 

1942 1943 

No. Home Mission Magazines , 17 60 

Royal Service 137 222 

The Window ._- 10 17 

The Commission 23 v 80 

World Comrades 51 87 

Next year we should strive to have our Association 100 per cent 
in Recorder Clubs; more subscriptions to all the W. M. U. maga- 
zines and constant effort on the part of leaders to encourage the 
reading and use of these. The "Open Window," a quarterly booklet 
of daily devotions, is highly recommended as an aid in family wor- 
ship. Finally, all of our reading should be built around, and in a». 
effort to understand God's Word. 

^ Respectfully submitted, 
Truby Powell. 
o 

Report on Christian Education 

Baptists are what they are largely because they have believed 
in and supported missions, benevolences and Christian education. 
For instance, Wake Forest College was organized in 1834, only four 

20 



Minutes of the Little River Baptist Association 



years after the state Convention itself vr^as organized in 1830. As 
Baptists have grown, other institutions have followed: Chowan, 
Mars Hill, Meredith, Campbell, Wingate, Boiling Springs. Baptistfe 
have believed in the necessity for trained and consecrated leader- 
ship. We have no way to secure such leadership except through 
building and supporting Christian colleges. The need for such lead- 
crsnip was never greater than today. 

DANGERS 

Christian Education is confronted by a three-fold danger. 

First — Financial. The reduced student enrollment, due to war, 
means lower income. The general uncertainty of the financial future 
has caused a dropping off of scholarships. Added to this is the keen, 
competition with tax-supported schools. 

Second — Patronage. Far too few of our Baptist people have tak- 
en advantage of our Christian schools. Most of our Baptist schools 
are liberal arts colleges, designed to fit for worthy living, with the 
distinct purpose of instilling the Christian way of living in the 
thinking of the student as well as professionalor technical skill. 

Third — the trend toward technical education. The educational 
program set up for military students is largely of a technical nature. 
When the war is over, we will have the largest group of technically 
trained young people we have ever had. The danger lies in the fact 
that these and others, seeing the utilitarian value of such training, 
will turn from the liberal art* program which gives a broad under- 
standing to fit for worthy living. 

OPPORTUNITIES 

With each danger, however, there is an opportunity. 

For the financial problem, we need to secure funds now while 
money is plentiful, not only paying off indebtedness, but for build- 
ing and endowment after the war. 

In the field of patronage lies a great opportunity. Never before 
has the need for Christian Education been so evident. We shall 
lack, perhaps, an entire college generation with no liberal and no 
Christian education. The problems of peace will be far more de- 
manding of Christian understanding than those of any other period. 
This constitutes the real opportunity of Christian colleges to make 
ready for the large group that will turn toward college when the 
war is over. , 

The third opportunity lies in recalling the values of liberal arts 
taught from a Christian point of view. Technical education may en- 
able one to make money more easily for a while, but liberal educa- 
tion enables one to live more fully and more usefully. 

The Education Commission of our State Convention is making 
a study of our educational institutions with a view to helping them 
serve their day and generation and the purpose for which they exist, 

21 



Minutes of the Little River Baptist Association 

No Baptist church can possibly say that the welfare of these col- 
leges is no concern to it. In a world such as ours today, trained 
leadership is of vital necessity. Let parents and pastors try to in- 
terest, encourage and lead our young people to enter a Christian 
college — one of our own Baptist institutions. 

Respectfully submitted, 
Mrs. C. D. Bain. 

, o 

Following these reports there was an address on the subject 
of Christian Education by Brother T. H. King. 

A business session was conducted at the close of the after' 
noon session. This business session consisted of the following: 

REPORT OF RESOLUTIONS COMMITTEE 

Be it resolved: 

1. That the Moderator's wise and comprehensive report to the 
Association be reduced to writing and included in the minutes of 
the Little River Association. 

2. That the suggestions submitted by our Moderator be given 
careful and prayerful consideration by the Executive Committee of 
the Little River Association, in view of their adoption as a working 
basis for our Association. 

3. That we express to the Antioch Baptist Church and the pas^ 
tor, our deepest appreciation for the very cordial and generous hos- 
pitality shown us during this session of the Little River Associa- 
tion. 

Mark M. Jernigan 

Mrs. Joel G. Lay ton 

Mrs. Marvin Bethune, Committee. 



REPORT ON TIME^ PLACE AND PREACHER 

Time — Tuesday after the 4th Sunday in October, 1944, October 
24, 1944. 

Place — Holly Springs. 
Preacher — Rev. S. L. Morgan. 

Respectfully submitted, 
S. F. Hudson 
T. T. Lanier 
Harvey Austin 

—. .. Q : 



22 



Minutes of the Little River Baptist Association 



REPOR OF TEMPERANCE RESOLUTION COMMITTEE 

Whereas, from the impassioned plea of our honored Brother 
John A. Oates, and from other sources, we have taken cognizance of 
the aggravated evils of the liquor traffic in North Carolina, 
Therefore, be it resolved: 

First, that the Little River Association again go on record as be- 
ing unalterably opposed to the liquor business in all of its many 
iorms. 

Second, that we urge upon every Baptist in our membership to- 
tal abstinence from alcoholic beverages, and personal efforts to 
lead others to the same position. 

Third, that all of us purpose to uphold the cause of temperance 
hy our influence, our labors, our prayers, and our votes. 

Fourth, that it is the sense of this body that the North Carolina 
Legislature ought to give the people of the state, at this time, an op- 
portunity to vote on the question of the liquor business. 

Fifth, that we do now pledge our loyal and unqualified support 
to the Allied Church League in its militant program against liquor 
in North Carolina. 

Respectfully submitted, 
C. B. Howard 
W. C. Stone 
G. T. Mills 

J. O. Weathers \ 

S. A. Rhyne, 

Special Committee. 
o 

REPORT OF COMMITTEE ON MODERATOR'S MESSAGE 

1. That we accept the Moderator's recommendation to appoint 
a committee of 12 with vice -moderator as chairman, to act as a spe- 
cial Executive Committee. The heads of the various departments (S, 
S., B. T. U., W. M. S., etc.), shall be included by virtue of their of- 

iice. 

2. We recommend that the Association instruct the above com- 
mittee to canvass the churches, and as soon as they see reasonable 
prospect of having the salary to employ a full time general worker 
for the association. 

3. We strongly urge our churches to prayerfully consider and 
work toward the grouping of churches into fields, thus making for 
more efficient work in the kingdom. 

4. That a committee of three be appointed to study the consti- 
tution and make suggestions as to any changes desirable. S. L. Mor- 

23 



Minutes of the Little River Baptist Association 

gan, Jr., Owen Odum, and G. Scott Turner were appointed as this 
committee. 

5. That the churches regard the 30th of September as the close 
of the association year and make their reports on this basis. 

6. We urge the pastors to avail themselves of every opportuni- 
ty to work through the public schools. 

Respectfully submitted, 

G. Scott Turner, Chairman. 
o 

REPORT OF NOMINATING COMMITTEE 

The nominations for Associational Sunday School and Training 
Union officers is found in the directory in the front of the minutes* 
Note: The committee further recommends that the Western 
Group be subdivided, for the duration, into the Western and South- 
ern groups, the Western to comprise Swan Station, Broadway and 
Holly Springs Baptist Chapel, and Antioch; the Southern to com- 
prise Lillington, Harmony, Layton's Chapel, Bethel, and Friendship^ 
Respectfully submitted. 
Miss Zula Rogers 
Miss Mattie Bain 
C. B. Howard, 

Nominating Committee. 
o 

REPORT ON THE STATE OF THE CHURCHES 

This report consisted of a digest of some of the highlights 
of the associational church letters. It is contained in the Tables 
in the back of the minutes. This report was given by Rev. G. 
Scott Turner. 

At the request of the Clerk-Treasurer, Mrs. J. G. Layton 
made a motion that the First Citizens Bank of Angier be asked 
to act as auditor of the Association's funds. The motion carried. 

TJie afternoon session closed with the singing of "Blest Be 
The Tie That Binds" and prayer by Brother S. A. Ryan. 

The Antioch Church, continuing her hospitality, asked all 
who would to remain for supper. The many who did were gra- 
ciously received. 

EVENING SESSION 

Moderator Campbell called the session to order at 7:30 
P. M. We were led in song by Brother Henry Patterson. Our 

24 



Minutes of the Little River Baptist Association 

pianist was Mrs. G. C. Dixon. Rev. Marshall Walker conducted 
a brief period of worship. Misses Ethel Elliott, Margaret Ruth 
Harrell, Gwendolyn Fulcher, and Naomi Spencer sang "The 
Lord Is In His Holy Temple." These young ladies were stu- 
dents at Campbell College. 

Mrs. George Dixon gave a most interesting discussion of 
Church Music. 

Under the heading "Our Associational Program" the fol' 
lowing reports were presented: 

REPORT ON SUNDAY SCHOOLS 

The world's greatest teacher, Jesus Christ, placed teaching the 
gospel next to preaching the gospel. He said, "Go ye into all the 
world and teach the gospel to all nations . . . teaching them to ob- 
serve all things whatsoever I have commanded you." It is in obe- 
dience to His command that churches maintain the Sunday School. 
The S. S. is a channel through which Christians commit to faithful 
men the things which they have heard of Him whom to know aright 
is life eternal. 

This year has been one of unusual characteristics in our Asso- 
ciational Sunday School work. Each person who has been named 
as general superintendent has declined. Miss Ruby Williams con- 
sented to serve from February until April and led us through the 
associational conference, sponsored by our Southern Baptist Con- 
vention on April 1. Since that time very little has been done ex- 
cept through the department superintendents. 

In spite of the shortage of gas and tires and other handicaps, you 
have been patient and unusually cooperative in the Vacation Bible 
School work. Although the Holly Springs, Kennebec, and Piney 
Grove churches did not have a school, you reached out and conduct- 
-ed two mission schools, which gives us only one less than we had 
last year. The enrolhnent and attendance were better than last 
year. 

We recommend: 

1. That more study courses be taught. 

2. That our schools be equipped for better teaching. 

3. That more people be enlisted to work in our schools. Too 
naany are attending without a special task to perform. 

4. That at least two associational- wide Sunday School meet- 
ings be held during the year. 

5. That all Sunday School superintendents request the secretary 
to send a monthly report of his school to the Associational S. S. 



25 



Minutes of the Little River Baptist Association 

Superintendent on Monday following the last Sunday in each, 
month. 

6. That each church make definite plans for a Bible school to 
be held in May or June. Plans to be made by April 1. 
Respectfully submitted, 
Zula Rogers. 



BAPTIST TRAINING UNION REPORT 

(Prepared by Truhy Powell, Presented by Sam Hudson) 

J. D. Grey, a Baptist pastor, says: "What Randolph Field is in. 
the air corps, what Annapolis is to the navy, and what West Point is 
to the army, the Training Union is to a Baptist church." A deep 
realization of this fact on the part of most of our people is not mani- 
fested by our report, which leads us to say that we need to rethink 
the values of Training Union work. 

At present we have 26 Baptist churches in our Association; 14 
of these churches at one time during the year had some form of 
Training Union work. During the year 5 of these organizations dis- 
banded, leaving 9 churches with Training Union work. We have six 
churches with adult unions; 12 senior unions; 9 intermediates; 8 
junior and 7 story hour. Antioch, with a full-graded Training Union, 
is to be commended for the splendid work done during the year. 

We had five churches from our Association represented at our 
regional meeting in Raleigh. Our association won 1st place in the 
Better Speakers Contest, Junior Memory Work, and the Song Festi- 
val, and 2nd place in the Bible Reader's Tournament. 

Our representation at Ridgecrest for N. C. Training Union week 
numbered around 40. Miss Billie Pope, Dunn, won 2nd place in the 
Better Speakers Contest there; also Emily Frances Altman, Jimmy^ 
Coats, Betty Susan Draughn, Dunn, won in the memory work. 

I submit the following recommendations for the new year: 

1. Strive to reorganize Training Union work in the five church- 
es that have disbanded, and set up new organizations where possible. 

2. Conduct one wide-awake Study Course in all the churches 
with Training Unions, preferably in March. 

3. Encourage a more wholehearted participation in all the 
contests. 

4. Two association- wide meetings and two group meetings dur- 
ing the year. 



REPORT ON EVANGELISM 
LITTLE RIVER ASSOCIATION— OCTOBER 26, 1943 
We have about 7,000 Baptists in our Association. During the 
year just closed we baptized 320 into the membership of our 26 

26 



Minutes of the Little River Baptist Association 

churches, an average of 12 for each church. The 537,680 Baptists in 
North Carolina baptized last year 19,542 into 2609 churches, an av- 
erage of 7 for each church. The 5,367,129 Baptists in the South bap- 
tized 209,127 into 25,737 churches, an average of 8 for each church. 
The average church in our association has 263 members, the average 
in the state has 206 members, the average in the South has 209 
members. In our association it took 22 of us last year to win one 
person to Christ, in the state 27, in the South 26. In 1942 Little 
River Baptists baptized one for every 26 members, in 1941, one for 
every 28 members, in 1943, one for every 22 members. 

We report for the year now closing, revivals in 24 of our 
churches with 22 churches having one or more baptisms. Buie's 
Creek reports the largest number of Baptisms with 75. Erwin comes 
next with 39; Antioch third with 30. 

We still have 12 churches reporting no W. M. U. work, and 16 
reporting no B. T. U. work. In 1941 we had 10 churches with quarter 
time preaching, ten with half-time preaching, and 6 full-time. In 
1942 we had 7 churches with quarter-time, 11 with half-time, and 
8 with full-time. This year we have 3 with quarter-time, 16 half- 
time, and 7 with full-time preaching. In 1941 we had 76 sermons 
per month. In 1942 we had 84. This year we have 89. 

Evangelistic services have been held every Sunday in the coun- 
ty jail, twice a month in the County Home, and once a month in 
the County prison camp. Thousands of tracts, Bible portions, etc., 
have been distributed, and dozens of conversions reported. 

There are more than 12,000 unsaved persons in our territory,, 
about two for each one of us. Let each person win one next yeart 

Respectfully submitted, 

Chas. B. Howard. 



Rev. Chas. B. Howard conducted the memorial service, af- 
ter which Rev. C. E. Ruffin led our prayer. 

Rev. Forrest Maxwell of Erwin, pastor of the First Baptist 
Church there, was recognized as a new worker in our ranks. 

Dr. C. D. Bain, of Dunn, was elected our delegate to the 
State Convention and our representative where we are called 
upon to name an associational representative on any state 
board or committee. 

After prayer by Rev. Forrest Maxwell the association ad- 
journed in perfect peace. 

27 



Minutes of the Little River Baptist Association 



Our Dead 



ANGIER— 

Mrs. Ada Day- 
Mrs. S. M. Wheless 

Mr. W. M. Morris 
ANTIOCH— 

Mr. Evander Brown 

Mrs. Ellen E. Rogers 

Miss Bessie Nordan 
BAPTIST GROVE— 

Mrs. Mammie Sexton 

Mr. R. I. Jones 
BETHEL— 

Mrs. G. A. Matthews 

Mrs. Effie McCorquadale 
BUIES CREEK— 

Mrs. Lillian Bell 

Pvt, Edward Lorraine Coats 

Lt. Elbert Parker 
CHALYBEATE SPRINGS— 

Mr. Charlie Buchanan 
COATS— 

Mrs. Flora A. Keene 
CUMBERLAND UNION— 

Mrs. Nancy Stewart 
DUNN— 

Deacon J. L. Brock 

Mrs. W. M. Burns 



Dalton West 

Mr. R. Durham Taylor 

Mr. George T. Noel 

Mr. John C. Hodges 

Mrs. Lou Williams 
ERWIN— 

Mrs. G. Woodworth, Sr. 
FRIENDSHIP— 

Mrs. C. L. Parker 
HARMONY— 

Mr. R. A. Bell 

Mr. J. P. Cercy 
HOLLY SPRINGS— 

Mrs. Florence Patterson 

Mrs. Sophie Buchanan 

Mrs. E. B. Collins 
LAYTON'S CHAPEL— 

Mrs. Sarah C. Holder 
LILLINGTON— 

Dr. J. W. Halford 

Mr. M. B. McKinney 

Lt. Ernest Simmons 
MACEDONIA— 

Mr. N. T. Wilkins 
SWAN STATION— 

Cpl. James Watson Graham 

Mrs. J. B. Godfrey 



28 



Minutes of the Little River Baptist Association 

ANNUAL MEETING 

of the 

WOMAN'S MISSIONARY UNION 

UTTLE RIVER ASSOCIATION 

COATS BAPTIST CHURCH , 

September 7, 1943 

The meeting was called to order by the Superintendent^ 
Mrs. Charles B. Howard. . 

Hymn — "All Hail the Power of Jesus' Name." .; 

Theme — "Christ Pre-eminent." 

Devotional — Col. 1:18, led by Mrs. S. L. Morgan, Jr., of 
Dunn. 

The printed program was adopted as the order of the day. 

Appointment of Committees follows: 

I. Committee on Resolutions — Mrs. R. L. Young, Mrs. J. 
R. Butler, Mrs. N. W. Maness. 

Time and Place — Mrs. Wilton Byrd, Mrs. Jane Surles, Mrs. 
D. J. Thomas. 

A brief report was made by the president from each W. M. 
S. All churches were present except two. 

Mission Study — Mrs. J. A. McLeod made this report in the 
absence of Mrs. Durham Taylor. Total number of classes held, 
57. Number of books studied, 32, with 955 people attending. 

II. Stewardship — Miss Lillian Draughon reported that 
gifts were fifty per cent above the past year for the hundred 
thousand club. 

III. Community Missions — Mrs. J. L. Atkinson made a very 
impressive report and showed how important Community Mis- 
sions is and what it means to each local church. 

IV. Margaret Fund— Miss Mattie Bain pointed out the 
need to continue our gifts to this cause. Mrs. John Tumblin of 
Brazil, a returned missionary, expressed her appreciation of 
what the fund had meant to her family. 

V. Training School — Mrs. C. K. Smith gave a very inter- 
esting report. She urged that the young ladies be led to take 

29 



Minutes of the Little River Baptist Association 

advantage of the opportunity of going to the Training School. 

VI. White Cross — Mrs. Robert Young reported that a tO' 
tal of $53.15 had been given to this cause. 

VII. Mrs. J. G. Layton reported that a large increase in 
subscribers to all denominational magazines and papers has 
been made this year. 

President's Report — Mrs. Charles B. Howard made a for- 
mal report of the work for the year. A motion was made to 
adopt it as read. 

Special Music — Mrs. Harry Wood sang "The Holy City.." 

Miss Kathryn Abee, State Young People's Secretary, held 
open Conference. 

Address — Christ Exalted In All the Kingdoms of the Earth. 

One of the Southern Baptist Missionaries to China returned 
€n the Gripsholm. 

After announcements were made, the morning session was 
closed with prayer by Mrs. J. L. Atkinson. 

Adjournment for lunch. 

AFTERNOON SESSION 

The afternoon session was opened by singing "O For a 
Thousand Tongues To Sing." Prayer was led by Mrs. I. K. 
Stafford. Mrs. Harry Wood made a strong appeal for Mere- 
dith College. 

Miss Kathryn Abee conducted an open conference. 

Scripture and Prayer — Mr. Angel Aguilera (Cuba). He 
Tead a part of the 107th Psalm, followed with prayer. He ex- 
pressed his gratitude for the financial help received from the 
W. M. U. 

Mrs. D. B. Andrews made the young people's report, in the 
absence of Miss Ophelia Matthews. The report was adopted. 

Three Sunbeams from the Lillington church gave some 
memory verses. 

G. A. — A group of girls from Buie's Creek gave the Alle- 
giance and sang the G. A. song. Three G. A.'s from Chalybeate 
Springs displayed the work they had done in attaining Forward 
Steps. 

Miss Zula Rogers spoke in place of Miss Mary Lee Page— • 
Y. W. A. of Antioch. 

30 



Minutes of the Little River Baptist Association 

The R. A.'s were represented by Mrs. S. L. Morgan in the 
absence of Mr. Morgan. The imaginative story which she gave 
was very interesting. 

Memorial Service was conducted by Mrs. Owen Odum in 
the absence of Mrs. Hugh Johnson. 

Time and Place — The time of meeting was changed to Tues- 
day after the first Sunday in April. Place — Friendship. 

Resolutions — The Committee expressed appreciation for the 
splendid hospitality and fellowship and the program for the 
day. 

The meeting came to a close with prayer by Mrs. D. F. 
Stamps. 



31 



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Minutes Gf The 

I . 

I Little River 

I Baptist 

I Association % 

J North Carolina | 

I 69th Annual Session ^ 

^ held with % 

I Holly Springs Baptist Church % 

I October Twenty-Fourth % 

\ 1944 I 

I The next annual session will be held Tuesday, October %^ 

\ 30th, 1946, at Chalybeate Springs Baptist Church ^ 



.A-^ 



f^-^ 



Little River 

Baptist 
Association 

North Carolina 

69th Annual Session 



held with 



Holly Springs Baptist Church 
October 24, 1944 



The next annual session will be held Tuesday, October 
30th, 1945, at Chalybeate Springs Baptist Church 




Dedication To Rev. G. T. Mills, 1878-1944 

Rev. G. T. Mills was born Dec. 2, 1878, and died Oct. 11th, 1944. 
He was born and reared in the Olive Chapel community in Wake 
County, son of Rev. Greene Mills and Evelyn Broadwell Mills. He 
received his early education at the Green Level School. He entered 
Buie's Creek Academy (now Campbell College) in 1897, graduating 
in 1904. Following his graduation, he taught school at the college 
for one year. He next entered Wake Forest College and graduated 
in 1916 with his A, B. degree. 

He became an ordained minister at the age of 1-3 years, and 
held a number of pastorates in Wake, Durham and Harnett Coun- 
ties. At the time of his death he was pastor of Green Level and Mt. 
Zion Baptist Churches in Wake County, and Cumberland Union and 
Baptist Grove churches in Harnett County. 

He had been pastor of the Green Level Church for 24 years. 

He was a member of the Green Level Masonic Lodge No. 277. 

He was twice married, first to Miss Callie Williams of Buie's 
Creek, who died January 21, 1919. Surviving this union are four 
daughters and two sons. 

He was next married to Miss Electa Farrar of Apex, who now 
survives, as do one daughter and one son. Twelve grandchildren 
and three sisters also survive. 

As pastor, he preached his first sermon and his last one at Cum- 
berland Union Church. He had just closed the revival on Sunday, 
October 8th, 1944. 



Minutes or the Little River Baptist Association 



Associational Directory 

Moderator: Dr. L. H. Campbell Buie's Creek 

Vice-Moderator: Rev. Sam Hudson Lillington 

Clerk-Treasurer: Rev. H. D. Wood, Jr. Angier 

Mission Worker: Miss Zula Rogers __ Lillington 

Special Officers 

Christian Literature Chairman __- Mrs. J. G. Layton, Lillington 

Orphanage Representative C. D. Bain, Dunn 

Mission Chairman C. E. Ruffin, Broadway 

Temperance Chairman W. M. Thomas, Broadway 

Hospital Representative H. E. Baker, Coats 

Ministers' Annuity Chairman __ L. J. Atkinson, Lillington, Rt. 3 
Christian Education Chairman ____ R. L. Whipple, Buie's Creek 

ORDAINED MINISTERS WHO ARE PASTORS 

Atkins, R. E. 27 Dixie Trail, Raleigh, N. C, 

Atkinson, L. J Lillington, N. C, Rt. 3 

Baker, H. M. Coats, N. C. 

Blackman, J. F. Buie's Creek, N. C. 

Edge, Norman B. Dunn, N. C, Box 453 

Franklin, J. F. Winston-Salem, N. C. 

Graham, George Goldston, N. C. 

Holloway, Julius Lillington, N. C. 

Howard, Charles B Buie's Creek, N. C. 

Hudson, Sam Lillington, N. C. 

Hux, Martin Luther Fuquay Springs, N. C. 

Jones, Horace Dunn, N. C. (Ordained this year) 

Keller, E. C Dunn, N. C, Rt. 1 

Maxwell, Forest Erwin, 1^. C 

Morgan, S. Lewis — Dunn, N. C. 

Mills, G. Titus Apex (Died October 11, 1944) 

Phipps, Aaron Buie's Creek, IST. C. 

Pulley, Odell Buie's Creek, N. C. 

Ruffin, C. E Broadway, N. C, 

,7 



Minutes of the Little River Baptist Association 

Stafford, I. K. Buie's Creek, N. C. 

Turner, G. Scott - Chalybeate Springs, N. C. 

Vaden, Charles — Buie's Creek, N. C. 

Wood, Harry D., Jr. Angier, N. C. 

ORDAINED MINISTERS WHO ARE NOT PASTORS 

Ayscue, J. E. Buie's Creek, N. C. 

Campbell, W. T Fuquay Springs, N. C. 

Hall, R. F Lillington, N. C. 

Harris, J. F. Manchester, N. C, Star Route 

Mann, Lester Durham, N. C. 

Painter, C. W. Manchester, N. C, Star Route 

Whipple, R. L. Buie's Creek, N. C. 

MINISTERS ORDAINED THIS YEAR 

Jones, Horace Buie's Creek, N. C. 

Poole, William A. Burgaw, N. C. 

Weaver, J. M. Wheaton College 

ASSOCIATIONAL SUNDAY SCHOOL OFFICERS 

Superintendent G. G. Paige, Buie's Creek 

Supt. of Evangelism G. Scott Turner, Chalybeate Springs 

Western Group Leader Leary Knight, Broadway, N. C. 

Southern Group Leader Mrs. Sam Hudson, Lillington 

Eastern Group Leader C. D. Bain, Dunn, N. C. 

Central Group Leader Berless Johnson, Lillington, N. C. 

Cradle Roll Supt. Mrs. C. L. Guy, Dunn, N. C. 

Beginner Supt. Mrs. H. H. Hamilton, Lillington 

Primary Supt. Miss Mamie Haigwood, Lillington 

Junior Supt. Mrs. I, K. Stafford, Buie's Creek 

Intermediate Mrs. R. A. Duncan, Dunn, N. C. 

Young People's Dept. Mrs. E. C. Keller, Dunn, N. C. 

Supt. Adult Dept. G. T. Proffitt, Buie's, N. C. 

Supt. Extension Dept. __ Mrs. Leslie Turlington, Buie's Creek 

Supt. of Training L. J. Atkinson, Lillington, N. C. 

Secretary Miss Myrtice McPhail, Buies Creek, N. C. 

t 



Minutes of the Little River Baptist Association 

ASSOCIATIONAL B. T. U. OFFICERS 

Director Rev. Sam Hudson, Lillington, N. C» 

Associate Director Mr. Leek Coats, Dunn, N. C. 

Secretary-Treasurer Mrs. Letha Powell, Lillington, N. C. 

Pastor Advisor Forest Maxwell, Dunn, N. C. 

Pianist Mrs. Frances Johnson, Lillington, N. C. 

Chorister Horace Jones, Buie's Creek, N. C. 

Adult Leader Miss Lillian Draughon, Dunn, N. C. 

Young People's Leader__ Miss Mary Lee Page, Lillington, N. C. 

Intermediate Leader Miss Patricia Horton, Erwin, Rt. 1 

Junior Leader Miss Bessie McNeill, Broadway, N. C. 

Story Hour Leader Miss Addie Prevatt, Buie's, N. C 

Eastern Group Leader Mrs. Berless Johnson, Lillington N. C. 

Northern Group Leader Erwin Stevens, Kipling, N. C. 

Western Group Leader Mss Erma Knight, Broadway, N. C. 

Southern Group Leader ____ Herbert Hood, Bunnlevel, N. C. 

SONG LEADERS OR CHOIR DIRECTORS 

Angier __ Mrs. Harry D. Wood, Jr., Angier, N. C. 

Antioch H. G. Patterson, Mamers, N. C. 

Baptist Grove __ D. G. Sexton, Fuquay Springs, N. C. 

Bethel Leland Matthews, Linden, Rt. 1 

Broadway H. A. Thomas, Broadway, N. C. 

Buie's Creek __ Mrs. A. E. Lynch, Buie's Creek, N. C. 

Chalybeate Springs T. L. Caviness, Fuquay Springs, N. C. 

Coats __ Mrs. F. H. Flemming, Coats, N. . 

Cumberland Union J. O. Weathers, Fuquay Springs, N. C. 

Dunn, First __ __ Mrs. Charles C. Upchurch, Dunn, N. C. 

Dunn, Second B. A. Slaughter, Dunn, Rt. 1 

East Erwin Mr. George Houston, Erwin, N. C. 

Erwin, First __ Mrs. D. C. Woodall and Mrs. C. L. Byrd Erwin 

Friendship W. L. Byrd, Bunnlevel, N. C, 

Harmony H. S. Hedgepeth, Bunnlevel, N. C. 

Holly Springs Leary Knight, Broadway, N. C. 

Kennebec N. T. McLean, Willow Springs, N. C. 

Macedonia Leo Weathers, Holly Springs, N. C. 

Neil's Creek, N. C Lloyd Johnson, Lillington, N. C. 

Rawls Henry Rawls, Fuquay Springs, N. .C. 



Minutes of the, Little River Baptist Association 

Swanns H. W. Graham, Jonesboro, N. . Rt. 1 

(Sunday School Supts., Training Union Directors, W. M. S. 
Presidents, Clerks and Treasurers will be found in the Statistical 

Tables.) 



Constitution 



1. This association shall be known as 'The Little River Bap- 
tist Association." 

2. The object of this association shall be the advancement 
of the kingdom of Christ, and the means of accomplishing this 
shall be strict conformity with the principles of the New Testa- 

• ment, 

3. The association shall have no authority over the inter- 
nal rights of any church belonging to it and shall act only as an 
advisory council. 

4. The association shall be composed of messengers chosen 
by the churches connected with it, each church being entitled to 
five delegates. Ordained ministers having oversight of churches 
in the association, or having their membership in these churches, 
shall also be received as messengers. 

5. A quorum shall consist of messengers from a majority of 
the churches of the association. 

6. The delegates from each church to the annual meeting of 
the association shall bear a lettter certifying their appointment 
and giving an account of the condition of the church and a state- 
ment of all funds contributed for local and benevolent purposes. 

7. The officers of the association shall be a moderator, a 
vice-moderator, a clerk and a treasurer, who shall be chosen an- 
nually from the members composing the association, and shall 
continue in office until their successors are elected. The term of 
office of the moderator shall begin at the conclusion of the ses- 
sion at which he is elected and continue until the close of the 
next annual meeting. 

8. It shall be the duty of the moderator to preside during the 
deliberations of the body, to enforce the observance of the consti- 
tution, preserve the decorum, appoint committees except when 
other provisions are made for their appointment, decide all ques- 
tions of order, giving his opinion on any question under discus- 
sion, and cast the deciding vote in case of a tie. 

9. It shall be the duty of the clerk to record the proceedings 

10 



Minutes of the Little River Baptist Association 

of each annual meeting of the association, superintend the print- 
ing of the minutes and their distribution among the churches. 

10. It shall be the duty of the treasurer to receive all funds 
sent by the churches or collected during the sessions of this body 
and to disburse the same for the objects stated. He shall present a 
report on all funds administered by him at each annual meeting. 

11. The association shall appoint, annually, a Promotion 
Committee composed of one member from each church in the as- 
sociation and the pastors of the churches. The moderator shall be 
chairman of this committee. The function of this committee shall 
be the promotion of Associational plans through the severai 
churches. 

12. The association shall appoint annually an Executive 
Committee of 12 members, among v^hom by virtue of their office 
are be the moderator, vice-moderator, clerk-treasurer, S. S. Supt. 
of the Association, Training Union Director, W. M. U. Superintend- 
ent, Supt. of Evangelism, the Associational Missionary. This com- 
mittee shall have general supervision of the affairs of the associa- 
tion during the interval between the meetings of the body; sha31 
seek to promote the w^elfare of the churches, and their active par- 
ticipation in the causes fostered by the denomination; but shall be 
answerable to the association for its acts, and make an annual re- 
port to the association of its work . 

13. The association in annual meeting shall appoint a pres- 
bytery of four members to sit with the pastor of any person whose 
ordination, is sought, and the moderator of the association, to ex- 
amine the qualifications and opportunities for work of the candi- 
date. 

14. The association shall hold an annual meeting commenc- 
ing on Tuesday after the fourth Sunday in October. 

15. A meeting of the association may be called by the modera- 
tor at any time by the consent of five members of the Executive 
Committee. Each church shall be notified of such a meeting m 
time to send delegates. 

16. This association shall have the right to exclude from its 
membership any church that departs from New Testament prin- 
ciples. 

17. Any church desiring to become a member of this asso- 
ciation may present a petition at the annual meeting of the body 
through delegates appointed for this purpose. If the association 
shall consent to receive such church the moderator shall extend 
the hand of fellowship to the delegates. 

18. The association may invite visitors to seats and extend 
to them all the privileges of delegates except that of voting. 

19. By appointment, at each annual meeting, an introduc- 

11 



Minutes of the Little River Baptist Association 

tory sermon, and a sermon or address on missions shall be deliv- 
ered. 

20. This constitution may be amended at any annual ses- 
sion, by a vote of two-thirds of the delegates present, provided 
that notice shall be given before the day that such motion will be 
presented. 



12 



Minutes of the Little River Baptist Association 

Proceeding's 

LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION OCT. 24, 1944 

The Little River Baptist Association meeting in its 69th 
session at Holly Springs Baptist Church Oct. 24, 1944, was 
called to order by Dr. L. H. Campbell, Moderator. The Hymn 
"To the Work" was sung after which Rev. H. D. Wood led in 
the reading of the Scriptures and prayer. 

The program was presented by Dr. Campbell, the motion 
that the suggested program be adopted was made by Rev. Sam 
Hudson. Motion passed. 

The clerk called the roll of churches and found 20 rep- 
resented. 

Rev. Sam Hudson moved that all those present from the 
churches and those who might come later be the members of 
this association. Motion passed. 

The following visitors were recognized. J. M. Page, Ral- 
eigh; L G. Greer, Thomasville; W. M. Page, Fuquay Springs; 
A. C. McCall; E. F. McNeill, Kansas. 

The Moderator made a few remarks relative to the ur- 
gency and importance of our business today. 

For the election of the Moderator for this year. Rev. Sam 
Hudson, Vice-Moderator, was called to the chair. Before tak- 
ing the chair, Brother Hudson nominated Dr. Campbell to 
serve another year. Dr. Campbell nominated Rev. Sam Hudson. 
Since there were no other nominations, the Clerk took the 
chair for the vote. Dr. L. H. Campbell was elected unanimously 
to serve as Moderator for the coming year. 

Rev. Sam Hudson was nominated and elected to serve as 
Vice-Moderator. Rev. H. D. Wood, Jr., was nominated and 
elected to serve as Clerk-Treasurer. 

The Executive Comimttee report was made by Rev. Sam 
Hudson. It was accepted as a report for action at the business 
session. (See the opening of the afternoon session for further 
details). 

On the motion of the Executive Committee as amended by 
,13 



Minutes of the Little River Baptist Association 



the amendment of Rev. S. L. Morgan the association voted "That 
any of our denominational schools be allowed time to present 
its expansion program but that time for the consideration of the 
unification of Wake Forest and Meredith be limited to five min- 
utes if anyone cares to speak." 

The Treasurer's report was presented and accepted as read. 

TREASURER'S REPORT 
To the Little River Baptist Association 

as required by the constitution, paragraph 10. October 24, 1944 

This report includes all funds received during and subsequent 
to the Association meeting in 1943 until October 19, 1944. 



Church Total Amt. of 

Angier $ 216.00 

Antioch 270.00 

Baptist Chapel 2.50 

Baptist Grove 10.00 

Bethel 35.00 

Broadway 5,00 

Buie's Creek 170.00 

Chalybeate Springs .- 124.00 

Coats 5.00 

Cumberland Union 43.00 

Dunn, First 330.62 

Erwin, East 22.00 

Erwin, First 110.00 

Friendship 45.00 

Harmony 8.00 

Holly Springs 63.75 

Kennebec 30.67 

Layton's Chapel 18.00 

Lillington : 207.50 

Macedonia 37.00 

Neils Creek 90.00 

Oak Grove 33.00 

Piney Grove - 

Pleasant Memory 14.00 

Rawls 2.00 

Swanns Station 22.00 



From Owen Odum 
Undesignated 



$1914.54 

190.07 

5.90 



Paid Miss Rogers' 

Salary $1000.0a 

Paid office painting, 
labor, travel, phone, 
postage, etc 199.50 

To Associational mis- 
sion program 1199.50 

To Minutes, etc 331.43 



Balance in Associa- 
tional mission funds $ 341.50 

Balance in general 

fund 238.08 



$ 579.58 

Total Disbursements.... $1530.93 
Balance on deposit 579.58 



$2110.51 



Grand Total Receipts.. $2110.51 



14 



Minutes of the Little River Baptist Association 

A statement by C, G. Fields, Cashier of the First-Citizeiis 
Bank and Trust Company of Angier, N. C, is on the clerk's desk 
concerning this account. 

A complete and detailed account of all expenditures is also on 
the clerk's desk for inspection. 

If you have any questions or corrections do not hesitate to 
make them known at once. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Harry D. Wood, Jr., Treasurer 

Little River Baptist Association 



Little River Baptist Ass'n 
Dr. L. H. Campbell Moderator 
Gentlemen: 

Re: Association records kept by Rev. Harry D. Wood, Angier, 
N. C. 

I have had the pleasure to compare Rev. Harry D. Wood's 
records with the bank records and find that he has kept an ex- 
cellent record. Rev. Wood's records of deposits and receipts are in 
good order and his record of disbursement are excellent. We also 
find that these records and balance agrees with ours with the ex- 
ception of one check in the amount of $50.00 and this particular 
check has not been presented to us for payment. 

It is indeed a pleasure to state to your association that we 
have had the pleasure of reviewing and comparing Rev. Wood'j 
association records with ours. 

With best wishes, I am, 

Sincerely yours, 

C. G. Fields, Cashier 


The report of our orphanage was presented by Dr. C. D. 
Bain and accepted as read. 

REPORT ON ORPHANAGE 2 

Times Sent 

Churches 1943-44 1941-42 1942-43 1943-44 

Angier 9 $ 84.50 $ 201.06 $ 297.74 

Antioch 1 104.40 136.00 172.00 

Baptist Chapel 1 10.75 25.65 18.00 

Baptist Grove 10 54.46 28.17 118.00 

Bethel 1 7.00 13.49 9.00 

Broadway 1 45.40 61.50 100.00 

15 



Minutes of the Little River Baptist Association 

Buie's Creek 12 195.00 728.00 2,278.00 

Chalybeate Springs - 11 157.59 231.23 260.94 

Coats 2 67.71 5.91 66.56 

Cumberland Union 1.25 

Dunn, First 11 731.42 698.61 897.28 

Erwin, First 2 85.00 105.00 139.00 

Erwin, East 12 -85.08 111.75 134.80 

Friendship 2 41.32 106.08 92.96 

Harmony 3 55.60 50.56 79.10 

Holly Springs 13 122.84 202.64 216.20 

Kennebec 1 19.70 26.26 26.10 

Layton's Chapel 1 10.00 31.40 11.75 

Lillington 8 115.50 204.78 90.00 

Macedonia 4 28.50 50.32 67.91 

Neill's Creek 5 46.67 69.11 77.13 

Oak Grove 2 2.37 11.22 27.00 

Piney Grove 12 91.20 120.07 97.66 

Pleasant Memory »2 1.64 17.04 10.00 

Rawls 1 35.00 45.00 50.00 

Swann Station 1 20.74 32.93 71.40 

Totals $2,219.29 $3,350.83 $3,409.43 

Although our Baptist people are providing well for the physi- 
cal, mental and spiritual needs of the children already admitted, 
we should enlarge our facilities to meet the needs ahead, not only 
of many already waititng but also to minister tomorrow to the 
alarming number of children being born out of wedlock and to 
many whose fathers are dying on battlefields. We would like to 
•see a third unit our Mills Home established, perhaps in the western 
part of our state. Reserve funds today, provide for tomorrow's 
needs. 

Again we urge all our churches: 

1. To make a worthy offering at Thanksgiving to our Or- 
phanage, on the basis of one day's income per member; 

2. To make and to send regularly once-a-month offerings to 
the Orphanage; 

3. To supply our membership with inspiring information 
about our Orphanage work through clubs to Charity and Childre7i. 

We call upon the pastor and Sunday School superintendent to 
lead our churches in a program of worthy and enlarged giving 
for our needy children. 

Respectfully submitted, 

C. D. Bain, Asso. Orphanage Rep. 



16 



Minutes of the, Little River Baptist Association 

^r. I. G. Greer was recognized. He spoke concerning the 
needs and opportunities of the orphanage. 

Rev. E. L. Spivey, of Charlotte, presented the work of the 
Cooperative Program. 

Rev. H. M. Baker presented the work of the hospital. This 
report was accepted as read. 

BAPTIST HOSPITAL REPORT 3 

North Carolina Baptists may vv^ell take pride in the way they 
are serving the State through the kindly ministry of the Baptist 
Hospital. The yearly grow^th of the scope of the services rendered 
by our hospital should be gratifying to every Baptist in North 
Carolina. 

The working partnership between the Hospital and the Bow- 
man Gray School of Medicine of Wake Forest College presents 
lIsTorth Carolina Baptists with unique opportunities for greater and 
far-reaching medical services. The name and fame of this partner- 
ship is spreading from year to year and it is widely known that the 
medical center provided by North Carolina Baptists in Winston- 
Salem is among the best in the South. 

The outstanding fact to be reported this year concerns the 
Mother's Day offering. The immediate goal in this offering wa^3 
75,000 dollars for use in building a new nurses home, but we hoped 
that the offering would exceed that amount and that the excess 
would be used to pay the debt still owed by the hospital. The 
75,000 dollar mark was well surpassed and work is now in prog- 
ress on the nurses' home which we hope will be completely by the 
end of the year. The hospital has received approximately 20,- 
000 dollars above the immediate goal of 75,000 dollars and this 
money is being applied on the existing debt. 

The Hospital reported recently the receipt of a gift to be used 
for the out-patient department. 

Let us look forward eagerly each year to having a share in 
the further development of our Hospital and its services, for we 
have in this enterprise some of the most promising work ever un- 
dertaken by North Carolina Baptists. 

Respectfully submitted 
H. M. Baker 



Bro. G. G. Page presented the work of the American Bible 
Society. The report was adopted as read. 

17 



Minutes of the Little River Baptist Association 

^ AMERICAN BIBLE SOCIETY 4 

The importance of the cause of the American Bible Society 
is growing upon our churches. Two years ago one church re- 
ported ten dollars to this cause. One year ago fourteen churches 
reported one hundred twenty three dollars and forty- two cents. 
Our report this year shows fifteen churches contributing a total 
of $227.92 as follows: Broadway $2, Buie's Creek $77.17, Chalybe- 
ate Springs $30, Coats $10, Cumberland Union $4.45, First Dunn 
$25, Erwin $5, Friendship $8.95, Harmony $10, Holly Springs 
$29.35, Kennebec $1, Lillington $20, Swann's Station $5. 

At least one church which has not contributed to this cause 
previously has included the American Bible Society in its bud- 
get for the ensuing year. Let us urge all our churches to provide 
for this worthy cause. 

Respectfully submitted, 
G. G. Page 
o — 

The following committees were appointed by the Modera- 
tor; Time, Place, Preacher: S. L. Morgan, C. W. Flowers, H. D. 
Wood. Organizations: Miss Zula Rogers, Sam Hudson, Miss Bes- 
sie McNeill. Resolutions: L. E. Atkinson, Mrs. Berles Johnson, 
Charles Vaden. 

Rev. E. C. Keller was recognized to present the following 
statement by the Second Baptist Church of Dunn. 

STATEMENT OF THE SECOND BAPTIST CHURCH, DUNN 5 

In the year of 1942 the First Baptist Church of Dunn, see- 
ing the need of extending the work of the Kingdom, established 
a mission in the vicinity called Enterprise. From this mission a 
Second Baptist Church was organized. 

Therefore, we, the members of the Second Baptist Church of 
Dunn do hereby make application for membership in the Little 
River Association. 

By action of the church Oct. 22 1944. 

E. C. Keller, Pastor 
— 

Rev. Sam Hudson moved that the Moderator appoint a com- 
mittee to consider the application of this church for member- 
ship in our association. Motion passed. The Moderator appointed 
C. D. Cain, Ruffin; J. G. Layton, H. G. Patterson, F. C. Maxwell. 

Rev. S. L. Morgan was introduced for the Annual Sermon. 

18 



Minutes of the Little River Baptist Association 

Brother Morgan asked Rev. E. C. Keller to read Romans 12 and 
lead in prayer. The subject of Brother Morgan's sermon was 
"Jesus Christ, the Same Yesterday, Today, and Forever." 

End of the Morning Session 



After a most gracious dinner served by the Holly Springs 
Church the association reassembled at 1 :45 P. M. for a season of 
song. The session opened with prayer by Rev. Scott Turner. 

The following visitors were recognized: Harvey Gibson, 
Raleigh; J. A. Easley, Wake Forest; Waldo Early, Fayetteville; 
Mrs. Waldo Early, Fayetteville; J. R. Puckett, Fayetteville. 

The following new pastors were recognized: Charles Baden, 
Odell Pulley, D. A. Tedder, H. M. Baker. 

All churches by this time had presented delegates and let- 
ters with the exception of Piney Grove. 

A report from Duncan Chapel was presented by Rev. Scott 
Turner who moved that the report become a part of the min- 
utes and that the association send greetings to Duncan Chapel. 
-Motion passed. 

REPORT FROM DUNCAN CHAPEL 6 

Enrollment 96 in Sunday School. 

Average attendance 60 

Literature „ $ 52.25 

Orphanage 21.73 

Missions 6.39 

Mother's Day 5.04 

Red Cross 11.00 

Love Offering 36.03 

Expenses 42.24 

Pastor 210.83 



Total $395.66 

Sunday School Superintendent Vation Pigram 

Secretary and Clerk P. W. Lawrence 

Treasurer Mrs. Alta Tutor 

o • 

Rev. Louis Morgan was recognized to present the report on 

19 



Minutes of the Little River Baptist Association 

the Revision of the Constitution. The revision was passed sec- 
tion by section and the completed form apepars in the front of 
the minutes. 

The report of the committee on Time, Place and Preacher 
was accepted as follows: Place — Chalybeate Springs. Preacher 
— Rev. C. E. Ruffin with Rev. L. J. Atkinson as alternate. Time 
— to be as defined in the constitution. 

The report of the Committee on The Admission of the 
Second Baptist Church of Dunn was favorable. The Association 
voted to accept this church and the pastor, C. E. Keller, was 
called forward with Mrs. Keller and M. B. Faircloth to be wel- 
comed by the Moderator on behalf of the the association. 

The report of the committee on Organization was accepted. 
See Directory in front of the minutes. 

The following recommendations from the Executive Com- 
mittee were read by Rev. Sam Hudson and accepted as read. 

RECOMMENDATIONS FROM THE EXECUTIVE 9 

COMMITTEE 

1. That the churches of the Association give careful attention 
to all the plans for the celebration of our "Century for Christ" 
program v^ith particular emphasis on evangelism. 

2. That our minutes this year be dedicated to Rev. G. T. 
Mills. 

3. That: 

a. We continue our present Associational Mission program 

b. We continue Miss Zula Rogers as our v^orker. 

c. We pay Miss Rogers a salary of $1800.00 

d. We furnish her expenses of 300.00 

e. We make the budget of $2100.00 

4. That the next associational meeting be just one day. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Sam F. Hudson, Chairman 

o — 

Rev. S. L. Morgan presented the problem of the non-resi- 
dent church members in the following motion: 1. That a com- 
mittee be appointed to study in our association the non-resident 
church member problem and bring what recommendations seem 
advisable to our next annual session. 2. That local clerks be 
asked to report next year the numbers of resident church mem- 

20 



Minutes of the Little River Baptist Association 

bers and the numbers of non-resident church members; that our 
associational clerk be instructed to provide columns in the tabu- 
lar report in the minutes for this division of church member- 
ship fugures. Motion passed. 

Bro. Truby Powell was recognized for the report on Chrrs- 
tian Literature which was accepted as follows. 

REPORT ON CHRISTIAN LITERATURE 10 

The Biblical Recorder has more than doubled its subscriptions 
this year. At present, we have 665 Recorders entering the homes 
of our people, wth 17 Recorder clubs. Angier, Buie's Creek, and 
Lillington have Recorders going into every home of the active 
church membership. 

The W. M. U. reports subscriptions to magazines as follows: 

Home Mission Magazine 60 

Royal Service 221 

The Window 32 

The Commission 80 

World Comrades 88 

The W. M. U. has recently established an associational library 
with approximately 100 books. These are already in circulation. 
Let's not consider that we have done our best until we have 
given each member of every church in our association the oppor- 
tunity to subscribe to these various magazines and to read these, 
books. 

Respectfully submitted, 
Truby A. Powell 
Rev. C. E. Ruffin was recognized for the report on Civic 
Righteousness and Temperance. This report was accepted as 
follows: 

CIVIC RIGHTEOUSNESS AND TEMPERANCE 

It is not always easy to be a Christian, and meet the issues, 
or problems, of the present age, in the true spirit of righteousness. 
Baptists believe that regeneration is a cardinal doctrine of our 
faith; nevertheless, as Christians, we must recognize the fact, 
that we are a part of a world society, and study problems of the 
present day, and lend our aid in seeking a solution of these 
problems. As Christians we must do this in the true spirit of the 
Great Teacher and Head of the Church. To do less would be to 
fail in the great task given us as disciples of our Master. We 
must, at all times, seek to find His way, then following his way 
we must be willing, no matter what our opinions, to apply His 

21 



Minutes of the Little River Baptist Association 



way in the gigantic task that faces the Christian forces in the 
years ahead. We must endeavor to solve them in harmony v^ith 
the high ideals of Him who is the sum total of all wisdom, and 
whose way is always right. The coming years will call upon us 
to lend our aid in the solution of many problems, not only in our 
land, but throughout the earth. How will we meet the challenge? 
This query cannot be dismissed with the wave of the hand. A dis- 
illusioned world demands an answer. 

WAR 

We are at war. This is to be deplored, whatever argument 
we may advance to justify the righteousness of our cause. That 
our cause is righteous and just, there can be no question. On this 
point we are all agreed. As Baptists, we are patriotic; we are 
praying for victory, and the defeat of those who would destroy 
us. However, as a church, or denomination, we dare not ask 
for the blessings of God upon war. Let us pray for victory, but 
at the same time ask Almighty Gcd to help us love our enemies, 
and to bring them into a saving knowledge of Jesus. God loves all 
mankind, though many of their deeds are hated by Him. As chil- 
dren of the Heavenly King, our supreme task is to make them 
know that there is something different in the Christian. We 
must inspire our enemies, by precept and example, to follow the 
Christian way of life. We must teach them that war is the oppo- 
site of the philosophy of love. We must teach him that love Is 
central in the teachings of Jesus, and prayerfully help him to fol- 
low the new commandments "To Love One Another." 
CHRISTIAN HELP TO THE STRICKEN PEOPLE OF THE WORLD 

To a man hungry and half clothed, the truth, but oft ill- 
timed statement, "Gcd loves you" is irony and makes no appeal. 
The coming years will bring increasing demands upon the Baptists 
and Christians throughout this country to aid in alleviating the 
stricken and suffering people of this world. When the cry comes 
for bread, we dare not give a stone, or for fish, a serpent. We 
must remember our Master said, "In as much as ye have done it 
unto one of the least of these, my brethren, ye have done it unto 
Me." To isolate ourselves, and live sumptuously, while a vast ma- 
jority of the people hunger, and suffer, and starve, is anything bui 
Christian. 

RACE QUESTION 

Our country has within its borders many nationalities. It 
is to be re/?retted that the race minority group question has been 
paramounted by a small clique, who have been unwilling to study 
the question in the full light of all circumstances. As Baptists we 
believe that every race group and creed should be given equal 
opportunity to live and work out their own salvation. We de- 

22 



Minutes of the, Little River Baptist Association 

plore the effort of some to shackle and slave; we believe all 
men are created equal in the sight of God, and should have the 
right to life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness. However, we 
believe that assistance can best be rendered, not as advocates of 
social equality, but in the true Christian spirit, calling upon all 
groups, whatever their race, color or creed to lift their own stand- 
ards, and promising to all whatever material and spiritual aid we 
can lend, and assuring them that our hopes and prayers are for 
them; and honestly trusting that the day will not be in the far 
distant future when all people from every land and clime, will 
enter into the abundant life. 

LOOSENESS OF MORALS AND JUVENILE DELINQUENCY 

One must advance with caution here, lest he cast a shadow 
upon the millions of Christians youths in our land, whose character 
is beyond reproach, and whose ideals are as high and noble as 
those of any generation. To do this would be an excusable act for 
which there could be no pardon. However, statistics show, in this 
country there is a juvenile problem of no small proportion, and if 
not corrected, threatens to undermine the very foundation upon 
which this nation was built. Baptists should be awakened by 
these reports from the various agencies established for the cor- 
rection of juvenile delinquencies. The need of the hour is a clari- 
on call to the high standards of morality as recorded in the Holy 
Word of God. 

ALCOHOL 

Aided by the indifference of many Christians and politicians, 
"Old Man Barley-corn" has discarded his ragged garments and 
left his dilapidated huts in the swamps and on the branches and 
moved into the hotels and cafes. He no longer peddles his wares 
in the alleys under the cover of darkness, but has moved up to 
.our main streets and assumes the role of a respectable business 
jnan. We call him the business manager of our all-too-popular A. 
B. C. Liquor Stores. Today, he has the appearance of a gentleman 
if respectability; but, be not deceived, he is the same "Old 
Wolf in Sheep's Clothing." His mission is always the same — to 
kill and destroy. He has no place in a Christian society. He is 
an intruder, and his offer of charity is the basis of hypocrisy. Yet 
he persists in his demands for a place of respectability, and when 
refused, points the accusing finger at the members of the various 
church groups, who, he says, voted to give him the place of re- 
spectability he now occupies. That we have a battle cannot be 
denied. That it will be long, we must agree. However, we must 
recognize that intemperance in anything is intolerable, but it is 
seen at its worst in the drinking of alcohol. To destroy this evil 
we must lend our influence, and give our money, to any cause or 

23 



Minutes of the Little River Baptist Association 

agency we are honestly assured will courageously and untiringly 
(and wisely work for the abolition of this evil from this fair land 
of ours. 

Respectfully submitted, 
W. M. Thomas 

o 

Miss Zula Rogers was recognized for a report of her work 
which was accepted as follows: 

MISS ROGERS' EEPORT 12 

Again each church had a Vacation Bible School. The total 
enrollment and average attendance were greater than last year. 

The Asscciational W. M. U. was one of two in North Carolina 
to reach the Standard of Excellence. 

The Training Union won three honors in the Regional B. T. 
U. Convention and two in the State Convention held in Ridgecrest. 
The Dunn Chorus, under the direction of Mrs. Henry Whitington 
won an "A" rating in the Hymn Festival, and eight Juniors rep- 
resenting the Holly Springs, Dunn, and Antioch churches won in 
the Memory Work Contest. 

The W. M. U. has started an asscciational Library, located in 
the asscciational office in Lillington. Library hours are from 9:30- 
12:00 A. M. Wednesday and Saturday. These books are yours — 
-Make use of them. 

Ten churches have increased their church membership, six 
S. S., four B. T. U., six W. M. U. membership, seven have increas- 
ed their local, eighteen their mission, and eleven their total gifts. 

As we look toward the future, may we recommend the fol- 
lowing: 

1. That we cooperate wholeheartedly with our state and as- 
scciational officers in making the Training Union Revival of No- 
vember 26-December 1, a g^eat success. 

2. That more training classes be held in each departtment of 
our church. 

3. That we continue to reach each church with a V. B. S. 
?. That we cooperate with our state and denominational 

leaders in doing our part in winning a million souls to Christ in 
1945. 

,. That we continue to encourage the churches to form fields. 

6. That we pause between the hours of 9 and 10 o'clock each 
day to pray definitely for spiritual leadership. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Zula Rogers, Asso. Missionary 
24 



Minutes of the Little River Baptist Association 

The clerk read the report from Bro. Owen Odum on the 
Ministers' Retirement program which was accepted as follows: 

REPORT ON MINISTERS' RETIREMENT PLAN 13 

The Relief and Annuity Board affords a long felt need for 
Baptist ministers of the Southern Baptist Convention. 

Th plan is simple. The church contributes four percent ol 
the pastor's salary. The minister contributes four percent of his 
salary. The State convention contributes eighteen dollars annu- 
ally. 

Let us hope and pray for the day when every church and 
pastor in the Little River Association shall be members of the Min- 
isters' Retirement Plan. 

There are six churches w^ith their pastors now members in 
the Little River Association. Erwin and Coats have enlisted in the 
plan this year. Let us hope that others will enlist in the near fu- 
ture. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Owen Odum 



Dr. J. A. Easley, of Wake Forest College, was recognized 
to speak on the subject of Christian College Education. 

Rev. Sam Hudson spoke concerning the contribution of Dr. 
Easley to our denominational life. He also made an appeal for 
funds to all educational causes especially to Campbell College. 

Bro. G. G. Page was recognized to present the following 
report on the Sunday Schools. The report was accepted as fol- 
lows: 

SUNDAY SCHOOL REPORT 14 

Every church in the association has a Sunday School. The 
total enrollment as shown by the letters from the churches is 5,297 
which is a loss of 362 under last year. The average attendance 
for this year is 5,585, a loss of 240. Our young people going into 
military service probably accounts for the loss in enrollment and 
this with the Polio ban accounts for the extra drop in attend- 
ance. The mission Sunday School at Duncan is also sponsored by 
our association. 

An association-wide training course was undertaken in April, 
but only about a third of the churches were reached. The fol- 

25 



Minutes of the Little River Baptist Association 

lowing awards were earned, Angier 16, Antioch 2, Baptist Grove 
9, Bethel 7, Dunn 30, Erwin 1, Macedonia 19, Oak Grove 10; a 
total of ninety-six awards to eight churches. 

Each church had a Vacation Bible School. The average en- 
rollment was eighty-six and the average attendance sixty-six. 
The negro Baptists in Lillington were assisted in a Vacation Bible 
School, one hundred and fifteen were enrolled with an average 
attendance of eighty-seven. 

We strongly urge every church to adopt The Standard of Ex- 
callence as a program of work, and that training courses be put 
on wherever possible. 

Respectfully submitted, 

G. G. Page 
o 



Rev. Sam Hudson was recognized to present the following 
report of the Training Union. The report was accepted as fol- 
lows: 

TRAINING UNION REPORT 15 

The Baptist Training Union is designed to give every mem- 
ber of the church the opportunity and thrill of participating in 
its work. The B. T. U. organization is a good plan, but to be 
effective the plan must be worked out by each individual church. 
It is a workable plan, but it will not work itself. It takes con- 
tinuous and energetic effort to work it. We do not need so much 
to report, or to talk about this particular organization, as we need 
the full hearted effort of all farsighted Christians in using- it to 
train our constitiency. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Sam F. Hudson 
o 

Brother Harvey Gibson, State B. T. U. Secretary v/as recog- 
nized to speak on the work of the Training Union and to present 
the matter of the associational campaign to begin November 26. 

Special prayer for our war service men and women and our 
enemies was led by Dr. J. A. Easley. 

The following comittee on Non-resident Church Member- 
ship was appointed by the Moderator: S. L. Morgan, Forrest 
Maxwell, G. Scott Turner. 

The Memorial Service for our dead was led by Mrs. J. G. 
Layton. See the special page at the back of the minutes. 

26 



Minutes of the Little River Baptist Association 

End of the Afternoon Session. 

The evening session opened with a season of hymn singing. 
Mrs. H. D. Wood, Jr., Angier, sang "The Lily of the Valley" ac- 
companied by Miss Bessie McNeill. Rev. L. E. Atkinson led in 
prayer. 

The report of the Resolutions Committee was read by Rev. 
L. J. Atkinson and adopted as follows: 

REPORT OF RESOLUTIONS COMMITTEE 16 

Be it resolved that the delegates representing Little River 
Association express their appreciation to Holy Springs Baptist 
Church for the w^arm reception extended and for the tasty lunch- 
eon served. 

Be it further resolved that our appreciation be expressed to 
the visiting speakers or the program for their inspiring message. 
Respectfully submitted, 

Laurie J. Atkinson, Chm. 
Charles Vaden 
Mrs. Berles Johnson 
o 

The clerk read the W. M. U. Report prepared by Mrs. 
Charles B. Howard. It was adopted as follows: 

REPORT OF W. M. U. 17 

In our association of 26 churches we nov^ have W. M. U. or- 
ganizations in 17. Last year we had them in only 15. Bethel 
and Oak Grove have our newest organizations. One new junior 
organization at Friendship brings the total of young people's groups 
to 60. 

Not a one of our 7 full-graded unions made the A-1 record 
for the past year, but the W. M. S. at Chalybeate Springs did at- 
tain that goal. And we are indeed happy to report that our as- 
sociational organization was one of the two in our state to reach 
all twelve points in the Standard for Associations, thus gaining 
the A-1 record. 

Interest in Mission Study seems to be mounting. We report 
442 women meeting in study classes. Last year for the same per- 
iod of time there were 359. This does not include the report for 
our boys and girls. Recently we have added a number of splen- 
did new books to our associational library. This was made possi- 
ble by a shower of pennies and silver by our women. Our li- 

27 



Minutes of the Little River Baptist Association 

brary is now located in the office of our missionary, Miss Rogers. 
We hope that many will make use of it. 

Eleven societies have reported during the year that they are 
in an organized way doing missionary work in their own com- 
munities with soul- winning as their chief objective. As an as- 
sociational Community Missions project we are now helping to 
furnish hymn books for the Negro prison camp in our midst . 

Our cooperative program goal for this year is $4,213.14. We 
have given $2,388.64 of this in three quarters. (The goal includes 
the young people's organizations, the gifts do not.) Our 100,000 
Club goal is $1700. We have in the same period of time given of 
this $1226.02. 

Tv/o executive committee meetings have been held, the first 
one in February being enlarged into a leadership conference. 
vAbcut 100 leaders attended this. Our annual meeting in April 
was also well attended. 

Pray with us that we may labor yet more fathfully for "we 
serve the Lord Christ" and are eager "that the generation to come 
might know." 
' Respectfully submitted, 

Mi^. Charles Ip. Howard, Supt. 



Rev. G. Scott Turner presented the report on Evangelism. 
It was adopted as follows: 

EVANGELISM 18 

The 26 churches reporting to this Association have 7,431 mem- 
bers and reported 200 baptisms. 

8 churches reported no additions by baptism. 

5 churches had not had a revival meeting. 

21 churches had one revival meeting. 

4 churches had two revival meetings. 

The First Baptist Church of Dunn reported the largest number 
baptized — 37. 

The Daily Vacation Bible Schools have been instrumental in 
leading quite a number to conversion and Church membership. 
Let it be noted there was only one baptism for every 37 members. 

We recommend that the churches and every organization of 
the churches join in celebrating the Centennial of the Southern 
Baptist Convention by placing great emphasis on the greatest of 
all our tasks — the winning of the lost to Christ. 

Respectfully submitted, .. 

G. Scott Turner 
28 



Minutes of the Little River Baptist Association 

Rev. Forrest Maxwell made a report on "Missions at Home 
and Abroad." It was adopted as follows: 

MISSIONS AT HOME AND ABROAD 19 

The thought of Missions is on the minds of Christians today 
perhaps as never before. But the determining factor is, what 
will they do about it? As to foreign missions, Dr. Charles E. 
pVIaddry, in his report says, "No man can forsee or foretell the 
future. We know not what the unfolding years have in store to*: 
this Board and its work, but we believe in the eternal and un- 
changing purpose of God to bring this prodigal and lost world back 
to himself, through the atoning mercy of a crucified, risen, and 
reigning Lord. To this supreme and challengmg task your For- 
eign Mission Board wholly commits itself now in the midst of in- 
sane and wasting war, and for that glorious and compelling cen- 
tury that lies just ahead." 

As to state missions, we recommend a searching study of the 
excellent book "Kingdom Building in North Carolina" by M. A. 
Huggins from which we quote: "But what of the churches in this 
critical period? What of our denomination? Shall we cease or 
limit our activities? God forbid! What, then should be the pro- 
gram of the churches and of our denomination in these dynamic 
times? We state our answer in four sentences. 

1. As the nation girds for war, let the churches, as never be- 
fore, assemble for worship. 

2. As the nation seeks to mobilize, let the churches seek to- 
evangelize. 

3. As the nation undertakes to protect itself, let the church 
undertake to extend itself. 

4. Let the church be the church. 

As to missionary activity in Little River Association during 
the past year, we report that: 

1. Dunn Mission Sunday School has become the Second Bap- 
tist Church of Dunn. 

2. Duncan Mission Sunday School has organized a B. T. U. 

3. Colored Churches have been assisted in Vacation Bible 
Schools, supplied with song books, and held missionary meetings 
together. 

4. Sunday services have been held in the county jail, county 
home, and prison camp. Cottage prayer meetings have been held 
in various parts of the Association. 

We recommend that: 

1. The ministers lay upon the hearts and minds of their 
people the subject of missions. 

29 



Minutes of the Little River Baptist Association 

2. All churches increase their gifts to missions. 

3. At least four missions Sunday Schools be set up at certain 
favorable points in Little River Association. 

4. Miss Zula Rogers be retained as Associational Missionary 
for another year. 

Respiectfully submitted, 
Forest Maxwell 

Miss Zula Rogers reports that her office hours are Wednes- 
day and Saturday 9:00 a. m. to 12:30 p. m. Residence Phone Lil- 
lington 2361, Post Of ice, Lillington. 

At the request of several, Rev. G. Scott Turner explained 
the "Century for Christ" movement of Southern Baptists. 

The Moderator presented Arthur Gillespie, James Gilles- 
pie, and Paul Gillespie, sons of Dr. A. S. Gillespie, our mission- 
ary to China. 

Rev. Forrest Maxwell presented Dr. A. S. Gillespie. 

Dr. Gillespie spoke from the text of Acts 1 :8. He gave an 
account of the birth of the Southern Baptist Convention, the 
beginnings of her mission work, especially in China, and chal- 
lenged the Association to the possibilities of the work in all 
fields now. 

Our session closed as Brother Gillespie led in prayer. 



30 



I 



f 



Minutes of the Little River Baptist Association 



Our Dead In Little River 



Rev. G. T. 
ANGIER— 

Mr. J. L. Johnson, Deacon 

Mrs. Richard Ovv^en 

Mrs. Flora Senter 

Mr. Windsor Surles 
ANTIOCH— 

Mr. R. W. O'Quinn 

Mr. W. C. Davis 

Miss Cora Weaver 

Mr. J. E. Byrd 

Mr. Raymond Brown 

Mr. J. E. Davis 
BAPTIST GROVE— 

Mrs. Mollie Dennis 

Mrs. Eddie Campbell 

Mrs. Anna Belle Cain 
BETHEI^ 

Mr. A. A. West 
BROADWAY— 

Miss Gloria Borneman 
BUIE'S CREEK— 

Mrs. G. G. Dean 

Mrs. Vann Ennis 

Mr. J. R. Mitchell 

Lt. James L. Teachey 
CHALYBEATE SPRINGS— 

Mr. S. W. Baker 

Mr. James Grady 

Mr. O. M. Bullock 

Mr. C. W. Matthews, Deacon 

Mr. A. A. Johnson 

Mrs. Gussie Haire 
CUMBERLAND UNION— 

Mr. Connie Sears, Deacon 



Mills, Pastor 
DUNN— 

Mrs. C. R. Vinson 

Miss Margaret Lucas 

Mr. J. F. Dail 

Mr. J. C. Jones 

Mr. R. H. Strickland 

Mrs. W. Samp Jackson 

Mrs. J. F. Byrnes 

Mr. A. B. Naylor 
ERWIN— 

Miss Agnes Parker 
FRIENDSHIP— 

Mr. H. E. Truelove 
HOLLY SPRINGS— 

Mrs. Evelyn Byrd 

Cpl. Cecil Patterson 

Mr. J. A. Buchanan, Deacon 

Mrs. J. A. Patterson 
KENNEBEC— 

Miss Mollie Perry 

Mr. A. R. Jones 

Mrs. Cora T. Adams 
MACEDONIA— 

Mr. H. D. Denson, Deacon 

Mr. Brantley Baker 
NEIL'S CREEK— 

Mr. Howard Butts 
OAK GROVE— 

Mrs. Callie Reardon 
RAWLS— 

Sgt. Wilson Rawls 
SWANNS— 

Mr. Paul James 

Mr. Troy Gales 

Mr. Henry Gales 



''And God shall wipe away all tears from their eyes. And 
there shall be no night there, for the Lord God giveth them light, 
and they shall reign forever and ever." 



31 



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inutes of the 

LittleRiver Baptist 
Association 

North Carolina 

70fh Annual Session 

held with 

Chalybeate Springs Baptist Church 
October Thirtieth 

1945 



The next annual session will be held Tuesday, October 
29, 1948, at Coats Baptist Church, Coats, N. C. 



Minutes of the 

Little River Baptist 
Association 

North Carolina 

70fh Annual Session 

held with 

Chalybeate Springs Baptist Church 
October Thirtieth 

1945 



The next annual session will be held Tuesday, October 
29, 1945, at Coats Baptist Church, Coats, N. C. 



Minutes of The Little River Baptist Association 



INDEX 



ASSOCIATIONAL DIRECTORY 35 

CONSTITUTION ,. 11 

HISTORICAL TABLE 46 

MESSENGERS TO THE ASSOCIATION 8 

OFFICERS OF THE ASSOCIATION 5 

OFFICERS OF THE ASSOCIATIONAL SUNDAY 

SCHOOL CONVENTION 6 

OUR BELOVED DEAD 34 

PROCEEDINGS BEGIN 13 

REPORTS— 

American Bible Society 18 

Associational Missionary 14 

B. T. U 30 

Beverage Alcohol — . 24 

Biblical Recorder 21 

Caring for the Motherless and Fatherless 19 

Christian Education . 31 

Evangelism 16 

Executive Committee 22 

Hospital 20 

Ministers' Retirement Plan 29 

Missions at Home and Abroad 16 

Resolutions 23 

Sunday Schools 26 

Treasurer's 27 

W. M. U 15 

SPECIAL OFFICERS 6 

STATISTICAL TABLES BEGIN 37 



Minutes of The Little River Baptist Association 

OFFICERS OF THE ASSOCIATION 

Moderator — Dr. L. H. Campbell Buie's Creek 

Vice-Moderator — Rev. Sam Hudson Lillington 

Clerk-Treasurer — Rev. H. D. Wood, Jr. Angier 

EXECUTIVE BOARD MEMBERS 

L. H. Campbell, Moderator Buie's Creek 

S. F. Hudson, Vice-Moderator Lillington 

Harry D. Wood, Jr., Clerk Angier 

G. G. Page, S. S. Supt Buie's Creek 

A. C. McCall, B. T. U. Director Bunnlevel 

Mrs. D. B. Andrews, W. M. U. Supt. Fuquay Springs 

Scott Turner, Supt. Evangelism Chalybeate Springs 

Miss Zula Rogers, Association Missionary Lillington 

Hervey Austin Fuquay Springs, R. F. D. 

C. D. Bain Dunn 

J. G. Layton Lillington 

L. J. Atkinson Lillington, Rt. 3 

ASSOCIATIONAL MISSIONARY 

Miss Zula Rogers Lillington 

STANDING COMMITTEES 

(None) 

OFFICERS OF ASSOCIATIONAL WOMAN'S AIJXILIARY 

Supt.— Mrs. D. B. Andrews Rt. 2, Fuquay Springs, N. C. 

Asst. Supt.— Mrs. R. L. Young Angier, N. C. 

Sec.-Treas- Mrs. H. H. Hamilton Lillington, N. C. 

Young People's Director— Mrs. S. L. Morgan, Jr. __ Dunn, N. C. 
Literature Chairman— Mrs. Joel G. Layton ___ Lillington, N. C. 



MiNtJTEs OF The Little River Baptist Association 

Mission Study Chairman — Mrs. Harry D. Wood, Jr Angier 

Community Missions Chmn. — Mrs. L. J. Atkinson, Lil'ton, R.3 
Stewardship Chmn. — Miss Lillian Draughon, R.5, Box 45, Dunn 

Training School Chairman — Mrs. I. K. Stafford Buies Creek 

JVlargaret Fund Chairman — Miss Mattie Bain Coats 

White Cross Chairman — Mrs. Wilton Byrd Bunnlevel 

R. A. Counsellor — Rev. S. L. Morgan, Jr. Dunn 

Chairman of Nominating Comm. — Mrs. J. R. Butler Coats 

OFFICERS OF ASSOCIATIONAL SUNDAY SCHOOL 

CONVENTION 

Gen. Supt. — G. G. Page Buie's Creek 

Supt. of Evangelism — G. Scott Turner Buie's Creek 

Supt. of Training — L. J. Atkinson Lillington, Route 3 

Vacation Bible Schools — Mrs. H. M. O'Quinn Mamers 

Extension — Mrs. L. J. Turlington Buie's Creek 

Adult— G. T. Proffitt Buie's Creek 

Intermediate — Mrs. R. A. Duncan Dunn 

Young People — Miss Sarah Martin Dunn 

Junior— Mrs. I. K. Stafford Buie's Creek 

Primary — Miss Mamie Haighwood Lillington 

Beginners — Miss H. H. Hamilton Lillington 

Cradle Roll— Mrs. C. L. Guy Dunn 

NOMINATIONS OF SPECIAL OFFICERS 

Chairman Christian Literature Mrs. J. G. Layton 

Chairman Orphanage Rev. Forest Maxwell 

Chairman Missions Rev. S. S. Morgan 

Chairman Temperance Dr. D. C. Woodall 

Chairman Hospital Mrs. Wilton Byrd 

Chairman Annuity Rev. Sam Hudson 

Chairman Christian Education Rev. Howard McLain 



Minutes of The Little River Baptist Association 

OFFICERS OF THE BAPTIST ASSOCIATIONAL 
TRAINING UNION 

Director— Rev. A. C. McCall Bunnlevel 

Associate — T. A. Powell Lillington 

Secretary — To be chosen by Director 

Pianist— Mrs. D. C. Woodall Erwin 

Chorister — Mrs. Henry Whitington Dunn 

Group Leaders — 

Mr. Berless Johnson Lillington 

Miss Erma Knight Broadway 

Herbert Hood Bunnlevel 

Story Hour Leader — Miss Addie Prevatte Buie's Creek 

Junior Leader — Miss Bessie McNeill Broadway 

Intermediate — Mrs. Lemon Powell Lillington, Rt. 3 

Young People — Miss Sarah Martin Dunn 

Adult — Miss Lillian Draughan Dunn 

ASSOCIATIONAL BROTHERHOOD REPRESENTATIVE 

(None) 

MAIN OFFICERS OF BAPTIST INSTITUTIONS FOUND 
IN THIS ASSOCIATION 

D. H. Senter, Member of Board of Trustees 

of Campbell Fuquay Springs 

Mrs. J. G. Layton, Member of Board of Trustees 

of Campbell Lillington 

S. L. Morgan, Jr., Member of General Board of Baptist 

State Convention Dunn 

ASSOCIATIONAL PRESBYTERY 

Rev. Lewis Morgan Dunn 

Rev. H. M. Baker Coats 

Rev. A. C. McCall Bunnlevel 

Rev. A. Paul Bagby Buie's Creek 

7 



Minutes of The Little River Baptist Association 



Messeng,ers to the Association 



ANGIER— 

C. W. Flowers 

James Flowers 

Mrs. Wm. Morgan 

Mrs. Allison L. Overby 

Mrs. Robert L. Young 
ANTIOCH— 

Mr. J. W. Byrd 

Mr. J. M. Weaver 

Mrs. W. E. Page 

Mrs. H. M. O'Quinn 

Mrs. Lola Brown 
BAPTIST CHAPEL— 

A. L. Smith 
BAPTIST GROVE— 

Rev. C. H. Norris 

Mrs. C. W. H. Lee 
BETHEL— 

Rev. F. A. Harris 

W. G. Elmore 
BROADWAY— 

N. M. Thomas 
BUIE'S CREEK— 

Leslie H. Campbell 

Leonora Dorsey 

E. A. Howard 

G. G. Page 
CHAL. SPRINGS— 

Mrs. D. B. Andrews 

Mrs. Kenneth Smith 

G. Scott Turner 
COATS— 

Mattie Bain 

Rev. H. M. Baker 

A. R. Byrd 

Owen Odum 



CUMB. UNION— 

J. O. Weathers 
DUNN 1st— 

C. D. Bain 

Mrs. George H. Britton 

Lillian Draughon 

Mrs. A. L. Guy 

Mrs. Henry Whittenton 
DUNN 2nd— 

M. B. Faircloth 

E. C. Keller 

B. O. Slaughter 
Mrs. R. B. Wright 

ERWIN EAST— 

O. W. Pulley 
ERWIN 1st— 

J. C. Barefoot 

Forest Maxwell 

J. H. McKnight 

A. D. Wonduntt 
FRIENDSHIP— 

F. M. Allen 
A. C. McCair 

C. A. Strickland 
HARMONY— 

A. P. Hall 

Mrs. A. P. Hall 
HOLLY SPRINGS— 

H. Y. Smith 
KENNEBEC— 

H. T. Lawrence 

M. T. Olive 
.AYTON'S CHAPEL— 

E. T. Hill 

Mrs. E. T. Hill 

Blanio Lucas 
8 



Minutes op The Little River Baptist Association 



MESSENGERS TO THE ASSOCIATION 



LILLINGTON— 
Mrs. A. G. Rickman 

JVIACEDONIA— 
C. T. Gray 
J. E. Holt 
Gertrude Smith 
Lena Weathers 

NEILLS CREEK— 
Berles C. Johnson 
Mrs. Berles C. Johnson 
Mrs. Hugh Johnson 
Mrs. C. B. Matthews 
Mrs. J. O. McLeod 

OAK GROVE— 
Mrs. C. K. Dew 
Mrs. G. C. Denton 
W. T. Walker 
. Mrs. W. L. Walker 



PINEY GROVE— 

J. C. Butts 

T. E. Smith 

Mrs. Joe Jackson 
PLEASANT MEMORY- 

Joe Belcher 

Mr. S. W. Turlington 
RAWLS— 

Hollis Fowler 

T. H. Gardner 

Beatrice Rawls 

Henry Rawls 
SWANNS STATION— 

A. R. Batchelor 

E. C. Womack 

Mrs. A. R. Batchelor 

R. Smith 



Minutes of The Little River Baptist Association 



Constitution 



1 This association shall be known as "The Little River Bap- 
tist Association." 

2. The object of this association shall be the advancement 
of the kingdom of Christ, ahd the means of accomplishing t^s 
shall be strict conformity with the principles of the New Testa- 
ment. 

3. The association shall have no authority over the internal 
rights of any church belonging to it and shall act only as an advisory 
council. 

4. The association shall be composed of messengers chos6n 
by the churches connected with it, each church being entitled to 
five delegates. Ordiained ministers having oversight of churches 
in the association, or having their membership in these churches, 
shall also be received as messengers. 

5. A quorum shall consist of messengers from a majority of 
the churches of the association. 

6. The delegates from each church to the annual meeting of 
the association shall bear a letter certifying their appointment 
and giving an account of the condition of the church and a state- 
ment of all funds contributed for local and benevolent purposes. 

7. The officers of the association shall be a moderator, a 
vice-moderator, a clerk and a treasurer, who shall be chosen an- 
nually from the members composing the association, and shall 
continue in office until their successors are elected. The term of 
office of the moderator shall begin at the conclusion of the session 
at which he is elected and continue until the close of the next 
annual meeting. 

8. It shall be the duty of the moderator to preside during the 
deliberations of the body, to enforce the observance of the consti- 
tution, preserve the decorum, appoint committees except when 
other provisions are made for their appointment, decide all questions 
of order, giving his opinion on any question under discussion, 
and cast the deciding vote in cast of a tie. 

9. It shall be the duty of the clerk to record the proceedings 
of each annual meeting of the association, superintend the printing 
of the minutes and their distribution among the churches. 

10. It shall be the duty of the treasurer to receive all funds 
sent by the churches or collected during the sessions of this body 
and to disburse the same for the objects stated. He shall present a 
report on all funds administered by him at each annual meeting. 

11 



Minutes of The Little River Baptist Association 

11. The association shall appoint, annually, a Promotion Com- 
mittee composed of one member from each church in the association 
and the pastors of the churches. The moderator shall be chairman 
of this committee. The function of this committee shall be the 
promotion of Associational plans through the several churches. 

12. The association shall appoint annually an Executive Com- 
mittee of 12 members, among vrhom by virtue of their office are 
to be the moderator, vice-moderator, clerk- treasurer, S. S. Supt. of 
the Association, Training Union Director, W. M. U. Superintendent, 
Supt. of Evangelism, the Associational Missionary. This committee 
shall have general supervision of the affairs of the association 
during the interval betw^een the meetings of the body; shall seek 
to promote the welfare of the churches, and their active participa- 
tion in the causes fostered by the denomination; but shall be 
answerable to the association for its acts, and make an annual report 
to the association of its work. 

13. The association in annual meeting shall appoint a pres- 
bytery of four members to sit with the pastor of any person whose 
ordination is sought, and the moderator of the association, to ex- 
amine the qualifications and opportunities for work of the candi- 
date. 

14. The association shaU hold an annual meeting commencing 
on Tuesday after the fourth Sunday in October. 

15. A meeting of the association may be called by the modera- 
tor at any time by the consent of five members of the Executive 
-Committee. Each church shall be notified of such a meeting in 
time to send delegates. 

16. This association shall have the right to exclude from its 
membership any church that departs from New Testament prin- 
ciples. 

17. Any church desiring to become a member of this asso- 
ciation may present a petition at the annual meeting of the body 
through delegates appointed for this purpose. If the association 
shall consent to receive such church the moderator shall extend 
the hand of fellowship to the delegates. 

18. The association may invite visitors to seats and extend to 
them all the privileges of delegates except that of voting. 

19. By appointment, at each annual meeting, an introductory 
sermon, and a sermon or address on missions shall be delivered. 

20. This constitution may be amended at any annual session, 
by a vote of two-thirds of the delegates present, provided that 
notice shaU be given before the day that such motion wiU be 
presented. 

12 



Minutes of The Little River Baptist Association 

Proceeding's 

LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 
OCTOBER 30, 1945 

The Little River Baptist association opened its 70th annual 
session at Chalybeate Springs Baptist Church at 10:00 a.m., 
Oct. 30, 1945. Brother T. L. Caviness led in the singing of the 
Hymn "How Firm a Foundation," Mrs. W. M. Pearson played 
the piano. "All Hail the Power of Jesus Name" was sung. The 
meeting was called to-order by Dr. L. H.Campbell, moderator. 
He made a few remarks concerning the history of this association. 
Rev. A. C. McCall, pastor of Friendship Baptist Church, read 
Acts 27:18-25, and after a few remarks were made led in prayer. 

A suggested program was presented and adopted with the 
reservation of provision for any modifications which might from 
time to time be necessary. Twenty-four churches were represent- 
ed in the roll and the other three were represented by their 
pastors. 

New pastors were recognized. Their names and churches are 
as follows: 

A. C. McCall— Friendship Baptist Church 

Aaron Phipps — Pleasant Memory. 

C. T. Gray — Macedonia 

Visitors recognized: 

Baxter Walker — New South River Association. 

J. A. McMillan from Thomasville Orphanage 

The clerk read the list of the dead from our churches and 
Rev. Scott Turner led in prayer. A list of the dead will be found 
in the back of these minutes. 

Dr. Campbell called for the organization of the association. 

Rev. Sam Hudson nominated Dr. L. H. Campbell for mod- 
erator. 

Brother H. Y. Smith moved to elect Brother Campbell and 
Rev. Sam Hudson took the chair. Brother Campbell was unani- 
mously elected. 

13 



Minutes of The Little River Baptist Association 

I. 

Rev. S. L. Morgan nominated Rev. Sam Hudson for Vice 
Moderator. He was unanimously elected. 

Brother Owen Odum nominated Rev. Harry D. Wood, Jr., 
for clerk. There were no other nominations and Brother Wood 
was unanimously elected. 

Miss Zula Rogers, association misionary was recognized and 
gave her report for the year. She made the following recommen- 
dations: 

ASSOCIATION MISSIONARY'S REPORT 

As we compare the reports of this year with last, we are happy 
to note many gains. Two churches have called full-time pastors, 
Dunn has a full-time educational director. All pastors but five are 
resident. 

Again all churches had a Vacational Bible School with an 
increase in enrollment, average attendance, and mission offering. 
In the Southwide Sunday School Clinic, Little River was recognized 
as the only association that has reached every church for six years 
with a Vacation Bible School. 

Two Sunday Schools, Angier and Antioch, have reached the 
Standard while others are striving toward this goal. Eleven churches 
participated in the Baptist Training Union Enlargement Campaign. 
Two others had a study course which brought the enrollment of the 
campaign to 908, average attendance 673, awards issued 500. Twelve 
new units have been added to the Training Union during the year. 

The Woman's Missionary Union has grown steadily. Five new 
organizations have been started, more mission Study Classes held, 
and renewed interest manifested in the young people's organizations. 

While we are grateful for these achievements let us not be 
satisfied until we are feeding all the multitude at our door and 
carrying the Gospel to the ends of the earth. 

May I suggest: 

1. That plans be made to reach all the unenlisted in each church 
territory. 

2. That more emphasis be placed on the training union and mission 
work in each church. 

3. That each church participates in the School of Missions, March 

10-15, 1946. 

4. That a religious survey be made of the Western section of the 
Association to determine the possibilities for organizing Mission 

Sunday Schools. 

Respectfully submitted, 
Zula Rogers 
14 



Minutes of The Little River Baptist Association 

These recommendations were referred to the executive com- 
mittee. 

Moderator Campbell brought his report. 

Rev. C. H. Norris, Pastor of Baptist Grove, moved that this 
report be published and Brother McMillan offered the services 
of Charity and Children. Motion passed. 

Under the topic "Achieving World Brotherhood through 
Missions" the following business was transacted: 

Mrs. D. B. Andrews, President of the Association W. M. U., 
was recognized for a report of the work of this organization. 

Rev. G. Scott Turner was recognized for a report on Asso- 
ciation Missions. Rev. C. E. Ruffin was recognized for a report of 
"Mssions at Home and Abroad." 

These three reports were adopted as follows: 

REPORT OF WOMAN'S MISSIONARY UNION 

In our association the work of the W. M. U. moves forward. 
We have organizations in 16 churches. Five new young peoples 
organizations bring encouragement to our ranks. 

For the past year our association reached eleven of the twelve 
points on the Standard of Associations. 

Thus for this year we report 513 women enrolled in Mission 
Study Classes. For the same period last year there were 442. This 
does not include the report for our boys and girls. 

Fourteen of our societies have reported that they are in an 
organized way engaged in missionary work in their own com- 
munities. 

Our cooperative program goal for this year is $4959.17. Of this 
amount we have given the first three quarters $2894.03. Our goal 
includes the goal for the young people's organizations. Our gifts 
do not. 

Three executive meetings have been held. The first taking the 
form of a leadership conference. Our annual meeting in April was 
well attended. Under direction of our Young People's Leader, 
camps for our boys and girls were held during the summer. 

These attainments bring joy to our hearts, but we are keenly 
aware that there remaineth yet very much land to be possessed, 
even in our own association. What a joyous service is ours, "having 
the everlasting gospel to preach unto these that dwell on the earth, 
and to every nation and kindred and tongue and people." 
Respectfully submitted, 

Mrs. D. B. Andrews 

15 



Minutes of The Little River Baptist Association 

REPORT ON ASSOCIATIONAL EVANGELISM 

This is the Centennial year of the Southern Baptist Convention. 
As an expression of their gratitude to God for the remarkable 
grov^^th and glorious achievements of these hundred years Baptists 
have undertaken, this year, a rededication to all the enterprises of 
our denomination with emphasis upon evangelism. This is, indeed, 
a worthy way of celebrating our Centennial. But there are higher 
motives than this for evangelism. It has pleased our Lord to give 
the task of winning this lost world to Him entirely to His redeemed 
people aided by His living presence. He depends upon us. He 
has no other plan. To us are entrusted the keys of the Kingdom of 
Heaven. Gratitude to our Saviour who, while we were yet sinners, 
gave Himself for us: compassion for our lost brother-men, living 
and dying without hope and without God. These are the motives 
that should move us, this year and every year God gives us, to do 
all that lies within our power to win men to Him. 

We earnestly offer to the association the following recom- 
mendations: 

1. That we faithfully and constantly endeavor to win the lost 
to Christ by prayer, by personal work and by the support of missions 
at home and abroad. 

2. That our pastors, in their regular services, from time to 
time, impress upon their people the duty of endeavoring to win the 
lost, and preach frequent evangelistic sermons. 

3. That this Association make definite plans to have the 
Gospel preached in the large unchurched sections of our territory 
and to the multitudes of people around us who seldom, if ever, 
attend church services. 

G. Scott Turner 

REPRT ON MSSIONS AT HOME AND ABROAD 

The Supreme command and business of the church is ail- 
conclusively stated in the words of Jesus, "Ye shall be my witnesses, 
both in Jerusalem, and in all Judea, and in Samaria, and unto the 
utmost parts of the earth." The response to this conmiand is found 
in the words of the chief apostle, "I am debtor to the Greeks and 
the Barbarians, both to the wise and to the foolish. So, as much 
as in me is, I am ready to preach the Gospel to you also that are 
in Rome. For I am not ashamed of the Gospel of Christ, for it is 
the power of God unto Salvation to everyone that believeth, to the 
Jew first, and also to the Greek." Thus Baptists believe that the 
field of missions is not limited to certain localities, but extends to 

16 



Minutes of The Little River Baptist Association 

all humanity. The sweetest verse in the Bible, "God so loved the 
world that He gave His only begotten Son, that whosoever believeth 
in Him shall not perish, but have everlasting life," proves to all 
Christians that missions is found in the heart of God, and is made 
expressive for all men in the gift of His Son. 

Here in our state and our southland the need for mission work 
was never more urgent. In our industrial centers, and in many 
of our rural communities a wave of materialism, unbelief, and 
un Americanism has swept over us with disastrous results. Many 
are unsettled in their beliefs, and many are resentful or even 
antagonistic toward religion. Many open doors are open to Baptists 
to carry the Gospel of grace and salvation to these communities, 
and only the Gospel of Christ can bring into harmony with the will 
of God these people who are unsettled in their beliefs and resentful 
toward God. Let's aid our state and Southern Boards in sending 
a large army of missionaries into these "fields that are white unto 
harvest." From across the seas comes the Macedonian cry. Hardened 
and bitter because of the hardships of war, the peoples of Europe 
and Asia are not deaf to the message of the Gosppel. Our Foreign 
Mission Board is looking forward toward the day when they can 
send a vast army of missionaries into these lands. Hospitals, schools, 
and churches, many reduced to rubble by bombs must be built. We 
will not fail them. Our churches should begin now a definite pro- 
gram of missions, so that when the opportune time comes, our 
boards will not be handicapped in any way as they launch out upon 
the greatest of all crusades. Why not the Slogan, "Christ for the 
whole world." Baptists have a message for the lost world. The hearts 
of many missionaries are longing to return to their fields of labor. 
The peace and security of a disillusioned world depends upon our 
generosity and unselfishness in the work of the Kingdom and our 
gifts to missions. We must not fail! 

Most repectfuUy submitted, 

C E. Ruff in. 

Brother Earl Bradley, Eastern Carolina General Missionary 
of our State Convention spoke on the subject of "World Brother- 
hood." He used as texts for his message Matthew 4:23 and 6:33. 

Brother and Mrs. W. L. Senter, members of the Kipling 
Methodist Church, were recognized. 

The Association sang "The Church's One Foundation.* 

Rev. Howard McLain was recognized for a report on the 
following subject: "Enlarging the Brotherhood through Sowing 

17 



Minutes of The Little River Baptist Association 

the Word in New Fields," a statement concerning the American 
Bible Society. It was adopted as follows: 

REPORT ON AMERICAN BIBLE SOCIETY 

The modern missionary movement and the Bible society move- 
ment have grov^n up together. Both have recognized the necessity 
of an "open Bible" — and the ability to read it — as basic to the es- 
tablishment and expansion of Christianity. However, the Bible so- 
ciety movement has developed on a "One Lord, One Word" basis, 
and has cooperated vvrith and received the cooperation of many de- 
nominations in the world-v^ide missionary enterprise. As one Bap- 
tist leader has said: "The American Bible Society has made possible 
the cooperative effort of American Christians in making available 
to the nations and races and tribes of the earth God's Holy Book." 

This American Bible Society has received increasing support 
from Southern Baptists, although the contributions of this Associa- 
tion approximately $225.00 given through the Baptist state office, 
were not an increase over the amount reported last year. For the 
next year the contributions to this cause should at least be doubled 
—a goal easily attainable if all the churches would make some gift. 
To further this work of "the wider distribution of the Holy Scrip- 
tures" each church should designate from its yearly budget and 
contributions a liberal amount for this part of Modern Missions. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Howard G. McClain 

The Moderator appointed the following committee on Time, 
Place and Preacher: 

Lois Morgan, Mrs. Berles Johnson, H. Y. Smith. 

The Committee on Resolutions: 

E. C. Keller, Mrs. H. W. Maness, J. C. Bullock. 

The Moderator called for Brother C. E. Ruffin, Pastor of 
Broadway Church, to preach the association sermon. He called 
for the singing of the hymn "My Jesus I Love Thee, ' after which 
he preached a challenging sermon on the text Acts 4:13. Being a. 
call consecration and a Christ-like life. 

The benediction closed the morning session. 

18 



Minutes of The Little River Baptist Association 

AFTERNOON SESSION 

The Chalybeate Springs Church spread a most delicious din- 
ner for us on the grounds. 

After a session of fellowship and hymn singing Brother 
Odwll Pulley led in prayer opening the afternoon session. 

Brother Earl Bradley was asked to present some of the de- 
tails of the Association School of Missions projected for March 
of 1946. 

Under the topic of "Caring for the Fatherless and Mother- 
less in Our Brotherhood." Brother C. D. Bain presented a re- 
port concerning the work of our orphanage. Brother J. A. McMil- 
lan spoke concerning the report. His plea was for strengthened 
spiritual homes. The report was adopted as follows: 

CARING FOR THE MOTHERLESS AND FATHERLESS 

No man who is worthy of being a father has to be urged to 
provide the necessities of living for his children. The more sensi- 
tive his appreciations are, the more eager he is to provide for them 
not only necessities but every opportunity for more abundant liv- 
ing, God pity the child whose father provides merely from a sense 
of duty! How fortunate the child who is the recipient of forward- 
looking love and care. 

When the good Samaritan saw in his pathway one in dire need, 
he ministered to his immediate needs and provided for continuous 
help until the unfortunate man could make his own way. He gave 
both personal service and money because first of all "he had com- 
passion on him". 

Our Baptist brotherhood finds all around us unfortunate child- 
ren from homes broken by death or by sin. The number is in- 
creasing. They are our responsibility and our opportunity. It is 
necessary only to call attention to the fact that their immediate 
need is for shelter, food, clothing and love; their continued need 
is for preparation, both spiritual and mental, which will fit them 
for life. The accepted way for us to minister to their need is 
hhrough: 

1. A worthy offering from each member of our churches 
at Thanksgiving; 

2. A month-by-month offering from our Sunday Schools. 
From information furnished by our Orphanage treasurer, it is 

gratifying that every church in our association has contributed to 
the Orphanage during the past year; that six churches sent mon«y^ 

19 



Minutes op The Little River Baptist Association 

as many as twelve times; that the total sum contributed amounted 
to $4,047.61. May we continue our ministry of compassion, s^ervice 
and support. 

Respectfully submitted,, 

C. D. Bain 

Brother H. E. Baker, Pastor of the Coats Baptist Church, 
presented the report from the Baptist Hospital at Winston-Sal- 
em. The report was adopted as follows: 

N. C. BAPTIST HOSPITAL 

The North Carolina Baptist Hospital was incorporated in 1922 
and received its first patient May 28, -1923. Originally planned as 
a 100-bed institution, it was enlarged in 1942 to a capacity of 247 
beds and 55 bassinets. 

The underlying purpose of the Baptist Hospital has always 
been medical care for the poor. Since the day it received its first 
patient it has offered a high type of hospital care on a statewide 
basis. Its caliber of service was enhanced many times over when 
the Wake Forest Medical School became a four-year school in 1941 
and was located adjacent to the Baptist Hospital. When the Baptist 
Hospital became a teaching hospital, its purpose became twofold- 
teaching and healing, the twin endeavors of Christ. 

The Baptist Hospital operates one of the fullest approved 
schools of nursing in the South, and at the present time has an en- 
rollment of about 150 young ladies receiving professional training 
under Christian auspices. The students are selected under very 
high standards. These students come from all over North Carolina 
and represent the highest type of womanhood— mentally, physical- 
ly and morally. While the most rigid scientific training is given the 
girls, the hospital takes great pride in the Christian and humane 
attitude it develops in these girls. 

Of the 8,000 patients admitted as bed patients each year, 
slightly over 4,000 of these are service patients who pay nc doc- 
tor's fee, and who pay but a slight portion of their hospital expens- 
es. During 1944 approximately 3,000 of these service patients paid 
absolutely nothing toward their hospital bill. It is toward the ex- 
pense of these patients that the money given on Mother's Day each 
year is used. In addition to the free bed patients the hospital, as 
stated above, gives diagnostic examinations to approximately 20,- 
000 free patients who are not admitted to the hospital each year. 
The cost to the hospital of free services rendered during 1944 was 
$198,648.92. 

20 



Minutes of The Little River Baptist Association 



The hospital has developed into one of the top ranking hospitals 
of our nation in the caliber of its medical work. In developing its 
medical program care has been taken that the spiritual atmosphere 
of the hospital should develop to the same measure. Emphasis is 
given at evsry turn, in its educational program, in its employees, 
and with its patients to the spiritual needs of ail coming in contact 
with the hospital. The religious program is under the direction of 
a full-time Chaplain and Student Secretary. This fine and fruitful 
service is made possible in part by the generosity of Mr. C. M. 
Scott of High Point, North Carolina, who contributes toward the 
cost cf the program. Due to the close touch which the nature of 
sickness allows the Chaplain to have with the patients, we have 
had many conversions and rededications in the hospital. 

North Carolina Baptists have developed in their hospital one 
of the greatest medical centers in our country, and at the same 
time one of the strongest influences for the cause of Christ that 
exists in any land. Its huge opportunities for serving as an agency 
of mercy,, as a means of teaching, and as a means of spreading the 
influence of Christ are a challenge to the generous heart of our 
great denomination that its program will not be restricted for lack 
of finances. All of its activities are operated on the highest of 
standards, and hence it requires a tremendous budget. It is self- 
supporting with the exception of its charity work, and it is for 
this merciful side of its program that North Carolina Baptists this 
year are giving over $100,000 through the Mother's Day program. 

Respectfully submitted, 

H. M. Baker 

Mrs. J. G. Layton presented the work of the Biblical Record- 
er with illustrations from current copies of the Recorder. Dr. L. 
L. Carpenter, editor of the Recorder spoke to this report. The 
report was adopted as follows: 

REPORT OF THE BIBLICAL RECORDER 

Into nearly 800 homes of Little River Associatoin there comes 
weekly a newsy, interesting and refreshing family letter; newsy, 
for it tells of Baptist brothers and sisters — where they are and what 
they are doing; interesting, because of its varied subject matter and 
its thought-provoking comments on timely topics; refreshing, for 
in reading it one is led from the routine of daily living to heights 
of world-wide vision. 

21 



Minutes of The Little River Baptist Association 



The Biblical Recorder has a circulation of about 34,000 which 
is a gain of approximately 7,500 in the past twelve months. The 
circulation is now more than three times what it was three years 
ago. 

Why this phenomenal growth? Because it is a wholesome, sub- 
stantial denominational journal — of interest to every member of 
the family. It is the organ of our Baptist State Convention and is 
of immense value in informing, training and enlisting our people 
in the whole program of the church and the Kingdom of God. 

Four churches — Dunn, Angler, Buie's Creek and Lillington — 
have inaugurated the Every Resident Member — Church Budget 
Plan. It is recommended that the plan be stressed and adopted in 
the other churches as soon as feasible. 

It is further recommended that every Baptist Church in the 
Association elect a Literature Chairman whose duty and privilege 
it shall be to solicit and renew subscriptions to the Biblical 
Recorder, Charity and Children, The Commission, Home Mission 
Magazine. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Mrs. J. G. Lay ton 

Brother Turner presented the report of the Executive Com- 
mittee. The report was adopted as follows: (with the exception 
of the officers of the Sunday School and Training Union and the 
Association Presbytery which will be found in the lists at the 
front of these minutes.) 

REPORT OF EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

We recommend: 

(1) That Miss Zula Rogers be continued as Associational Missionary 
with the same salary and expense account as this year. 

(2) That Miss Rogers be asked to take charge of a religious Survey 
of the western part of the county. 

(3) That the pastors' conference serve as a committee to arrange 
for the preaching of Gospel as recommended in the report on 
evangelism. 

(4) That the Clerk be paid $50 for his services. 

(5) That every church in the Association co-operate in the school 
of missions to be held in this Association Mar. 10-15. 

(6) That the thanks of the Association be extended to Mrs. J. G. 
Lay ton for her assistance to the Association Mission Program in 
furnishing an office. 

22 



MiNiTTEs OF The Little River Baptist Association 

(7) That a mimeograph be purchased for the Associational Mission- 
ary's office. 

Respectfully submitted, 

G. Scott Turner for the 

Executive Committee 

Mrs. J. G. Layton moved that Campbell College have a per- 
manent place in our Association's programs. Motion unanimously 
passed. 

The Report on Time, Place, and Preacher gave the following 
report: Time as specified in the Constitution, place Coats Baptist 
Church, Preacher Rev. L. J. Atkinson wth Rev. Forest Maxwell 
as alternate. Report adopted. 

Brother E. C. Keller presented the following report on Reso- 
lutions: 

REPORT ON RESOLUTIONS 

Be it resolved that we the delegates of the Little River Baptist 
Association express to the Chalybeate Springs Baptist Church our 
appreciation for their untiring efforts in making this meeting a 
success, for their warm reception and for the two wonderful dinners. 

Be it further resolved that we express our appreciation 
especially to those ministers from outside our association for their 
inspiring messages. 

Be it further resolved that we pray more earnestly, work more 
fervently and give more freely that this Gospel which we have 
received may be speeded to the utmost parts of the world. 

E. C. Keller 

J. C. Bullock 

Mrs. N. W. Maness 

Brother C. E. Ruffin presented a report on "Keeping De- 
structive Forces from Wrecking the Peace and Happiness of the 
Brotherhood," being a commentary on the use of beverage alco- 
hol. The report was adopted as follows: 

23 



Minutes of The Little River Baptist Association 

EEPORT ON BEVERAGE ALCOHOL 

KEEPING DESTRUCTIVE FORCES FROM WRECKING THE 
PEACE AND HAPPINESS OF THE BROTHERHOOD! 

Our world is sick. We have passed through the greatest 
disaster of this or any other age. Hopeful men , wished and prayed 
for a change for the better. This has not taken place. War does 
not change men for the better, for the experience of the past proves 
that men are not basically changed by disaster. We had hoped 
that the millions of young men called to the colors, and who, 
for the past few years have endured the privations and sufferings 
of war, would return with a living faith on God and a burning 
passion to see the evil of war and the evils associated with war, 
eradicated from the earth. For this we waited in vain. Rather 
we have witnessed the very opposite. Those who drank occasionally 
returned hardened drunkards; those who were careless of sex 
morality, many came back slimy in this respect; those who despised 
or did not care for God became more brazen in their Scorn. History 
has shown that no revival of religion ever began or was fostered 
by war and its kindred evils. However, the picture is not all dark, 
for, to the heart-warming joy of all Christians, many who went 
forth to the battle loving God a little returned with a fiery devotion 
to Him, and a burning passion that^ His righteousness cover the 
sea. But this truth is self-evident: Our civilization is sick, so sick 
that many are asking: "Will our civilization survive, and, if so, 
what kind of civilization will it be?" 

The evil maladies that afflict and threaten our civilization are 
multitudenous; yea, far too many to mention in this report. There- 
fore, we will discuss the four major ills that threaten to destroy our 
civilizations, in the destruction of which, the peace and happiness 
of the brotherhood would suffer drastically. They are (1) The 
menace of war; (2) The liquor evil; (3) The desecration of the 
Sabbath, and (4) The juvenile deliquency problem. Shall we look 
at them in brief, and there try to discover a remedy for these 
threatening ills. 

First, war is wrong. On this one point all are agreed. As to 
the cause of war, there is no united agreement among men Many 
and varied are the opinions as to the cause of war, but united 
is the opinion that Christians should be willing to serve their 
country, in life and in death, but we should beware lest we stray 
and prove the teachings of our master, who said, "To live by the 
Sword is to perish by the sword," and weaken our influence and 
power by glorifying war.. The one and only antidote for war is 
Christian love, a love that reaches a helping hand to those la 
distress, even our enemies. 

24 



Minutes of The Little River Baptist Association 

Second. In these tragic days of changing Kingdoms and crumb- 
ling empires, when our civilization is passing through the birth-pains 
of a new era, and an awesome fear is gripping the hearts of 
humanty, it is well to remember that drink undermined by-gone 
nations and led them to their down-fall. 

Babylon, Ninevah, and Sodom tarried all too long at the cup, 
and in their drunkenness slipped over the abyss and into destruc- 
tion and oblivion. If, as some one has said, to be fore-warned is to 
be fore-armed, we should take heed from the lessons of the past. 
The Almighty does not give us here in the "Land of the Free and 
Home of the Brave" an assurance that we can or will survive if we 
continue to allow this m.enacing evil to remain among us. Our 
leaders, whose duty it is to make it easy for the people to do right 
and hard for them to do wrong, have stubbornly refused to allow 
the people of this state the vote on this question. For this they 
stand in just condemnation before the entire electorate of a state 
that for long has boasted of its democracy. We scream for a just 
vengeance upon the leaders of the horror camps of Nazi Germany, 
and yet, while millions die, while mothers weep, while waiting 
justice seems to sleep, the politicians continue to allow this leader 
of crime and suffering to exist among us. How long will an outraged 
public allow this beast to remain in power. The answer is problem- 
atical. 

Third. The desecration of the Lord's Day is in evidence every- 
where. The Holy Scriptures warn us, "The nation that forgets God 
shall surely perish." Here again, the voice of the past must be 
heard. France, following the revolution, sought to substitute one 
day in ten, rather than one day in seven, as commanded by the 
word of God. For the God of Heaven, she would have her own 
"goddess of reason." Did France succeed. The answer is all too 
self-evident. Here are pitiful, yet true, facts. In World War II, 
Germany swept around the Maginot Line, blitzed into France, and 
in a few days, insofar as France was concerned, the war was over. 
Pay-day had come, she paid in blood and tears for her past crime. 
Will our sins bring repentance, or will some evil fate over-take us 
because of our stubborn refusal to live by the Holy Word of God. 

Fourth. That we are in a tidal wave of child deliquency no 
one will question. Those most concerned are asking how this tidal 
wave can be stopped. The answer is not easy. The F. B. I. in one 
of its reports on crime states that arrests of boys and girls have 
increased almost 18 per cent, and increase of young girls for the 
offense against common decency has reached the staggering high of 

25 



Minutes of The Little River Baptist Association 



89 per cent. More persons eighteen years of age were arrested 
last year than any other group, and 25 per cent of the charges for 
sex affenses, gambling, and drunkenness were made against 
juveniles. These figures are for both sexes, but with girls (and 
this is alarming) there has been a 38 per cent or over step-up in 
crime The reasons for this increase in juvenile delinquency are 
many, but time and space forbids discussion of some of the 
remidial measures necessary to check this awful condition that is 
existing among us today. Something must be done. 

These and many kindred ills threaten the peace and happiness 

°^ ^ MayTsugges't three approaches that I believe will aid in healing 
our sin-sick civilization. 

(1) There must be a readjustaent in the home. It will not be 

easy but here It must start. People must be shown the way, and 

hT;S to make good men and women is to ''egin with the chUd^ 

Obedience to home authority should be demanded, but ™ly ^^ 

°a*ers and mothers who set the right example have a right to 

demand iilial obedience. ,.efnrmed society 

(2) We must have a regenerated society. A "^^^ °™«'? ^""^^^ 

is not enough. Our moral standards are low, they must be lifted 

back to the heights of cleanness, sobriety, unselfishness and 

"''"^S^'The church must reaffirm its allegiance to the Lord-ship 
01 ,Z ^rTL. must ever ^!^ ^^^^l^J^X^^ ^^^ who 
and teach all men the need of ^^f ^J,^ ^ of ghteou^nes's are 

t^T^r:^ ^ ?^-:r-*'°"' ^'"'^ "^^ 

eventually bring doom to the impenitent sinner. 

Respectfully submitted, 

W. M. Thomas. 
Brother G. G. Page made the report on the work of the Sun- 
day Schools. He spoke briefly to this report. The report was 
adopted as follows. 

REPORT ON SUNDAY SCHOOLS 

our Sunday School work is not -^>^*"t -«='^f "^VbyThe 
but is going forward. The program of work as set fortn by the 

26 



Minutes of The Little River Baptist Association 

27 churches has a school and the Duncan mission is fostered by the 
organization. 

Our work is organized according to the plan of the convention 
with the follov^^ing officers: General Supt., Secretary, Associate 
Supt. in charge of training, Associate Supt. in charge of evangelism; 
four group superintendents and nine department superintendents. 
This roster is found in the directory of the association. We have 
had meetings as follows during the year: cabinet meeting in 
January, two association- wide meetings of all workers, two groups 
have had two meetings each and two groups one each. All the 
meetings were well attended and much interest was expressed. 

The total enrollment for the year of all schools is 6,046, a gain 
of 540 over last year. 28 Vacation Bible Schools were held, one 
in each church and one at Duncan mission. The total enrollment 
was 2,110, a gain of 628 over last year. We are still leading the 
entire Southern Baptist Convention in Vacation Bible School work. 
The training supt. reports some progress in the vital work. The 
supt. of evangelism reports 278 Baptisms from the Sunday Schools. 

While some of our churches have made considerable improve- 
ment in their building facilities most of our Sunday Schools are In 
much need of better building accommodations. We make two 
recommendations: viz. that the Standard of Excellence be kept 
regularly before our churches as a program of work for the Sunday 
Schools and that better buildings be provided as fast as possible. 

Respectfully submitted, 

G. G. Page 

Brother S. L. Morgan presented the need for a chapel on the 
campus at the Southern Seminary in Louisville, Ky. 

The treasurer's report was presented and adopted as follows: 

TREASURER'S REPORT 

TO THE LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 

October 30, 1945 

Receipts: since Oct. 24, 1944: 

Balance in 1st Citizens Bank $579.58 

Angier 208.00 

Antioch 240.00 

Baptist Chapel 6.00 

Baptist Grove 30.50 

Bethel 18.31 

27 



Minutes of The Little River B aptist Association 

Broadway 12.00 

Buies Creek 210.00 

Chalybeate Springs 127.00 

Coats 50.00 

Cl3^berland Union 112.89 

Dunn, First 340.00 

Dunn, Second 5.00 

Erwin, East 10.00 

Erwin, First 155.00 

Friendship 30.00 

Harmony 40.00 

Holly Springs 55.00 

Kennebec 40.00 

Layton's Chapel 3.00 

Lillington 215.00 

Macedonia 25.00 

Neills Creek '. 130.00 

Oak Grove 27.00 

Piney Grove ,- 5.00 

Pleasant Memory 12.00 

Rawls 2.00 

Swann Station 15.00 



TOTAL RECEIPTS $2703.28 

Disbursed to Oct. 27, 1945: 

Zula Rogers' salary :.$1800.00 

Expense account 300.00 

2100.00 

Annuity 72.00 

American Bible Society 44.45 

Kennebec to Cooperative Program 36.01 

Minutes, Clerk, etc 158.88 

$2411.34 

First Citizens Bank Balance 291.94 

$2703.28 

All checks, bank statements, records of church contributions 
and the like are on the clerk's desk for examination. 
October 27, 1945 Respectfully submitted, 

Harry D. Wood, Jr., Treas. 

28 



Minutes or The Little River Baptist Association 



Brother C. E. Ruffin moved that Dr. A. P. Bdg:ley be sertt 
a letter of welcome to this Association. He will soon come as 
pastor of the Buie's Creek Church. Motion passed. 

Brother J. G. Lay ton moved that we adjourn. Brother Owen 
©dum led in prayer which closed our afternoon session. 

EVENING SESSION 

An excellent supper was served by the Chalybeate Springs 
Church and a very large number of messengers and visitors stay- 
ed for the meal and the fellowship. 

Some time before the evening service began Brother B. O. 
Slaughter led in some informal singing. This was enjoyed by a 
church full of singing Baptists and friends. Mrs. W. M. Pearson 
played the piano for the singing. 

The Evening session was officially opened as Brother Forest 
Maxwell led in prayer. 

Brother David Henry Senter was asked to give a few histori- 
cal remarks about the Chalybeate Springs Church and commun- 
ity. This he did in a most interesting way. 

Brother L. J. Atkinson was recognized for a report on the 
Ministers* Retirement Plan. The report was adopted as follows: 

REPORT ON MINISTERS' RETIREMENT PLAN 

The first certificate of participation was issued in South Caro- 
lina, July 1, 1938, and in all other states since. Thus the Plan is 
still in its infancy. 

Already, over 8,000 preachers hold certificates and more than 
ten thousand churches are making regular contributions, a phenotn- 
enal record of growth. 

The goal was at least ten thousand preachers in the Plan by 
the Centennial Convention, May 1945. This goal was reached. 

Of all the amazing developments recorded in the one hundred 
years of the Convention, nothing is of greater significance, or offers 
larger promise for the future of our denomination than the Mmisters 
Retirement Plan. 

In 1944 the income of the Board was $2,136,867.98. Total assets 
almost $8,000,000.00 at the close of the year. 

There were, at the close of the year 7,970 active members, and 
11,480 cooperating churches, boards, and institutions. 



Minutes of The Little River Baptist Association 



Relief and annuity benefits paid were $774,142.99 to 
1,647 annuitants. 

In our own State, there have been only 653 certificates of 
membership issued, some of these have passed on to their reward, 
others have retired and some have moved to other states. 

In our own Association, only six ministers and six churches 
have felt the need of the protection offered by the Ministers Retire- 
ment Plan. 

Your committee urges that every preacher and church worker 
avail themselves of the benefits that lay within their reach by 
coming into this great organization. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Laurie J. Atkinson. 

Rev. Sam Hudson was recognized for a report on the B.T.U. 
He presented Miss Priscella Lyon who sang "I Walked Today 
Where Jesus Walked ' while Miss Gwendolyn Welborn accom- 
panied her. Brother Hudson spoke briefly to the report. The re- 
port was adopted as follows: 

REPORT ON BAPTIST TRAINING UNION 

The idea at the bottom of the Baptist Training Union is to use 
every member of a Baptist Church in intelligent action. Its objective 
is to give every Baptist the ability to give a good account of himself. 

There are eleven churches in the Association with Training 
Union work, and 43 Unions, with an enrollment of 836. At the 
beginning of the Associational year, we had an enlargement cam- 
paign in eleven churches with beneficial results. 

War economy, and war psychology have made the work very 
difficult, but it should be carried on regardless of all difficulties. 
The goal should be to establish the work in all the 27 churches of 
the Association. All intelligent church leaders are called on to 
give the matter the most prayerful consideration. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Sam F. Hudson 

Misses Anne Jones, Dorothy Fonville, and Janell Moody, stu- 
dents at Campbell College sang "Breathe On Me, Breath of 
God." 

The following ministerial students (some of 18) were pre- 
sented to the Association by Rev. O. W. Pulley: 

30 



Minutes of The Little River Baptist Association 

Frank Caldwell, Joe Belcher, Garland Foushee, Bruce Wil- 
son, James Cory, Spencer Inze, Roy Parker. 

Miss Lenora Dorsey, of Meredith College presented a state- 
ment concerning Meredith College and Christian Education. 

REPORT ON CHRISTIAN EDUCATION 

As we embark upon an era of supposed peace, we look to our 
Christian institutions to show us "the things that make for peace."* 
Inherent in the Christian faith are the ideals upon which world 
cooperation depends: the recognition of the dignity of man baseci 
on his potential holiness, the brotherhood of all mankind, unselfish- 
ness in choice of vocation and in conduct, and recognition of 
spiritual values. 

The Christian religion seeks to set its youth upon a quest for 
knowledge of God and spiritually motivated service. In denomina- 
tional schools religion can be foundation, not mere adjunct, hence 
from these schools come a large portion of the type of leaders we 
need in business, industry, politics, international organization, as 
well as in affairs of church. All colleges can join in the search for 
truth in many realms, but only the Christian college is free to 
declare that in the truth already revealed in Christianity all other 
truths must find their meaning. 

We are concerned that our Baptist colleges shall be equipped 
to do as good a job as any in developing such educational skills 
as ability to think, to express one's thoughts intelligently and 
accurately, to do computations, to understand the experimental 
method. We are sure Christian schools can do more than the others 
in helping youth set his goals and take his place in social living. 
Hence these institutions ask that all who comprise the staff be 
persons with deep religious experiences to share, conscious of a 
call to the task at hand, and therefore counsellors in spiritual as 
v/ell as vocational and personal problems. The Christian religion 
underlies the whole program and is presented to each student 
persuasively, though of course without compulsion to accept. 

The presence on our coeducational campuses of veterans of 
World War II add reality to our efforts to show how Christianity 
can meet all personal and social needs. In a sense they are both 
teachers and learners, helping us as we seek to adapt both educa- 
tional philosophy, curriculum, and religious programs to meet the 
needs of today and tomorrow and to provide a spiritual foundation 
for answers to men's insistent queries as to method when most of 
the pronouncements of post-war ideals are made. Grateful as we 

31 



MINUTES OF The Little River Baptist Association 

are for every allusion to Christian principle by men in high place, 
we look to Christian colleges to provide the future with even more 
such leaders. 

The Baptist colleges are your schools. They will serve you to 
whatever extent you permit. You should believe in them. You can 
test them in terms of the members of your own churches who attend 
them. But when you evaluate an institution, you will judge fairly 
only if you examine total program and accomplishments rather 
than minutiae of administration or program. 

We at the college within your bounds invite you: to strengthen 
the college by praying that we may meet the challenge of the Master 
and of the day in which we live, to enhance its value and broaden 
its possible sphere of influence by giving money to increase and 
improve its facilities and its ability to pay attractive salaries, to give 
the institution an opportunity to exhibit its love and patience by 
sending to it students poor in means or ablity, and to do both 
the college and Kingdom the service of directing there the most 
able from among your young folks. 

Visit your colleges. You will find them supporting the denomin- 
ational programs. You will see them at work teaching young men 
and women that the only way to gain life is through losing one's 
self in Christ. You will hear them talking about "the things 
that make for peace": unselfishness, cooperation, tolerance, service, 
truth, freedom. You will feel the certainty of worship. You will 
note an everyday emphasis on the Bible. You will be aware of an 
attempt at Christian democratic living. You will know they are 
proclaiming a faith that unites as brothers all who name the name 
of Christ. They will do these things as effectively as your support 

permits. 

Respectfulyl submitted, 

Leonora A. Dorsey 

The suggested Executive Committee was read and adopted 
as given in the front of these minutes. 

Brother Scott Turner was recognized, who after appropriate 
remarks concerning our 600 in attendance made a motion that 
only the maximum number of five messengers from each church 
be printed in the Minutes. Motion adopted. 

The Moderator presented the principal of the Coats School 
Hal Smith and Principal Henry Hamilton of Lillington and Miss 
Ophelia Matthews of Campbell College. 

Our moderator spoke briefly concerning the life and work 

32 



Minutes of The Little River Baptist Association 

of former Governor J. Melville Broughton and presented him 
to the association. 

Governor Broughton spoke on the subject of Christian Edu- 
cation. 

In closing the session and this annual meeting we sang: 
''Blest Be The Tie That Binds Our Hearts in Christian Love" and 
Brother H. D. Wood pronounced the benediction. 

AUXILIARY MEETINGS 

The Association W. M. U., Sunday School, and Baptist Train- 
ing Union meet separately from the general sessions of the As- 
sociation. Their work is indicated in the tables and their var- 
ious reports. 



33 



Minutes of The Little River Baptist Association 



Our Beloved Dead 



ANGIER— 

Mr. Allie Ray Currin 

Mr. J. A Hockaday 

Mrs. Alice Lee 
ANTIOCH— 

John E. Davis 

J. A. Honicutt 

Mr. Silas Salmon 

Hubert Stewart 

Mrs. E. M. Ussery 
BAPTIST CHAPEL— 

Mr. Prentise Thomas 
BAPTIST GROVE— 

Mr. W. H. Gilbert 

Mrs. Mary Francis Spener 

Mrs. Lillie Watkins 
BETHEL— 

Mrs. Thelma Hancy 

Mr. C. B. West 
BUIE'S CREEK— 

Mr. Waymon Melvin Byrd 

Sgt. Fred M. Caudell 

Mrs. Mamie Collier Johnson 

Sgt. Orus Johnson 

Mr. Neil Archie Matthews 
CHALBEATE SPRINGS— 

Mr. W. J. Norris 
DUNN, FIRST— 

Mr. C. E. Broughton 

PhM2-c Francis Broughton 

Mr. James Hobbs 

S-Sgt. Sherwood Jernigan 

Mr. I. M. Reams 

Mrs. Landis Turner 
EAST ERWIN— 

Tech. Sgt. Wiliam M. Stone 

Mrs. Collie Strickland 



ERWIN, FIRST— 

Mr. Gibson Fann 

Mrs. C. W. Giles 
FRIENDSHIP— 

■ Mr. W. M. Bethune 

Mr. C. M. Byrd 
HARMONY— 

Mrs. A. E. Morgan 
HOLLY SPRINGS— 

Pvt. Carlie Wilson 
LILLINGTON— 

Mr. L. A. Bethune 

Mr. M. R. Edwards 

Mr. Otic Matthews 

Mr. Willie Salmon 
MACEDONIA— 

Mr. Whitt Smith (in service) 
NEILL'S CREEK— 

Mrs. Lucy Arrington 

Mrs. Catherine Campbell 

Mrs. Edith Matthews 

Mrs. MoUie Matthews 
OAK GROVE— 

Mrs. Hughie Byrd 

Mr. N. I. Reardon 
PINEY GROVE— 

Mrs. Ammie Utley 

Mrs. Louisa Smith 

Mr. Lonnie Stephens 

Mrs. Delia Stephenson 

Mrs. Ardell Weathers 
RAWLS— 
Mr. Lloyd Babb 

Mr. R. G. Barker 
SWANN'S STATION— 

Mrs. Myrtle Fore 



34 



Minutes of The Little River Baptist Association 

ORDAINED MINISTERS WHO ARE PASTORS 

R. E. Atkins 27 Dixie Trail, Raleigh 

L. J. Atkinson . Lillington 

J. P. Bagby Buies Creek 

H. M. Baker Coats 

J. F. Blackmon Buie's Creek 

G. M. Graham Goldston 

C. T. Gray New Hill 

C. B. Howard Buie's Creek 

Sam F. Hudson Lillington 

E. C. Keller Dunn, Rt. 1 

Forest Maxwell Erwin 

A. C. McCall Bunnlevel 

S. L. Morgan Dunn 

C. H. Norris Wake Forest 

Aaron Phipps Buie's Creek 

O. W. Pulley Buie's Creek 

C. E. Ruffin Broadway 

G. Scott Turner Chalybeate Springs 

T. H. WilHams Gary 

Harry D. Wood, Jr. Angier 

ORDAINED MINISTERS WHO ARE NOT PASTORS 

J. E. Ayscue Buie's Creek 

W. T. Campbell Fuquay Springs, Rt. 2 

R. F. Hall Lillington 

Julius Holloway Buie's Creek 

F. A. Harris Manchester 

Horace Jones Louisville, Ky. 

Lester Mann Durham 

Howard McClain Buie's Creek 

Connell Smith Fuquay Springs, Rt. 2 

STUDENTS FOR THE MINISTRY 

Cpl. H. A. Dechent Buie's Creek 

Norris Grisson Coats 

35 



Minutes of The Little River Baptist Association 

EDUCATIONAL DIRECTORS 

Dunn, First — Miss Sarah Martin Dunn, N. C. 

MINISTERS ORDAINED THIS YEAR 

Connell Smith (Student) Fuquay Springs, Rt. 2 

Chalybeate Springs — 

SONG LEADERS OR CHOIR DIRECTORS 

Angier Mrs. Harry D. Wood, Jr., Angier, N. C. 

Antioch Mrs. E. L. Powell, Mamers, N. C. 

Baptist Grove Miss Wilma Sexton, Fuquay Springs, N. C. 

Bethel Mr. Leland Matthews, Linden, N. C. 

Broadway Mrs. L. P. Beck, Broadway, N. C. 

Buie's Creek Mr. A. E. Lynch, Buie's Creek, N. C. 

Chalybeate Springs __ Mr. T. L. Caviness, Fuquay Springs, N. C. 

Coats Mr. Morris Grissom, Coats, N. C. 

Cumberland Union — Mr. J. O. Weathers, Fuquay Springs, N. C. 

Dunn, First Mrs. C. C. Upchurch, Dunn, N. C. 

Mrs. H. W. Whittenton, Dunn, N. C. 

Dunn, Second Mr. Bennie Slaughter, Dunn, N. C, Rt. 2 

East Erwin Mr. George Houston, Erwin, N. C. 

Erwin, First Mrs. C. L. Byrd, Erwin, N. C, Rt. 1 

Friendship Mr. W. L. Byrd, Erwin, N. C, Rt. 1 

Harmony _> Mr. H. S. Hedgpeth, Bunlevel, N. C. 

Holly Springs Mr. Willie Nordan, Broadway, N. C. 

Kennebec Mr. N. T. McLean, Willow Springs, N. C. 

Macedonia Mr. Leo Weathers, Holly Springs, N. C, Rt. 1 

Neill s Creek Mrs. Berles Johnson, Lillington, N. C, Rt. 1 

Rawls Mr. Henry Rawls, Fuquay Springs, N. C, Rt. 1 

Swanns Station Mr. H. W. Gresham, Jonesboro, N. C, Rt. 1 

Ray Greene Buie's Creek 



36 



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Minutes of tke 

Little River Baptist 
Association 

North Carolina 

71st Annual Session 



HELD WITH 



COATS BAPTIST CHURCH 

COATS, NORTH CAROLINA 

October 29, 1946 



The next annual session will be held Tuesday, Oct. 28, 
1947, with the First Baptist Church, Dunn, N. C. 



Minutes of the 

Little River Baptist 
Association 

NortK Carolina 

71st Annual Session 



HELD WITH 



COATS BAPTIST CHURCH 

COATS, NORTH CAROLINA 

October 29, 1946 



The next annual session will be held Tuesday, Oct. 28, 
1947, with the First Baptist Church, Dunn, N. C. 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 

A.SSOCIATIONAL DIRECTORY 3 

CONSTITUTION' _ : „. _ 8 

HISTORICAL TABLE 39 

LIST OF MESSENGERS .._. ._ 5 

OUR BELOVED DEAD 28 

PROCEEDINGS BEGIN 10 

EEPORTS— 

American Bible Society 21 

Associatio.ri Missionary 10 

Baptist Hospital 19 

B. T. U - 24 

Christian Education 26 

Christian Literature 11 

Evangelism 13 

Executive Committee 17 

Missions 15 

Relief and Annuity Board 22 

Sunday Schools 22 

Treasurer's Statement 23 

Womens Missonary Union 12 

,SPECIAL INFORMATION 29 

STATISTICAL TABLES BEGIN 31 



ASSOCIATIONAL DIRECTORY 



OFFICERS OF THE ASSOCiAHON 

Moderator: Dr. Leslie H. Campbell Buie's Creek 

Vice-Moderator: Rev. Sam Hudson ^ LiHington 

Clerk-Treasurer: Rev. H. D. Wood, Jr. Angier 

EXECUTIVE BOARD MEMBERS 

Leslie H. Campbell, Moderator Buie's Creek 

Sam F. Hudson, Vice-Moderator Lillington. 

Harry D. Wood, Jr., Clerk-Treasurer ABgier 

G. G. Page, S. S. Superintendent Buie's Creek 

George H. Williams, Training Union Director Dunn 

Mrs. D. B. Andrews, W. M. U. Supt. Fuquay Springs 

G. Scott Turner, Supt. of Evangelism Chalybeate SpTings 

Miss Zula Rogers, Associational Missionary Lillington 

Hervey Austin Fuquay Springs 

Dr. C. D. Bain Dunn 

J. G. Layton Lillington 

Raymond E. Moore ^-_ Mamers 

ASSOCIATIONAL MISSIONARY 
Miss Zula Rogers Liriington 

ASSOCIATIONAL OFFICERS OF WOMAN'S 
MISSIONARY UNION 

Supt. — Mrs. D. B. Andrews RFD 2, Fuquay Spriwgf 

Asso. Supt. — Mrs. R. L. Young Afigiet 

Sec.-Treas. — Mrs. H. H. Hamilton LillingtOB 

Young People's Leader — Mrs. S. Lewis Morgan, Jr. Dumij 

Asso. Y. P. L. — Mrs. R. L. Young A'ngier 

Literature Chairman — Mrs. Joel G. Layton LilH-ngtomi 

Mission Study Chairman — Mrs. Harry D. Wood, Jr.- __ Angier 

Com. Missions Chmn. — Mrs. C. R. Ammons LillingtaB 

Stewardship Chm. — Miss Lillian Draughon Buie's Greek 

Margaret Fund Chm. — Miss Mattie Bain Goa'fe 

White Cross Chm. — Mrs. Wilton Byrd Bunnlevd 

R. A. Counselor — Rev. S. Lewis Morgan, Jr., DusB 

Chmn. Nominating Comm. — Mrs. Chas. Howard __ Buie's Creek 



4 1946 ASSOCIATION AL MINUTES 

ASSOCIATIONAL OFFICERS OF SUNDAY SCHOOL 
ORGANIZATION 

Gen. Supt.— G. G. Page Buie's Creek 

Secretary — Miss Myrtice McPhail Buie's Creek 

Supt. of Evangelism — G. Scott Turner Chalybeate Springs 

Supt of Training — Raymond E. Moore Mamers 

Vacation Bible Schools — Ervin Stevens Rt 3, Lillington 

Extension — Mrs. L. J. Turlington Buie's Creek 

Adult — Mr. L. Jackson Erwin 

Young People — Mrs. Charles Howard Buie's Creek 

Intermediate — Mrs. R. A. Duncan Dunn 

Junior— Mrs. I. K. Stafford Buie's Creek 

Primary — Miss Mamie Haighwood Lillington 

Beginners — Mrs. H. H. Hamilton Lillington 

Cradle Roll— Mrs. C. L. Guy Dunn 

Group Leaders: 

• Western Leary Knight 

Northern Paul Bradley 

Southern H. H. Hamilton 

Central Dr. C. D. Bain 

ASSOCIATIONAL OFFICERS OF BAPTIST 
TRAINING UNION 

Pastor-Advisor — Rev. A. C. McCall Bunnlevel 

Director — George H. Williams Dunn 

Assoc. Director — T. A. Powell Lillington 

Secretary — Miss Katherine Taylor Dunn 

Pianist— Mrs. D. C. Woodall Erwin 

Chorister — Mrs. Carl Byrd Erwin 

Group Leaders: 

Western — Miss Erma Knight Broadway 

• Northern — O. R. Arnold 

Southern — Herbert Wood Bunnlevel 

Central — Bennie Slaughter Dunn 

Story Hour Leader — Miss Addie Prevatte Buie's Creek 

Junior Leader — Miss Bessie McNeill Broadway 

Intermediate Leader — Mrs. Lemon Powell Rt. 3, Lillington 

Young People's Leader — Miss Jo Hughes -^-— Dunn 

Adult Leader — Miss Lillian Draughon Dunn 



LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 5 

BROTHERHOOD REPRESENTATIVES 

None 

STANDING COMMITTEES 

None 

MAIN OFFICERS OF BAPTIST INSTITUTIONS FOUND 
WITHIN THIS ASSOCIATION 

L. H. Campbell, President, Campbell College, Buie's Creek 

Mrs. J. G. Layton, Member Board of Trustees, Campbell Col- 
lege, Lillington 

B. F. McLeod, President, Board of Trustees, Campbell College, 
Buie's Creek 

S. L. Morgan, Jr., Member General Board of the Baptist State 
Convention, Dunn 

D. H. Senter, Member Board of Trustees, Campbell College, 
Chalybeate Springs 

SPECIAI. OFFICERS 

Chm. on Christian Literature __ Mrs. Harvey O'Quinn, Mamers 

Chm. on Orphanage Rev. Forest Maxwell, Erwin 

Chm. on Missions Rev. R. E. Moore, Mamers 

Chm. on Temperance M. M. Jernigan, Dunn 

Chm. on Baptist Hospital Mrs. Wilton Byrd, Bunnlevel 

Chm. on Ministers' Annuities Rev. Sam F. Hudson, Lillington 

Chm. on Christian Education J. A. McLeod, Dunn 

ASSOCIATIONAL PRESBYTERY 

Rev. S. Lewis Morgan, Jr. Dunn 

Mr. B. F. McLeod Buie's Creek 

Rev. A. C. McCall Bunnlevel 

Rev. A. Paul Bagby Buie's Creek 

LIST OF MESSENGERS FROM THE CHURCHES 

While the general attendance was considerably larger than 
the list of names that follows, these are those recognized as of- 
ficial messengers from the several churches. 

ANTIOCH— Mrs. W. E. Page, Mr. Lee O'Quinn, Mr. Henry Pat- 
terson, Mr. Z. J. Womack, Mr. J. C. Bullock 

ANGIER— Mr. C. W. Flowers, Mr. J. B. Flowers, Mr. W. M. 
Morgan, Mrs. L. E. Johnson, Mrs. W. M, Morgan 



6 1946 ASSOCIATIONAL MINUTES 

BAPTIST CHAPEL— Mr. Malcom Dickens, Mr. Sidney Womack, 
Mrs. Sidney Womack, Mr. Perry Dickens, Mrs. Rena 
Thomas 

BAPTIST GROVE— Mr. H. M. Johnson, Mrs. H. M. Johnson, 
Mr. J. H. Roger, Mr. H. B. Lynch, Mrs. J. H. Roger 

BETHEL— Mr. Luther Glover, Mr. Leland Matthews, Mr. Wil- 
liam West, Mrs. William West, Mr. David Matthews 

BROADWAY— Mr. Owen Taylor, Mr. W. M. Thomas, Mr. 1. C. 
Pittman, Mr. G. I. Stone, Mrs. Pearl Campbell 

BUIES CREEK— Mr. E. A. Howard, Mr. T. T. Lanier, Mr. G. G. 
Page, Mrs. T. T. Lanier, Mr. L. H. Campbell 

CHALYBEATE SPRINGS— Mr. E. W. Smith, Mr. Walter Mc- 
Donald, Mrs. D. B. Andrews, Mrs. Mirandy Matthews 

COATS— Mr. Owen Odum, Mr. W. E. Nichols, Mr. Alton Grimes, 
Mr. Newton Byrd, Mrs. T. D. Stewart 

CUMBERLAND UNION— Mrs. Ralph Clark, Mrs. Ralph Clark, 
Mr. Roy Sears, Mrs. Roy Sears, Mr. John Sears 

DUNN FIRST— Mrs. Henry Whittendon, Miss Lillian Draughon, 
Mr. H. P. Strickland, Mrs. Arthur Duncan, Mr. George Wil- 
liams 

DUNN, SECOND— Mrs. J. B. Creech, Mrs. R. B. Wright, Mrs. 
Moody Strickland, Mr. M. B. Faircloth 

ERWIN, EAST— Mr. Herbert McLamb, Mr. W. C. Stone, Mr. 
Clarence Barefoot, Mrs. Clarence Barefoot, Mrs. Alice Col- 
lins 

ERWIN, FIRST— M. L. Jackson, Mrs. L. Jackson, Mrs. L. E. 
Stancil, Mr. J. H. McKee 

FRIENDSHIP— Mrs. Carl Gregory, Mrs. Charlie Strickland, 
Mr. F. M. Allen, Mr. Wm. Massengill, Mrs. T. E. Trulove. 

HARMONY— Mr. G. R. Souders, Mr. A. M. Thomas, Mrs. E. B. 
Latta 

HOLLY SPRINGS— Mr. Paul Patterson, Mr. W. J. W^ilson, Mr. 
R. V. Neill, Mr. Oscar Knight, Mr. Landus Baker 

KENNEBEC— Mrs. O. D. Lyon, Mrs. Avery Moore, Rev. R. 
E. Atkins, Mr. C. J. Howard, Mr. M. S. Olive 

LAYTON'S CHAPEL— Mr. Earl Hair, Miss Gladys Lucas, Mrs. 
B. E. Lucas, Mrs. E. H. Godfrey, Mrs. Clara C. Sherron. 

LILLINGTON— Mrs. Joel Layton, Mrs. A. G. Rickman, Mrs. 
N. W. Maness 



LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 7 

MACEDONIA—Mr. Roy Weathers, Mr. J. C. Smith, Mr. Sher- 
wood Truelove, Miss Lena Weathers, Miss Edna Denson 

NEILLS CREEK— Mrs. Berles Johnson, Mr. Allen Matthews, 
Mr. C. B. Matthews 

OAK GROVE— Mrs. G. C. Denton, Mrs. Lena Betts, Mr. Hu- 
bert Matthews, Mrs. Hubert Matthews, Miss Frances Pate 

PLEASANT MEMORY— Mrs. Talton Penny, Mr. Russell Wil- 
liams, Mrs. Russell Williams, Mrs. S. W. Turlington, Mr. 
S. W. Turlington 

PINEY GROVE— 

RAWLS— Mr. R. F. James, Mrs. R. F. James, Mrs. O. D. Sher- 
man, Miss Beatrice Rawls, Rev. T. H. Williams 

SWANN'S STATION— Mr. H. W. Graham, Mr. E. C. Womack, 
Mr. Robert Godfrey, Mr. A. T. Batchelor, Mrs. H. W. 
Graham 



CONSTITUTION 

1. This association shall be known as "The Little River Bap- 
tist Association." 

2. The object of this association shall be the advancement 
of the Kingdom of Christ, and the means of accomplishing this 
shall be strict conformity with the priniciples of the New Testa- 
ment. 

3. The association shall have no authority over the internal 
right of any church belonging to it and shall act only as an advis- 
ory council. 

4. The association shall be composed of messengers chosen 
by the churches connected with it, each church being entitled to 
five delegates. Ordained ministers having oversight of churches 
in the association, or having their membership in these churches, 
shall also be received as messengers. 

5. A quorum shall consist of messengers from a majority of 
the churches of the association. 

6. The delegates from each church to the annual meeting of 
the association shall bear a letter certifying their appointment and 
giving an account of the condition of the church and a statement 
of all funds contributed for local and benevolent purposes. 

7. The officers of the association shall be a moderator, a 
vice-moderator, a clerk and a treasurer, who shall be chosen annu- 
ally from the members composing the association, and shall con- 
tinue in office until their successors are elected. The term of 
office of the moderator shall begin at the conclusion of the session 
at which he is elected and continue until the close of the next 
annual meeting. 

8. It shall be the duty of the moderator to preside during the 
deliberations of the body, to enforce the observance of the consti- 
tution, preserve the decorum, appoint committees except when 
other provisions are made for their appointment, decide all 
questions of order, giving his opinion on any question under dis- 
cussion, and cast the deciding vote in cast of a tie. 

9. It shall be the duty of the clerk to record the proceedings 
of each annual meeting of the association, superintend the print- 
ing of the minutes and their distribution among the churches. 

10. It shall be the duty of the treasurer to receive all funds 
sent by the churches or collected during the sessions of this body 
and to disburse the same for the objects stated. He shall present 
a report on all funds administered by him at each annual meeting. 

11. The association shall appoint, annually, a Promotion 
Committee composed of one member from each church in the asso- 
ciation and the pastors of the churches. The moderator shall be 
chairman of this committee. The function of this committee shall 



LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 9 

be the promotion of Associational plans through the several 
churches. 

12. The association shall appoint annually an Executive Com- 
mittee of 12 members, among whom by virtue of their office are 
to be the moderator, vice-moderator, clerk-treasurer, S. S. Supt. 
of the Association, Training Union Director, W. M. U. Superintend- 
ent, Supt. of Evangelism, the Associational Missionary. This com- 
mittee shall have general supervision of the affairs of the asso- 
ciation during the interval between the meetings of the body; shall 
seek to promote the welfare of the churches, and their active par- 
ticipation in the causes fostered by the denomination; but shall 
be answerable to the association for its acts, and make an annual 
report to the association of its work. 

13. The association in annual meeting shall appoint a pres- 
bytery of four members to sit with the pastor of any person whose 
ordination is sought, and the moderator of the association, to 
examine the qualifications and opportunities for work of the can- 
didate. 

14. The association shall hold an annual meeting commencing 
on Tuesday after the fourth Sunday in October. 

15. A meeting of the association may be called by the modera- 
tor at any time by the consent of five members of the Executive 
committee. Each church shall be notified of such a meeting in 
time to send delegates. 

16. This association shall have the right to exclude from its 
membership any church that departs from New Testament principles. 

17. An church desiring to become a member of this associa- 
ciation may present a petition at the annual meeting of the body 
through delegates appointed for this purpose. If the association 
shall consent to receive such church the moderator shall extend 
the hand of fellowship to the delegates. 

18. The association may invite visitors to seats and extend to 
them all the privileges of delegates except that of voting.' 

19. By appointment, at each annual meeting, an introductory 
sermon, and a sermon or address on missions shall be delivered. 

20. This constitution may be amended at any annual session, 
by a vote of two-thirds of the delegates present, provided that 
notice shall be given before the day that such motion will be pre- 
sented. 



PROCEEDINGS 

Seventy-First Annual Session of tKe 
Little River Baptist Association 

1. The Session was called to order in the Coats Baptist 
Church, Coats, N. C, at 10:00 A. M. by Professor L. H. Camp- 
bell, Moderator. The congregation sang the hymn "The 
Church's One Foundation" accompanied by Mrs. C. G. Fuquay, 
Pianist. The congregation then read respectively Psalm 90. 
Rev. W. M. Page, pastor of the Fuquay Springs Baptist Church, 
led in prayer. 

2. The clerk called the roll of churches and found all 
represented except Broadway. 

3. A motion by Rev. G. Scott Turner that these delegates 
constitute the 71st Annual Session of the Little River Baptist 
Association passed. 

4. A suggested program was presented by Moderator 
Campbell. Rev. S. L. Morgan moved that the annual sermon 
be preached at 12:15 P. M. to allow Rev. Forest Maxwell to at- 
tend a funeral in his community. Motion passed. The sug- 
gested program was adopted by common consent. 

5. Mrs. H. D. Wood, Jr., was recognized to conduct the 
memorial service. All those who have passed on to the Lord's 
reward are listed on a special page in the back of these 
minutes. Mrs. L. E. Johnson read the list while Mrs. Wood 
played various hymns on the piano. Mrs. Johnson led in prayer. 

6. Moderator Campbell recognized Miss Zula Rogers, 
Association Missonary, for her report, illustrated by posters, 
as follows: 

REPORT OF ASSOCIATION MISSIONARY 

It is impossible to make a complete report of the work done 
in our association this year; therefore I will only list a few things 
that may not be included in the reports of our department heads. 

1. Churches reached in Schools of Missions 24 

2. Number of Missionaries used 18 

3. Number talks made by the Missionaries 136; Conversions 
5; No. lives dedicated to Christian Service 5; subscriptions to the 
Commission 26 — to Home Missions 5. 

4. Vacation Bible Schools in churches 27; in Missions 4. 



LITTLE RIBER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 11 

Little River has the distinction of being the only association in 
the Southern Baptist Convention that has reached each of its 
churches with a Bible School for a period of seven years. 

During February each of the churches was visited with the 
purpose of magnifying the importance of the Sunday School. Work. 
Even though the enrollment for the year has decreased, we feel 
that the work done in February is largely responsible for the in- 
crease of 379 in S. S. attendance. 

During October 420 from 26 churches were reached in the four 
group training schools with an average attendance of 233. 

B. T. U. 

Four Training Unions have been reorganized during the year — 
Erwin, First, Dunn 2nd, Harmony and Holly Springs. 

Little River had winners in three of the fine state contests. The 
names of the winners follow: 

Memory Work Junior Antioch Church: Ernestine O'Quinn, Joyce 
Brown, Elizabeth Patterson, Betty Lou Thomas, Shirley Jean Mc- 
Leod. Leader, Mrs. Carl O'Quinn. 

Sword Drill Int. Antoch Church: Margie Stewart; Margaret Mc- 
Lean, director: Barbara Adcock, Joyce Campbell, Norma Bruce Dick- 
ey, Emily Frances Altman, Betty Lou Gladston, Ruth Thames, Su- 
san Thames, Patricia Johnson, Effie Lou McLean. Leader, Mrs. 
Lemon Powell. 

8. Delegates were recognized from Broadway Church, 
which made all churches in the association represented in the 
service. 

9. Vice-Moderator Sam Hudson took the chair and recog- 
nized Brother L. H. Campbell for the Moderator's report. 

10. The Modertor's report was given verbally and could 
not be reproduced for publication. 

IL The suggestions contained in the report were referred 
to the Executive Committee. 

12. Mrs. J. G. Layton was recognized to report on Publi- 
cations. Her report follows: 

REPORT ON CHRISTIAN LITERATURE 
Of immeasureable value in informing, training and enlisting 
our people in the whole program of the church, are a galaxy of 
publications, — the Biblical Recorder, Charity and Children, products 
of North Carolina "brain and brawn;" the Southern Baptist Home 
Missions magazine; The Commission, published by the Foreign Mis- 
sion Board. 

The Biblical Recorder, substantial organ of the Baptist State 
Convention, is a wholesome, attractive and interesting weekly. It 
is a refreshing comrade and stimulating helper for every member 



12 1946 ASSOCIATIONAL MINUTES 

of the family. Infallible proof of its merits is the increasing list of 
paid subscribers. The present circulation is approximately 38,000, 
— a net gain for the past 12 months of approximately 5,000 sub- 
scribers. 

Recorder clubs in Little River Association are as follows: 



Church 


Subs 


Friendship 


21 


Antioch 


36 


Harmony 


6 


Baptist Grove 


7 


Holly prings 


12 


Broadway 


12 


Kennebec 


7 


Chalybeate Springs 


18 


Lillington 


49 


Dunn, First 


87 


Neill's Creek 


16 


Erwin 


12 


Oak Grove 


5 






Swann's Station 


8 


Every Resident Member Club: 






Church 


Subs 


Dunn, Second 


•8 


Angier 


147 


Buie's Creek 


139 






Coats 


74 



Charity and Children is the newsy weekly letter from our fos- 
ter children at the Orphanage. 

The publication is ably edited: the editor's wise and thought- 
provoking comments on current events have frequently attracted the 
attention of secular daily papers. 

Home Missions magazine and The Commission are filled with 
information that challenges deeper interest in mission work at home 
and abroad. 

These four publications are supplementary and complementary 
and should be read by every Baptist. 

Therefore, it is recommended that this Association appoint or 
elect a Christian Literature representative who will be interested 
in getting club or budget subscriptions to Biblical Recorder. Char- 
ity and Children, Home Missions and The Commission, in every 
church. 

Respectfully submitted, 
Maude C. Layton 

14. The report was adopted and the recommendations re- 
ferred to the Executive Committee. 

15. Brother Larkins was recognized to speak for the Bib- 
lical Recorder and other phases of the production and use of 
Christian Literature. 

16. Mrs. D. B. Andrews was recognized for a report on 
the work of the W. M. U. The report follows: 

REPORT OF THE WOMENS MISSIONARY UNION 

Since the day when the woman brought to Jesus the alabaster 
box of precious ointment, women have sought some way to express 



LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 13 

to Him their gratitude and devction. Women's Missionary Union is 
the channel through which we may bring to our Lord our best 
gifts. 

We are happy to report that last year our W. M. U. reached 
all twelve points on the Standard for Associations, thereby becom- 
ing A-1. The Little River was one of the three associations in the 
State to reach this attainment. 

Last year we reported only sixteen churches having Mission- 
ary organizations. This year we have six new societies. These are 
in the following churches: Kenebec, Pleasant Memory, Dunn, Sec- 
ond, Macedonia, and reorganized Baptist Grove. We also have nine 
new Young People's organizations. May I ask that all pastors, Sun- 
day School Superintendents and church officers lend your support 
and prayers to these new organizations? 

Interest in Mission Study has been most encouraging. We re- 
port 1288 women enrolled in these classes. We have had under 
the direction of Mrs. Harry Wood, our Mission Study Chairman, 
four Associational Mission Study Classes with more than 100 wom- 
en attending each class. 

Most of our societies under the leadership of efficient commun- 
ity missions chairmen, ministers to the needs within our own asso- 
ciation. 

Our financial goal for 1946 is $5,505.21. During the first three 
quarters approximately 3-4 of this amount has been given. 

Four executive meetings have been held. Our leadership con- 
ference was held last Jan. in Dunn, First, and our annual meeting 
was held last April in the lovely Neil's Creek Church, now a happy 
memory. Both were well attended and abundantly provided food 
and every comfort by the hostess societies. 

Under the direction of Mr. and Mrs. S. L. Morgan, our Young 
People's Leaders, one day camps were held for our boys and girls 
in September in the First Church in Erwin. 

For the faithfulness of those women who have labored in the 
quiet plans in our association to make this report possible, to those 
who have brought to Him their best gifts. I am humbly grateful. 
To Him who has entrusted to us this portion of the Kingdom's work, 
I give all the praise. Our Watchword for the year is, "Look unto me 
and be ye saved, all ye ends of the earth, for I am God, and there 
is none else." Isaiah 45: 22. 

Respectfully submitted, 
Mrs. D. B. Andrews 

18. Rev. G. Scott Turner was recognized to give his re- 
port on Evangelism. The report follows: 

REPORT ON EVANGELISM 

Evangelism is one of, if not the, most important duties of the 



14 1946 ASSOCIATION AL MINUTES 

churches, and is therefore worthy of the most earnest consideration 
of this body. This report deals with evangelism within the bounds 
of our own association. 

Our greatest evangelistic efforts are made in "Revival" services. 
Nineteen of our churches held one such meeting during the associa- 
tional year, five churches held two meetings, the remaining four 
churches have either held a meeting since the year closed or expect 
to do so in the immediate future. 

There have been 216 additions to our churches by baptism. This 
is almost one third less than the number reported last year, which 
was 364, and indicates that the enthusiasm engendered by the Cen- 
tennial campaign is dwindling away. Three churches report no ad- 
ditions by baptism. Our Sunday schools present a great evangelistic 
opportunity and most of our qonverts were attendants. The Daily 
Vacation Bible Schools also afford a great opportunity for evangelism. 
The winning of the lost to Christ should be a matter of deep concern 
to our Sunday school forces and books on this great art should be 
used in our study courses. 

There are few converts in the regular services of most of our 
churches. In the early days of Christianity the Lord added daily to 
the churches such as were being saved. It seems to your committee 
that our failure here should be a matter of earnest heart-searching. 

Two groups are carrying on open air services in the Association. 
Brother Harry Wood, pastor of the church at Angler, does work of 
this type and uses loud speakers and other equipment to make the 
work effective. A group of ministerial students from Campbell Col- 
lege is also engaged in similar services. The following difficulties 
have been encountered: 

1. The general indifference of the mass of church people to 
this type of work. 

2. The lack of effective music, both vocal and instrumental. 

3. The need of a careful survey to determine where and when 
such services can reach the most people. 

The managem.ent of the new radio station, to be located at 
Dunn, seems to be anxious to give the ministers of the county oppor- 
tunity to make use of their facilities. This presents another great 
field for evangelistic effort. Of course all denominations will be 
given equal opportunity. We should endeavor to see that when Bap- 
tists are in charge we are represented by our ablest speakers and 
programs of a high type are broadcasted. 

Your committee offers the following recommendations: 

1. That we urge the importance of winning the lost to Christ 
upon all our brotherhood and especially upon pastors and Sunday 
school workers. 

2. That we pray for, work for and expect conversions in all our 
public services. 



LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 15 

3. That a committee be appointed to encourage and assist in 
open-air services. 

4. That a committee be appointed to assist in making radio 
services as helpful as possible. 

Respectfully submitted, 

G. Scott Turner, committee. 

20. Rev. S. Lewis Morgan was recognized to give his re- 
port on Missions at Home and Abroad. The report follows: 

REPORT ON MISSIONS AT HOME AND ABROAD 

More than ever before the peoples of the earth are looking to 
the Christian faith, not only for salvation, but for the only success- 
ful way of life for a distressed, divided world. We as "Missionary'' 
Baptists know that they are seeing truly. If we as Christians have 
in our possession such a blessing for the world, we must share it as 
speedily as possible with as many people as possible. Evangelism is 
our desire in action at home. Missions is our desire in action where 
we ourselves cannot be. Our Home and Foreign Mission Boards are 
our agents to carry out this desire. 

During 1946 our offerings through the Co-operative Program 
have been continuing to grow larger. The special World Relief and 
Rehabilitation Offering just completed showed slightly more than 
our $3,500,0000 goal, but North Carolina has as yet failed to reach 
her $400,000 part. Some of the churches of our association will even 
yet want to have a larger part in this special offering. 

For 1947, the Miami Convention set a goal of $10,000,000 for the 
Co-operative Program. The first $5,000,000 will be apportioned for 
operating expenses as follows: 

I Foreign Missions 46% 

Home Missions 18% 

Southern Baptist Theological Seminary 5% 

Southwestern Baptist Theological Seminary 5% 

Baptist Bible Institute 5% 

W. M. U. Training School 1% 

American Baptist Theological Seminary 2% 

Relief and Annuity Board 15% 

Radio Committee 1 9-10% 

Baptist Brotherhood 1% 

Southern Baptist Hospital 1-10% 

Money above $5,000,000 will be apportioned to the various 
boards and seminaries for capital needs, such as the erection of 
new buildings. 

Let us in our churches make every effort to increase our gifts 
through the Co-operative Program, that we may reach these worthy 
goals and speed forward the evangelization of the world and hasten 
the coming of Christ's Kingdom. 



16 1946 ASSOCIATION AL MINUTES 

We would especially urge that the call of the Mission Fields be 
laid on the hearts of our young people, that they may hear person- 
ally the Great Commission of our Lord. Moreover, through the power 
of prayer may we daily make supplication for our great leaders and 
our faithful missionaries, that their sowing may bring forth fruit a 
hundred-fold. 

Respectfully submitted, 

S. Lewis Morgan, Jr. 

22. Dr. E. L. Spivey, State Mission Board representative, 
spoke on the need for a world vision of brotherhood and Chris- 
tian loyalty. 

23. The three preceding reports were adopted as given 
and their recommendations referred to the Executive Commit- 
tee. 

24. Miss Jessie Turner, of Coats, sang "The Stranger of 
Galilee" accompanied by Mrs. C. G. Fuquay. 

25. The Moderator appointed the following committees: 
Resolutions: C. E. Ruffin, Early Smith, Mrs. Talmon Penny 
Time, Place and Preacher: Joe M. Long, T. H. Williams, 

James B. Flowers 

Nominations: S. Lewis Morgan, Mrs. D. B. Andrews, Ray- 
mond Moore, Zula Rogers, G. G. Page. 

26. Rev. Forest Maxwell, Pastor of the First Baptist 
Church, Erwin, was recognized and read Luke 4:14, after 
which he preached the Annual Sermon, using as his theme "Not 
by Bread Alone." 

27. Rev. Joe Mack Long invited the congregation to din- 
ner and said that Pleasant Memory and Oak Grove Churches 
cooperated in preparing and serving the dinner. 

28. The benediction after the sermon closed the morning 
service. 

Afternoon Session 

29. The afternoon session was called to order by Mode- 
rator Campbell. The congregation sang "Stand Up, Stand Up 
for Jesus." 

30. The Moderator presented for examination copies of 
the minutes of the Raleigh Baptist Association for the years 
1827, 1828, and 1830. These minutes are the property of Mr. 
Hugh Green, Lillington, Rt. 1, N. C. 

31. Brother W. C. Reid of Kennedy Home was recognized 
to present the work of our orphanage. 



LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 17 

32. Rev. Joe Mack Long gave the report of the Committee 
on Time, Place and Preacher as follows: 

Time: Oct. 28, 1947, Tuesday 

Place: First Baptist Church, Dunn 

Preacher: Rev. O. W. Pully, alternate Dr. A. Paul Bagby. 

33. Rev. Sam Hudson was recognized for the report of 
the Executive Committee as follows: 

REPORT OF EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

The Executive Committee recommends: 

1 — That a small but representative committee be appointed to 
act in an advisory capacity in forming fields of churches, and to lo- 
cate pastors convenient to these fields, and to generally assist 
churches secure pastors. 

2 — That the churches make a serious effort to improve their 
music. 

We are particularly fortunate to have capable leadership at 
Campbell College, and would like for some practical arrangements 
to be made whereby church leaders might be trained in musical 
leadership for the local churches. 

3 — That the churches, through budgetary arrangements, send 
the Biblical Recorder into every home in which they have members. 
We commend all our denominational periodicals, and hope our peo- 
ple will subscribe to them, and read them. 

4 — That the Association adopt a Budget of $2200.00 for the sup- 
port of our Associational Missionary Program, and ask each church 
to give 3% of all offerings to the Associational Clerk-Treasurer for 
the purpose. The gifts for Building and repairs may not be counted in 
arriving at the 3%. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Sam Hudson, Chairman. 

35. Dr. A. Paul Bagby moved that there be added to this. 
report a memorial to the State Convention to memoralize the 
Southern Baptist Convention for a genuine, worthy Baptist 
Hymnal. Motion passed. 

36. Rev. G. Scott Turner spoke explaining the 3 per cent 
asked for the support of Association missions. 

38. Rev. C. E. Ruffin was recognized for a report of the 
Committee on Resolutions. The report was adopted as follows: 
REPORT ON RESOLUTIONS 

Your Committee on Resolutions, on behalf of the membership 
of Little River Baptist Association express our sincere thanks to the 
Coats, Pleasant Memory, and Oak Grove Baptist Churches for the 



18 1946 ASSOCIATIONAL MINUTES 

delightful reception given us, and for their untiring efforts in mak- 
ing this meeting a success. 

Be it further resolved, that we express our appreciation to our 
visiting brethren for their inspiring and instructive messages. 

Be it further resolved that we express our appreciation to Miss 
Zula Rogers ,our Associational Missionary, for her talented leadership 
and untiring efforts, and pledge to her our uniter support in the 
coming associational year. 

Be it further resolved we, the messengers to the Little River 
Baptist Association, pledge ourselves to endeavor to "lengthen the 
Cords and strengthen the States," in Our Lord's work, and hereby 
resolve to try and encourage a more united effort and sincere prayer 
life on the part of our Baptist membership in the Little River Asso- 
ciation. 

Be it also resolved that we feel a sense of shame at the losses 
sustained in the various departments of our work during the past 
year. However, we are not willing to accept the spirit of defeatism; 
rather, believing as we do in the ultimate victory of Our Lord, we 
urge a more consecrated life on behalf of all the Baptists of the 
Little River Association that His will may be done on earth as it is 
in Heaven. 

Respectfully submitted, 
C. E. Ruffin 
Mrs. T. H. Penny 
E. W. Smith. 

40. Rev. S. Lewis Morgan, Jr., was recognized to present 
the following nominations. Officers were elected for the work 
of the Association. The names will be found listed in the front 
of these minutes. 

1 . Officers of the Association 

2. Excutive Committee of the Association 

3. Officers of the W. M. S. 

4. Officers of the Sunday School 

5. Officers of the B. T. U. 

6. Associational Presbytery 

7. Special Officers 

41. The Moderator recognized the following new pastors 
in the association: 

Dr. A. Paul Bagby, Buie's Creek 

Rev. Joe Mack Long, Coats 

Rev. Julius Holloway, Pleasant Memory 

Rev. Raymond Moore, Antioch 

Rev. J. L. Atkins, Piney Grove 



LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 19 

42. Dr. Owen F. Herring, representing Wake Forest Col- 
lege, was recognized to speak on the subject of Christian 
Education. 

43. Moderator Campbell turned the chair over to Vice- 
Moderator Sam Hudson. 

44. Mrs. Wilton Byrd was recognized for the report of 
the Baptist Hospital which was adopted as follows: 

REPORT OF BAPTIST HOSPITAL 

Our Baptist Hospital has had another full and fruitful year. In 
the past few years its facilities to care for the sick have been greatly 
increased. This is true for both those who do not have the money to 
pay for complete hospital care and those who have complicated af- 
flictions which the hospitals and doctors in most communities are 
not prepared to care for. 

The Out-Patient Clinic is now working in its enlarged and bet- 
er equipped quarters. It is prepared to do the highest type of work 
of examining the sick, prescribing treatment for their ills, and giving 
some specialized treatments. After the examination, most of these 
can be treated back home by a local doctor or in a local hospital. 
There is now being added to the clinic additional service in psychia- 
try and in eye and dental diseases. The cost for an examination in 
the Out-Patient Clinic is $5.00, not including X-rays and special 
laboratory tests, for all who are able to pay it. This just about covers 
the actual cost to the hospital for the examination. The charges for 
the X-ray pictures and special tests are estimated at actual cost. 
Most people are able to pay these fees. In cases where they are not 
able to pay the whole fee, the balance is paid out of the Mother's 
Day Offering. 

Along with the Out-Patient Clinic, there is operated the Private 
Clinic for those who are able to pay the regular standard fees for 
medical care. 

The sick who come to these clinics and need to enter the Baptist 
'Hospital for treatment are then admitted as bed patients, insofar as 
room permits. Due to lack of space, it is impossible for the hospital 
to take care of all who need to be admitted. Because of this lack 
of space, our hospital has available a great deal of the finest medical 
skill w^hich it is not able to use to relieve suffering. 

The Mother's Day Offering enables our hospital to care for 
those who do not have the money to pay their full bills. Those who 
are able to pay in full are expected to do so, because, if they fail to, 
it will take help from those who are in actual need. No person who is 
examined on the Out-Patient Clinic and no service patient who is ad- 
mitted to the hospital is charged any doctor's bill at all, whether or 
not he pays his hospital bill. More than half of those who are cared 



20 1946 ASSOCIATIONAL MINUTES 

for by our hospital are such service patients, and many of them 
are unable to pay anything at all. Our hospital does far more free 
service for the poor than any other denominational hospital in the 
South and stands among the first in America in the amount it does 
Last year this free service cost the hospital over $167,000. We are 
happy that the churches of our association had a large share through 
our Mother's Day Offering in this great service. 

Our Baptist Hospital operates one of the best schools of nursing 
in the South. It seeks the finest young women, mentally, physically, 
and spiritually, to train for a Christian ministry of healing. It invites 
young women from our Baptist homes and churches who are inter- 
ested in giving their lives to this important profession to consider 
going there for their training. The need for nurses is urgent. Any 
girl 18 years of age or over, with high school education ^ or better, is 
eligible to apply. She should write the Director, Nursing Department, 
North Carolina Baptist Hospital, Winston Salem, North Carolna. 

The new Department of ' Religion at our Baptist Hospital is 
being organized to render an effective spiritual ministry. This in- 
cludes visitation and counsel among the sick and burdened in the 
hospital, Bible instruction and a religious program for students, the 
effort to help create a Christian spirit through all the work of the 
hospital, and carrying to our churches the information concerning 
the work of our hospital. The ministry of this department is recog- 
nized by all connected with the hospital as an important part of the 
work. 

The urgent and outstanding need of our Baptist Hospital is the 
construction of a new south wing. This would provide 140 new beds, 
which we so greatly need, especially to care for the more seriously 
ill who need private rooms. Additional operating and delivery rooms 
and X-ray facilities would be included. It would provide adequate 
kitchen and storage room, where the hospital is now seriously handi- 
capped for lack of space. Also, it would provide room for a laimdry. 
It now costs the hospital over $50,000 a year to get its laundry done 
outside. The new wing would greatly increase the service of our 
hospital to the sick and would enable it to increase its income. 

The cost of the new south wing would be close to a million dol- 
lars. One gift of $200,000 already has been offered toward this, pro- 
vided the construction is approved this year. Many who have been to 
our hospital as as patients, or to take patients, know how badly this 
additional room is needed. The advisability of permitting the hos- 
pital to construct this building will be considered by our Baptist 
State Convention in its sessions at AsheviUe in November. Hie 
messengers from our association to the State Convention will have 
opportunity to vote their approval of this new building. We hope 
they will act favorably toward it. 



LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 21 

46. Rev. W. R. Grigg, representative of the Baptist Hos- 
pital was recognized to speak concerning the work of our hos- 
pital. 

47. Rev. C. E. Ruffin was recognized to present the work 
of the American Bible Society. The report was adopted as fol- 
lows : 

REPORT OF THE AMERICAN BIBLE SOCIETY 
One of the great contributions made to the work of sending the 
Gospel to the utmost parts of the earth is the work of the American 
Bible Society, working in cooperation with the denominational boards 
in getting the Holy Scriptures into the hands of as many people as 
possible. Less than a century, now past, the printing of the Bible 
was amazingly expensive and its circulation limited. Thus, because 
of cost, and without any concrete organization for the distribution 
of the Holy Scriptures, millions were without the Bible, and were 
of necessity forced to rely upon priest and preacher for what knowl- 
edge they received from the Sacred Scriptures, "today, with the 
facilities at hand of modern printing machinery. Bibles, millions of 
them, come from the presses of our land annually. 

The American Bible Society, a non-profit organization, is tak- 
ing advantage of this opportunity. Its Society provides the Scriptures 
in many lands at less than the cost of production because the income 
level of those lands is so low they cannot afford more than a frac- 
tion of the part of the printing and binding. In cases of special need 
at home and abroad, the Scriptures are given without charge. The 
Herculean task of providing the Scriptures for our armed forces, 
war prisoners, and refugees by the Society merits the praise ©f 
every Bible loving Christian in our land. Baptists believe that the 
Scriptures "is of no private interpretation . . ."; that the New Testa- 
ment is an adequate criterion for our youth, and that the individual 
has a right to "search the Scriptures," and learn tjie truth for him- 
self, always giving a "Thus Saith the Lord," for his belief. Therefore, 
every Baptist should prayerfully support the work of this organiza- 
tion, that is endeavoring to send the Scriptures to the utmost parts 
of this earth. 

Resolutions have been adopted by the Southern Baptist Con- 
vention and its executive conunittee, and by State conventions com- 
mending the work of the American Bible Society and requesting the 
churches to contribute to its support. The Baptists of Little River 
Association, following the brethren in the S. B. C. and State con- 
vention also commend the work of the Society, and request the 
Churches to aid it in the work being done in sending the Scriptures 
to the world of mankind. 

Respectfully submitted, 
C. E. Ruffin. 



22 : 1946 ASSOCIATIONAL MINUTES 



49. The Vice-Moderator presented the work of the Relief 
and Annuity Board in the report adopted as follows: 

RELIEF AND ANNUITY BOARD REPORT 

The Relief and Annuity Board, with headquarters in Dallas, 
Texas, is the agency of Southern Baptists to take care of their old 
and disabled preachers and church workers. It has a department of 
relief that gives so much each month to old, wornout, and disabled 
ministers. The money used for relief is the gift of the denomination, 
and comes from the churches. 

Because relief gifts are not large enough to adequately care for 
the recipient, there is also a Department of Annuity. This department 
is so planned as to take care of all denominational workers ade- 
quately. It proposes that each pastor and denominational worker pay 
4% of his salary; the church add another 4%, and the Denomination 
add an amount, the total of which creates a fund for the care of the 
participant when old or disabled. 

Your Committee most strongly urges each pastor and each 
church to enter the annuity plan. It has been carefully worked out 
and prayerfully considered, and our wisest men think it better for 
both church and pastor. It is high tim.e that all pastors and all 
churches of the Association should enter it. 

Respectfully submitted, 
Sam F. Hudson. 

51. Brother G. G. Page was recognized to give the re- 
port on our Sunday Schools. The report was adopted as fol- 
lows : 

REPORT OF THE SUNDAY SCHOOLS 

The average attendance in our Sunday schools showed a splendid 
increase for the year. We had an average of 379 present each Sunday 
over the year before. That is an increase of 14 for each school for 
every Sunday in the year. Much of this increase is due to the return 
of our service personnel and some to increased effort on the part of 
our workers. 

We still lead in Vacation Bible Schools. Through the leadership 
of Miss Rogers and Mr. Ervin Stephens we conducted 31 Bible 
schools with an enrollment of 2352 and an average attendance of 
1918. This is a most commendable achievement. 

Our Sunday school forces are organized on the convention basis. 
The list of officers may be seen in the roster of "Officers of the As- 
sociation" in the front of the minutes. The following meetings were 
held last year; two general conferences for all officers and teachers 
of the association, two cabinet meetings for the associational offi- 
cers, one group meeting in each of the four groups and teams were 
sent into all the churches for work planning and fellowship. 



LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 23 

About one fourth of the churches had training classes. During 
October group study courses were conducted at four points. All the 
churches but two participated. Rev. Raymond Moore led in the 
work with the aid of Miss Rogers. 

Your Sunday School organization is looking to the future with 
hope and inspiration. Meetings and allied efforts are planned to fit 
into the general calendar of the association being arranged by our 
missionary, Miss Rogers. Let us hope and pray for your continued 
cooperation and counsel. 

Respectfully submitted, 
G. G. Page. 

54. Rev. Joe Mack Long again invited the association to 
supper. After the benediction by Rev. Raymond Moore the 
association adjourned for supper. 

Evening Session 

55. The evening session opened with the singing of 
^'Come, Thou Fount of Every Blessing." Brother Owen Odum 
led in prayer. 

56. The Treasurer, Harry D. Wood, Jr., presented the 
Treasurer's Statement which was adopted as follows: 

TREASURER'S STATEMENT 

Funds Received: 

BaL on hand 11-29-45 $264.44 

Angier 325.00 

Antioch 298.29 

Baptist Chapel 7.46 

Baptist Grove 43.82 

Bethel 10.75 

Broadway 10.00 

Buies Creek 221.00 

Chalybeate Springs 200.05 

Coats 126.32 

Cumberland Union 103.10 

Dunn, First 502.17 

Dunn, Second 9.00 

Erwin, East 30.00 

Erwin, First 155.00 

Friendship 32.50 

Harmony 5.00 

Holly Springs 57.50 

Kennebec 20.90 

Layton's Chapel 20.90 

Lillington 207.50 

Macedonia 62.94 



24 1946 ASSOCIATIONAL MINUTES 

Neills Creek 112.36 

Oak Grove 25.00 

Pleasant Memory 24.00 

Rawls 3.00 

Swanns Station 27.21 

Other income 35.85 

$2949.76 
Disbursements: 

Miss Zula Rogers, Salary $1800.00 

Expense 300.00 

$2100.00 $2100.00 

School of Missions, expenses 195.52 

World Relief 233.02 

428.54 428.54 

Theo. B. Davis Sons, printing minutes 120.39 

Gray and Creech, mimeograph 116.60 

Postage 10.00 

Relief and Annuity Board 72.00 

Bal. on hand, First Citizens Bank, Angier 102,23 



Respectfully Submitted, 

Harry D. Wood, Jr., Treas. 

58. The Moderator recognized Rev. S. Lewis Morgan, Jr., 
for the introduction of Miss Josephine Hughes, the new Educa- 
tional Director of the First Baptist Church, Dunn. Brother 
Morgan also moved that this association approve the program 
of the Allied Church League and that the Executive Commit- 
tee issue a call to other interested forces in this county to or- 
ganize for cooperation with the Allied Church League. The 
motion passed. 

59. Mrs. Miranda Matthews, of Chalybeate Springs, was 
recognized as having attended twenty consecutive sessions of 
the Little River Baptist Association. 

60. Rev. A. C. McCall was recognized for the report of 
the B. T. U., which was adopted, as follows: 

REPORT OF THE B. T. U. 

Dr. Walter N. Johnson in a conversation with the writer said 
a few days ago, "We are using the laboratory method in our ap- 
proach for truth everywhere except in religion." 

That there is a law of compensation running through life is 



LITTLE RIBER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 25 

too well established to be doubted. That is another way of saying that 
all of us here are what we are largely because of our training. We 
might as well face the fact, the next generation will be no better 
that the training they receive from our homes, schools and churches. 

The most arresting thing that we have ever faced is the thought 
that we may have neglected the religious training in our homes, 
schools, churches, until it is too late. Dr. Paul Hutchins, president 
of the University of Chicago, fears that this is true, and has asked 
for a year's leave of absence in order that he may help with a pro- 
gram of adult education. Because if those who are now adults 
do not get a better^ education than they now have, and get it quickly, 
the world may not last long enough for today's children to come to 
maturity and exercise any saving influence upon it, however well 
they may be trained. Dr. Alexander Meiklejohn in a book, "Beyond 
Victory," said the same thing three years ago, and Dr. P. A. Sorokin, 
in his book, *'The Crises of Our Age," thinks the same. All of which 
indicated that religious training has been and is now on a low level. 

I think around this matter of training you will find the weak- 
est place in our churches. If you will be wise in your selection, and 
get a certain type of preacher, you can get crowds of people together, 
raise a lot of money, and count up a large number as they say (Who 
were saved) whatever that may mean. But to get the educated, in- 
fluential, economically secure church people to take this business 
of training seriously enough to meet regularly Sunday after Sunday, 
and work hard during the week to make the training union grow. 
and bless the church, that is another matter. I think that the reason 
why the apocalyptic view of religion is held by so many is because 
it is a much easier philosophy of life than to follow the teaching, 
training program, found more clearly in the teachings of Jesus. 

I wish I could impress upon your minds and hearts the import- 
ance of this training union program for our churches 
in such a manner. That we all would resolve to organize a training 
union in the churches where there is no training union, and to dedi- 
cate whatever talents we have in making the training union in our 
churches more helpful. I will make this rather radical statement, 
any church can have a great training union if 10 adult people of the 
church and community will dedicate themselves to work together 
in making it possible. If you will look at the churches whose train- 
ing unions are blessing the church you will find a loyal group of 
adults. Maybe this might help. Two of the greatest teachers in my 
mind were Jesus and Socrates and they taught adults. 

During the last associational year we had two associational-wide 
training union meetings. The first one was with the Friendship 
Church. The second one was with the Neill's Creek Church. We did 
not have a meeting during the Summer because many of the train- 
ing union people went to Ridgecrest and Vacation Bible Schools, and 



26 1946 ASSOCIATION AL MINUTES 

other religious meetings in the association. The two meetings were 
well attended. 

Four training unions have been organized this year: Holly 
Springs, Erwin First, Dunn Second, and Harmony. The following 
churches have had training union study courses: Angier, Antioch, 
Buies Creek, Chalybeate Sprigs, Dunn First, Erwin First, Friendship, 
Harmony, Holly Springs. 

Respectfully Submitted, 
A. D. McCall. 

62. Brother Harvey T. Gibson, State B. T. U. Director, 
was recognized to speak concerning the possibilities of training. 

63. The Moderator appointed a committee on Fields of 
Churches as follows. A. Paul Bagby, G. Scott Turner, Julius 
Holloway. 

64. Dr. A. Paul Bagby was recognized for the report on 
Christian Education which was adopted as follows: 

REPORT ON CHRISTIAN EDUCATION 

The report we make tonight will be a more limited one than 
the subject would suggest. We recognize without hesitation the 
great work other denominations are doing in the field of education, 
and acclaim it Christian; but we pass it by with a salute. And, too, 
we surely recognize the great work in other states than North Caro- 
lina that Baptists are doing in the field of education. We also pass 
it by with a bow. We, the messengers of the Little River Association, 
are connected with and deeply concerned about Christian Education 
of every denominational hue; and we are also more definitely con- 
nected with and more deeply concerned about Baptist education 
throughout our Southland. But, this report will foresee in brief 
Baptist education in North Carolina. Thus, we narrow our discussion 
in two ways. We might go so far as to be even more straightened, 
and limit ourselves to the presenting of the Baptist Colleges within 
our own District Association borders. The writer of this report, how- 
ever, is fully conscious of the fact that the welfare of Campbell 
College is dependent upon the glory of our all too loose Baptist 
education system in North Carolina. 

We resist the temptation of the indefinite advantage we might 
gain from statistics. We "lisp in numbers" until static blurs the 
meaning. 

The Council on Christian Education, composed of forty-two 
members, has done, and is still doing, much to coordinate the work 
of Baptist education in North Carolina. Five schools are now in our 
system with the likelihood, almost certainty, that by Jan. 1, 1947 
there will be six. We, shall then have two senior and four junior 



LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 27 

colleges. All of them have their faces toward a greater day. They 
must move together. 

Whenever our churches realize that these are really our schools, 
we'll be more alert to their call upon us; yes, we'll be slow to criticize 
(unless that criticism be well founded and constructive), and quick 
to defend and support them. 

Respectfully submitted, 
A. Paul Bagby. 

66. Various College Faculty members, students, and 
former students of Baptist schools and colleges were recognized. 

67. Moderator Campbbell presented the following young 
people, students at Campbell College, Robert Barbour and Neil 
Downing, each of whom sang a solo accompanied by Miss Helen 
Carr, pianist. 

68. Dr. A. Paul Bagby presented Dr. Carlyle Campbell, 
President of Meredith College, who spoke on the subject of 
Christian Education. 

69. The Association sang the first Stanza of the hymn 
Blest Be The Tie That Binds" and considered itself adjourned 
after the benediction led by Rev. A. C. McCall. 



m 



1946 ASSOCIATIONAL MINUTES 



Our Beloved Dead 



•AHTIOCH— 
Mr, J. W. Byrd 
Mrs. Jennie B. Patterson 

AHGIER— 

Miss Janet Ann Hockaday 
Mrs. Lawrence Kelly 
Mrs. Charlie Phillips 

BAPTIST GROVE— 
Mr. O. G. Baucom 

BHOADWAY— 

Mrs. Annie Sou Stone 
Mr. Stanley Kelly 

BUIES CREEK— 
Mrs. Charlie Cotton 
Mr. H. C. Ousley, Jr. 
Mr. Fulton Lanier 
Mr. Joe Upchurch 
Mr. John Butts 

CHALYBEATE SPRINGS— 
Mrs. Lorena Graddy 
Mrs. Ida Hamilton 
Mr. G. B. Johnson 
Mrs. Lessie Smith 
Mr. Hermas Senter 

COATS— 

Mrs. J. D. Newton 

' DUNN, First— 

Mrs. Tom L. Fitzgerald 

Mrs. O. C. Duncan 

Mrs. Ella (V/. R.) Holland 



DUNN, Second- 
Mr. E. M. Slaughter 

ERWIN, First- 
Mr. M. C. Brown (Deacon) 
Mr. J. A. Holt 

Mr. D. F. Stevens 

Mr. A. L. Morris 

Mr. N. M. Penny 

Mrs. Martha Jane Willis 

FRIENDSHIP— 
Mrs. Ed. Byrd 

HOLLY SPRINGS— 
Mrs. Lillie Jane Thomas 
Mrs. Ida Collins 
Mr. H. Y. Smith (Deacon) 

KENNEBEC— 

Mrs. Nancy McLeod 
Mrs. Nera Smith 

LILLINGTON— 
Mr. A. H. Phelps 
Mr. J. Earl Ward 
Miss Ellen Salmon 

MACEDONIA— 
Mrs. Emma Wheeler 

NEILLS CREEK— 

Mr. Walter Johnson (Deacon) 

OAK GROVE— 
^ Mr. J. C. Cutts 

Mrs. Ella Turlington 

SWANNS STATION— 
Mr. J. V. Gillmore 



LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 29 

Auxiliary Meetings * 

None other than the work of the various divisions of the work". 
These are covered in the various department reports. j 

Ordained Ministers Who Are Not Pastors 

Rev. J. E. Ayscue Buies Creek 

Rev. J. F. Blackmon - Buies Creek 

Rev. S. O. Brandon Buies Creek 

Rev. W. T. Campbell Rt. 2, Fuquay Springs 

Rev. R. F. Hall Lillington 

Rev. Lester Mann - - Durhani 

Rev. Connell Smith Rt. 2, Fuquay Springs' 

Educational Directors 

Dunn, First, Miss Josephine Hughes Dunn 

Ministers Ordained This Year 

Rev. Joe Belcher, Pleasant Memory Church Gaffney, S. C, 

Rev. Aaron Phipps, Oak Grove Church Buies Creel?^ 

Students for the Ministr37 

James P. Blanton Campbell College, Buies Creek 

Ceroid Bridges Campbell College, Buies Creek 

Frank B. Caldwell Campbell College, Buies Creek 

Thomas C. Faircloth _ Wake Forest College, Erwin 

Lindsey Harrell Campbell College, Buies Creek 

Alton Hayes Manchester 

Harold Lester Campbell College, Buies Creek 

Henry Morgan Wake Forest College, Lillington 

David Poe Campbell College, Buies Creek 

Connell Smith Bowman Gray, Rt. 2, Fuquay Springs 

Alpheuse Stallings Campbell College, Buies Creek, 

George Waddell Campbell College, Buies Creek 

Dudley Witcher Campbell College, Buies Creek 

Choir Directors or Song Leaders ' 

Antioch Mrs. H. G. Patterson Mamers 

Angler Mrs. H. D. Wood, Jr Angier 

Baptist Grove W. J. Campbell Fuquay Springs 

Bethel Leland Matthews Rt. 1, Linden 

Broadway Henry A. Thomas Broadway 

Buies Creek Mrs. A. E. Lynch Buies Creek 

Chalybeate Springs T. L. Caviness .... Rt. 2, Fuquay Springs, 

Coats Mrs. T. H. Fleming Coats. 

Cumberland Union J. O. W^eathers .... Rt. 2, Fuquay Springs; 

Dunn, First W. L. Thames Dunn» 



m 1946 ASSOCIATION AL MINUTES 

Buon, Second ^ B. O. Slaughter Dunn 

Erwin, East .W. C. Stone Erwin 

Srwin, First Mrs. D. C. Woodall Erwin 

Friendship Archibald Byrd Bunnlevel 

Harmony H. S. Hedgepeth Rt. 1, Bunnlevel 

Kennebec „N. T. McLean Rt. 1, Coats 

Lillipgton ^Miss Gwenn Wilborn Lillington 

Macedonia Xeo Weathers Rt. 1, Hilly Springs 

Meiils Creek Miss Gladys M. Smith .... Rt. 2, Angler 

Oak Grove Miss Ada Denton Rt. 2, Angler 

Pleasant Memory R. J. Williams Coats 

Piney Grove W. L. Norris Holly Springs 

Rawls - Henry Rawls Rt. 1, Fuquay Springs 

Swamis Station H. W. Graham Rt. 1, Jonesboro 

Pianist or Organist 

Aniioch Mrs. C. W. Kelly Rt. 3, Lillington 

Angler Miss Katherine Campbell Angler 

Baptist Grove Miss Verna Hardee Fuquay Springs 

Sethel Mrs. lUie Matthews Manchester 

Broadway Mrs. Dellethe Woodall 

Buies Creek Mrs. A. E. Lynch Buies Creek 

Chalybeate Springs Mrs. W. M. Pearson Chalybeate Springs 

Coats Mrs. C. G. Fuquay Coats 

Cumberland Union Miss Gladys Sears .... Rt. 1, Fuquay Springs 

Dunn, First Mrs. C. C. Upchurch Dunn 

Ounn, Second Mrs. Marie S. Godwin Dunn 

Erwin, East Mrs. O. W. Pulley Erwin 

Erwin! First Miss Janet Byrd 

fi'riendship Mrs. W. G. Massingill Rt. 1, Erwin 

Harmony Mrs. Elsie B. Souders 

Hoily Springs Miss Bessie McNeill Broadway 

i^ennebec „.Mrs. EUie Dickens Rt. 1, Willow Springs 

Lillington Miss Gwen Wilborn — Lillington 

Macedonia Miss Lena Weathers Rt. 1, Holly Springs 

Weills Creek ^..Miss Alyda M. Smith, Rt. 2, Angler 

Oak Grove Mrs. Ada Denton Rt. 2, Angler 

Pleasant Memory Mrs. Salmon Penny Rt. 1, Coats 

Piney Grove Miss Joyce Adcock Rt. 1, Holly Springs 

Hawls Miss Marie Jines Rt. 1, Fuquay Springs 

S¥/anns Station Mrs. N. B. Castleberry Rt. 1. Jonesboro 

Librarians 

Ikptioch Miss Thelma Matthews Rt. 3, Lillington 

Punn, First Mr. T. A. Core Dunn 

Pmn, Second Frank Giles Rt. 5, Dunn 

f€oUy' Springs ~Mrs. Ruth Patterson Broadway 



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LITTLE RIVER 

BAPTIST 
ASSOCIATION 

North Carolina 

Seventy-Second Annual Session 

held with 
First Baptist CKurch of Dunn 

Tuesday, October 28th 

1947 



The seventy-third annual session will be held 

with the Macedonia Baptist Church 

Tuesday, October 26, 1948 

Annual Sermon to Be Preached by Dr. A. Paul Bagby 
Rev. Raymond E. Moore, Alternate 



LITTLE RIVER 

BAPTIST 
ASSOCIATION 

NortK Carolina 

Seventy-Second Annual Session 

held with 
First Baptist Clinrcli of Dunn 

Tuesday, October 28th 

1947 



The seventy-third annual session will be held 

with the Macedonia Baptist Church 

Tuesday, October 26, 1948 

Annua! Sermon to Be Preached by Dr. A. Paul Bagby 
Rev. Raymond E. Moore, Alternate 



2 LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 

INDEX 

ASSOCIATIONAL DIRECTORY 3 

CHURCH DIRECTORIES 31 

CONSTITUTION 8 

HISTORICAL TABLE BEGINS 39 

LIST OF MESSENGERS 6 

OUR BELOVED DEAD 30 

PROCEEDINGS 10 

REPORTS 

AMERICAN BIBLE SOCIETY 15 

BAPTIST TRAINING UNION 26 

COLLEGES 27 

DUNCAN CHAPEL 28 

EVANGELISM 11 

MISSIONS AT HOME AND ABROAD 12 

NOMINATIONS COMMITTEE 17 

ORPHANAGE 18 

RELIGIOUS LITERATURE 23 

RESOLUTIONS COMMITTEE 17 

SUNDAY SCHOOL 14 

TEMPERANCE AND SOCIAL EVILS 24 

TIME, PLACE AND PREACHER 17 

TREASURER'S REPORT 21 

WOMAN'S MISSIONARY UNION 11 

STATISTICAL TABLES BEGIN 32 




MRS. D. B. ANDREWS 



These minutes of this, the Seventy-Second Annual 
Session of the Little River Baptist Association, are dedi- 
cated to MRS. D. B. ANDREWS, of the Chalybeate 
Springs Baptist Church, Chalybeate Springs, N. C. For 
three years now Mrs. Andrews has been Superintendent 
of the Little River Woman's Missionary Society, and 
during this time she has proven her faith by her works 
of love and loyalty in leading the women of this associa- 
tion. She has been nearly all her life a teacher in the 
Sunday School, several times President of her own W. M. 
S., a Deaconess in the Chalybeate Springs Church and 
member of the Executive Board of this Association. 

With this dedication go the prayers and pledge of 
loyalty of this Association. 



LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 3 

DIRECTORY 

Officers of the Association 

Moderator: Dr. Leslie H. Campbell, Buie's Creek 

Vice-Moderator Rev. Sam Hudson Lillington 

Clerk-Treasurer, Rev. H. D. Wood, Jr. Angier 

EXECUTIVE BOARD MEMBERS 

Leslie H. Campbell, Moderator Buie's Creek 

Sam Hudson, Vice-Moderator Lillington 

Harry D. Wood, Jr., Clerk-Treasurer Angier 

Raymond E. Moore, Superintendent of S. S. Mamers 

Truby Powell, Training Union Director Lillington 

Mrs. D. B. Andrews, W. M. U. Supt. Fuquay Springs 

G. Scott Turner, Supt. of Evangelism Chalybeate Springs 

Associational Missionary 

W. H. Stephenson Angier 

Dr. C. D. Bain Dunn 

J. G. Layton Lillington 

Forrest Maxwell Erwin 

ASSOCIATIONAL OFFICERS OF WOMAN'S MISSIONARY 

UNION 

Supt., Mrs. D. B. Andrews Rt. 2, Fuquay Springs 

Associate Supt. Mrs. J. A. McLeod Dunn 

Secretary-Treasurer, Mrs. H. H. Hamilton Lillington 

Young People's Leader,Mrs. Robert L. Young Angier 

Literature Chairman, Mrs. L. Jackson Erwin 

Mission Study Chairman, Mrs. H. D. Wood, Jr. Angier 

Community Missions Chairman, Mrs. C. R. Ammons Lillington 

Stewardship Chm., Miss Lillian Draughon Rt. 5, Dunn 

Margaret Fund Chm. Mrs. A. Paul Bagby Buie's Creek 

White Cross Chairman, Mrs. Joseph Depree Angier 

Royal Ambassador Counselor, Rev. S. L. Page — Rt. 3, Lillington 

Training School Chairman, Mrs. W. E. Page Rt. 3, Lillington 

Nominating Com. Chairman, Mrs. Forest Maxwell Erwin 

ASSOCIATIONAL SUNDAY SCHOOL OFFICERS 

Gen. Supt. R. E. Moore, Mamers 

Supt. Emeritus G. G. Page, Buie's Creek 



4 LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 

Supt. Enargement Berles Johnson, Lillington 

Supt. Training Mrs. R. E. Moore, Mamers 

Supt. Evangelism Rev. G. Scott Turner, Chalybeate Spgs. 

Supt. V. B. S Irvin Stephens, Rt. 2, Lillington 

Gen. Secretary Miss Lottie Patterson, Mamers 

Supt. Ext. Dept. Mrs. Leslie Turlington, Buie's Creek 

Supt. Adult Dept. L. Jackson, Erwin 

Supt. Young People's Dept. Miss Martha Ballard, Kipling 

Supt. Int. Dept. Mrs. R. A. Duncan, Dunn 

Supt. Junior Dept. Mrs. I. K. Stafford, Buie's Creek 

Supt. Primary Dept. Miss Mamie Haighv/ood, Lillington 

Supt. Beginner Dept. Mrs. George Souders, Rt. 2, Lillington 

Supt. Cradle Roll Dept. Mrs. H. M. O'Quinn, Mamers 

Supt. Nursery Dept. Mrs. C. L. Guy, Dunn 

Group Leaders: 

Western Group Leary Knight, Broadway 

Northern Group Mollis Fowler, Rt. 1, Fuquay 

Southern Group Geo. Souders, Rt. 2, Lillington 

Eastern Group Dr. C. D. Bain, Dunn 

ASSOCIATIONAL OFFICERS OF BAPTIST TRAINING 

UNION 

General Director — Truby A. Powell Lillington 

Assoc. Director — L. L. Coats Dunn 

Secretary — Miss Alice Patterson Lillington 

Chorister ?Ars. D. C. Woodall Erwin 

Pianist — Mrs. Carl Byrd Erwin 

Pastor Advisor — Rev. A. C. McCall Bunnlevel 

Adult Leader — Miss Lillian Draughon Dunn 

Young People's Leader — Miss Jo Hughes Dunn 

Intermediate Leader — Mrs. E. L. Powell Mamers 

Junior Leader — Miss Bessie McNeill Broadway 

Story Hour Leader — Miss Addie Prevatte Buie's Creek 

Hymn Festival Leader — Mrs. Carl Byrd Erwin 

Group Leaders: 

Western Group — Miss Irma Knight Broadway 

Northern Group — Miss Hazel Matthews Kipling 

Southern Group — Herbert Hood Bunnlevel 

Eastern Group — Mr. George Waddell 

OFFICERS OF ASSOCIATIONAL BROTHERHOOD 
None 



LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 5 

STANDING COMMITTEES 

Chm. on Christian Literature Mrs. L. Jackson, Erwin 

Chm. on Orphanage Mr. Leslie Pittman, Broadway 

Chm. on Missions Miss Mattie Bain, Coats 

Chm. on Temperance Truby A. Powell, Lillington 

Chm. on Baptist Hospital Leary Knight, Broadway 

Chm. on Ministers' Annuities Mrs. j. G. Layton, Lillington 

Chm. on Christian Education Rev. A. L. Faulk, Dunn 

MAIN OFFICERS OF BAPTIST INSTITUTIONS 

L. H. Campbell, President, Campbell College, Buie's 
Creek 

Mrs. J. G. Layton, member. Board of Trustees, Campbell 
College, Lillington 

B. F. McLeod, President, Board of Trustees, Campbell 
College, Buie's Creek 

S. L. Morgan, Jr., m.ember N. C. Council on Christian Ed- 
ucation, Dunn 

D. H. Senter, member, Board of Trustees, Campbell Col- 
lege, Chalybeate Springs 

H. D. Wood, Jr., member. General Board of the Baptist 
State Convention, Angier 

CALENDAR OF ACTIVITIES FOR 1947-48 

No calendar was adopted in the absence of an Associa- 
tional Missionary. As soon as one can be employed, the Exe- 
cutive Board will attempt to formulate such a calendar. 



LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



LIST of MESSENGERS 

While the attendance was approximately 500, these whose 
names follow were recognized as official messengers by the 
churches according to the Constitution. 

ANGIER— C. W. Flowers, A. C. Barefoot, James B. Flowers, 

Mrs. A. L. Overby, Mrs. W. H. Stephenson 
ANTIOCH— Mrs. H. M. O'Quinn, Erwin Stephens, Mrs. Er- 

win Stephens, H. G. Patterson, Lee O'Quinn 
BAPTIST CHAPEL— None 
BAPTIST GROVE— Edward Johnson, Mrs. W. E. Hardee, D. 

G. Sexton, H. M. Johnson, Mrs. W. L, Lee. 
BETHEL— Mrs. Ollie Matthews, W. P. West, Alton Hayes, 

Lewis West. 
BROADWAY— J. B. Frye, Owen Tayor, J. A. Pittman, Mrs. J. 

D. Berry, Mr. G. L. Stone. 
BUIE'S CREEK— B. M. Marshbanks, G. G. Page, T. T. Lanier, 

L. H. Campbell. 
CHALYBEATE SPRINGS— Mrs. D. B. Andrews, Mrs. W. A. 

Matthews, Mrs. Kemp Smith, E. W. Smith, R. W. McDonald. 
COATS— Mrs. T. D. Stewart, Owen Odum, W. E. Nichols, Alton 

Grimes, Newton Byrd. 
CUMBERLAND UNION— None. 
DUNN, FIRST— Dr. J. M. Morgan, Miss Lillian Draughon, Mrs. 

C. T. Latimer, Mrs. V. I. Rice, Mrs. Henry Whittenton 
DUNN, SECOND— Mrs. M. A. Knox, M. A. Knox, B. O. 

Slaughter, M. B. Faircloth, Allen Wright. 
ERWIN, EAST— Paul Tart, Herbert McLamb, Mrs. Alice 

Collins, W. J. Davis, Mrs. W. W. Tyndall. 
ERWIN, FIRST— Mrs. L. E. Stancil, Mrs. Forrest Maxwell, 

Junious Pallune, Ralph Ennis, J. H. McKee. 
FRIENDSHIP— W. G. Massengill, Worth L. Byrd, Horace Be- 

thune, Mrs. A. E. Jones, Mrs. C. A. Strickland. 
HARMONY— G. R. Souders, A. M. Thomas, E. B. atta, H. S. 

Hedgepeth, Mrs. John Morgan. 



LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 7 

HOLLY SPRINGS— Paul Patterson, Landis Boher, B. B. Wil- 

son, Pierce Patterson, Leona Wilson. 
KENNEBEC— M. T. Olive, N. S. McLean, C. J. Howard, W. 

R. Upchurch, Rayford Smith. 
LAYTON'S CHAPEL— Hartwell Butts, C. W. Pointer, E. L. 

Hill, Mrs. L. K. Clark, Mrs. Marvin West. 
LILLINGTON— N. W. Maness, J. E. Womble, J. C. Bullock, 

Mrs. S. P. L. Lee, Mrs. C R. Ammons. 
MACEDONIA— Leo Weathers, J. C. Smith, Roy Weathers, J. 

E. Hold, S. M. Hobby. 
NEILLS CREEK— W. T. Campbell, Mrs. Hugh Johnson, Mrs. 

A. L. Johnson, J. O. McLeod, Hugh Johnson. 
OAK GROVE— None 
PINEY GROVE— Mr. H. O. Austin, Mrs. R. M. Atkins, H. T. 

Lawrence, Mrs. M. D. Honeycutt, Mrs. Maranda Johnson. 
PLEASANT MEMORY— S. W. Turlington, Mrs. S. W. Tur- 
lington, Mrs. T. H. Penny, Bernice Weaver, Mrs. Berniece 

Weaver. 
RAWLS— Hollis Fowler, R. F. Jones, Henry Rawls, Mrs. O. D. 

Sherman, Miss Beatrice Rawls. 
SWANN'S STATION— E. C. Womack, Albert Sharpe, L. G 

Holt, A. R. Batchelor, Robert Godfrey 



LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



CONSTITUTION 

1. This association shall be known as "Little River Bap- 
tist Association." 

2 The object of this assv^^iation shall be the advancement 
of the Kingdom of Ciirist, and the means of accom.plishing this 
shall be in strict conformity v^ith the principles of the New Testa- 
ment. 

3. The association shall have no authority over the internal 
right of any church belonging to it and shall act only as an advis- 
ory council. 

4 The association shall be composed of messengers chosen 
by the churches connected v/ith it, each church being entitled to 
five delegates. Ordained ministers having oversight of churches 
in the association, or having their membership in these churches, 
shall also be received as messengers. 

5. A quorum shall consist of messengers from a majority of 
the churches of the association. 

6. The delegates from each church to the annual meeting of 
the association shall bear a letter certifying their appointment and 
giving an account of the condition of the church and a statement 
of all funds contributed for local and benevolent purposes. 

7. The officers of the association shall be a moderator, a 
vice-moderator, a clerk and a treasurer, who shall be chosen an- 
nually from the members composing the association, and shall 
continue in office until their successors are elected. The term 
of office of the moderator shall begin at the conclusion of the ses- 
sion at which he is elected and continue until the close of the next 
annual meeting. 

8. It shall be the duty of the moderator to preside during 
the deliberations of the body, to enforce the observance of the 
constitution, preserve the decorum, appoint committees except 
when other provisions are made for their appointment, decide 
all questions of order, giving his opinion on any question under 
discussion, and cast the deciding vote in case of a tie. 

9. It shall be the duty of the clerk to record the proceedings 
of each annual meeting of the association, superintend the print- 
ing of the minutes and their distribution among the churches. 

10. It shall be the duty of the treasurer to receive all funds 
sent by the churches or collected during the sessions of this body 
and to disburse the same for the objects stated. He shall present 
a report on all funds administered by him at each annual meeting. 



LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 9 

11. The association shall appoint, annually, a Promotion 
Committee composed of one member from each church in the as- 
sociation and the pastors of the churches. The moderator shall 
be chairman of this committee. The function of this committee 
shall be the promotion of Associational plans through the several 
churches. 

12. The association shall appoint annually an Executive Com- 
mittee of 12 members, amnog whom by virtue of their office are 
to be the moderator, vice-moderator, clerk-treasurer, S. S. Supt. 
of the Association, Training Union Director, W. M. U. Superin- 
tendent, Supt. of Evangelism, the Associational Missionary. This 
committee shall have general supervision of the affairs of the as- 
sociation during the interval between the meetings of the body: 
shall seek to promote the welfare of the churches, and their active 
participation in the causes fostered by the denomination; but shall 
be answerable to the association for its acts, and make an annu- 
al report to the association of its work. 

13. The association in annual meeting shall appoint a pres- 
bytery of four members to sit with the pastor of any person whose 
ordination is sought, and the moderator of the association, to 
examine the qualifications and opportunities for work of the can- 
didate. 

14. The association shall hold an annual meeting commenc- 
ing on Tuesday after the fourth Sunday in October. 

15. A meeting of the association may be called by the mod- 
erator at any time by the consent of five members of the Exe- 
cutive committee. Each church shall be notified of such a meet- 
ing in time to send delegates. 

16. This association shall have the right to exclude from its 
membership any church that departs from New Testament prin- 
ciples. 

17. Any church desiring to become a member of this asso- 
ciation may present a petition at the annual meeting of the body 
through delegates appointed for this purpose. If the association 
shall consent to receive such church the mioderator shall extend 
the hand of fellowship to the delegates. 

18. The association may invite visitors to seats and extend 
to them all the privileges of delegates except that of voting. 

19. By appointment, at each annual meeting, an intro- 
duciory sermon, and a sermon or address on missions shall be 
delivered. 

20. This constitution may be amended at any annual ses- 
sion, by a vote of two-thirds of the delegates present, provided 
that notice shall be given before the day that such motion will 
be presented. 



10 LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 

PROCEEDINGS 

MORNING SESSION 

1. The 72nd Annual Session of the Little River Baptist 
Association opened with the singing of the hymn 'AH Hail 
The Power of Jesus' Name" in the First Baptist Church of 
Dunn, N. C, Tuesday morning, Oct. 28, 1947, at 10:00 A. M. 

2. Brother A. C. McCall Pastor of Friendship Baptist 
Church conducted a few minutes of spiritual meditation, ask- 
ing the questtion, "Why did Jesus weep over Jerusalem?" 

3. Mr. E. C. Aldridge, Mayor of Dunn, was recognized. 
He extended the welcome of tthe city to the association. 

4. Brother B. M. Marshbanks, Bursar of Campbell Col- 
lege, responded to this welcome for the Association. 

5. The clerk called the roll. On motion by brother A. 
C. McCall those so named in the letters constitute this session 
of the association. This motion passed. All churches were 
represented except Bethel. 

6. The dates of organization of our several churches 
were corrected in the table. Several churches had been re- 
porting the dates of erection of their present meeting house. 
With some question, this list is presumed to be correct. See 
the tables. 

7. Mrs. S. L. Morgan, Jr., of Dunn, was recognized for 
the Memorial Service. The list of our dead appears on a page 
at the close of these proceedings. 

8. Brother A. C. McCall moved that the printed pro- 
gram be adopted as our order of business. Motion passed. 

9. Miss Zula Rogers, former Associational Missionary, 
now Student in the W. M. S. Training School, Louisville, Ky., 
was recognized for words of greetings. 

10. Brother Sam Hudson, Vice-Moderator, took the 
chair and recognized Brother Leslie H. Campbell, Moderator, 
for his remarks. 

11. Mrs. D. B. Andrews, President of the Little River 
Baptist Association W. M. S. was recognized for her report. 

12. Brother Hudson recognized Brother A. C. McCall 
who moved that a committee be appointed to consider the Mod- 
erator's report. Motion passed. This committee was appoint- 



LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 1 1 

ed to consist of C. W. Flowers, Forrest Maxwell, and Mrs. D. 
B. Andrews. 

13. Brother G. Scott Turner was recognized for his re- 
port on Evangelism. This report was adopted as follows: 

REPORT ON EVANGELISM 

All churches held revival services this year. Eight churches 
had two revivals and one church reported three meetings. Ev- 
ery church had additions by baptism, the largest number for one 
church vv^as 51, the smallest, 3, The total number of baptisms 
was — . 

The only real missionary evangelistic work was carried on 
by the Angier Church which held two Mission Bible Schools and 
held evangelistic services in connection with them. 

Your committee urges our churches to engage in real mission- 
ary activity and all our members to be personal soul winners. 
Respectfully submitted, 
G. Scott Turner 

14. Brother R. E. Moore was recognized for his report 
on Missions at Home and Abroad. 

15. Brother T. H. Williams moved that the three general 
reports mentioned in paragraphs 11, 13, and 14 above be 
adopted. Motion passed. These reports follow: 

REPORT OF WOMAN'S MISSIONARY UNION 

Luke tells us that during the days of our Lord's sojourn on 
earth certain vv^omen who had been healed of evil spirits and in- 
firmities, ministered unto Him of their substance. In like man- 
ner, during the past year, the women of our association have 
brought to Him gifts of love and adoration. These have come 
from hearts filled with gratitude impelled by His great love for 
us. "For the love of Christ constraineth us.*' 

Our annual meeting held in the Buie's Creek Baptist Church 
last April was well attended. In September our Young People's 
Rally, under the leadership of Mrs. Robert L. Young, brought in- 
spiration to a large group of young people. In October our di- 
visional meeting was held in Oxford. Fifty-one women from our 
Association attended this meeting — 31 going by chartered bus. 

We have W. M. U. organizations in 24 churches, leaving only 
3 with no organization. Enrolled are 595 women and 720 young 
people. Our youngest missionary society is in the Rawls Church. 
Organized in July with 6 members, they now number 14, with 
Mrs. Rex Bradley as president. 

Mrs. Harry D. Wood, our Mission Study Chairman, has done 
-an outstanding piece of work in her department. From rather in- 



12 LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 

complete reports, we learn that 724 women have attended our Asso- 
ciational mission study classes. Many other classes were held in 
individual societies and young people's organizations. 

Under the direction of Mrs. C. R. Ammons, our women have 
ministered to many within our own Association. 

Our gifts of money showed a total of more than $10,000.00. 
But Vv^ho can evaluate the time, the strength, the study, and the 
praj-ers of those women whose untiring efforts make our reports 
possible? Some have planted, others have watered, but "God 
gave the increase." In everything, and for every increase we give 
praise unto Him, knowing that He is able to lead us gloriously 
through the unknov/n future of the years ahead. 
Respectfully submitted, 
Mrs. D. B. Andrews 

REPORT ON MISSIONS AT HOME AND ABROAD 

We as Missionary Baptists are under inescapable obligation, 
to a greater degree than ever before to minister to the needy mul- 
titudes around the globe. We must foUov/ in the steps of Him who 
went about doing good, and seek the leadership of the Holy Spir- 
it in the supreme task of Christianizing the world. This obligation 
v/as emphasized at the 7th Baptist World Alliance Congress in Co- 
penhagen in the theme: "Every Baptist a Missionary." 

There are two general observations that we might make con- 
cerning missions: First, the task of missions needs to concern not 
only the women and children, but the men as well. It is a man- 
sized task. Our entire church with all the organizations should 
be engaged in this great task. Second, missions at home and 
abroad are inseparable. We cannot be good missionaries at home 
and neglect the people far away, neither can we overlook the 
needs, near us and do effective mission work in the foreign fields. 
As churches, we can do this by having a part in our local churches, 
our association, our state, our home fields, and our foreign fields. 
Our Baptist program provides a channel through which individual 
churches can have a part in the great Baptist undertaking; name- 
ly the Cooperative Program. 

The needs for missions are greater than ever before. Local 
churches need to awake to the fact that they can and should 
support full-time programs, Associational Missionary work is 
just in its infancy, the opportunities for churches and for work 
among various classes of people in our state and homeland are 
numerous, and foreign mission needs are urgent. Since the war 
the doors to missions are open to hear the gospels as never before. 
Now is the time to send missionaries. The discovery of the Atom- 
ic energy has made it imperative that the nations of the world 
stand together as Christian brothers in this "Global Age" or civi- 
lization may perish. Increased prices, destroyed property to be 



LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 13 

rebuilt, new fields to be opened, and proper maintenance of our 
missionaries on these fields make it imperative also that budgets 
be greatly increased. 

If we are to meet the needs of our time and extend the pro- 
gram of Christ, the following things must need be done: 

1. Inform the people as to the work that is being done and 
present the needs in the various places. This information can be 
obtained from The Commission, Hom,e Mission, The Biblical Re- 
corder and other periodicals. These should be read and studied reg- 
ularly. 

2. Stress the doctrine of Stewardship of life and money. Once 
our people are won to Bible stewardship we will have enough money 
md enough consecrated leadership to enlarge all phases of our 
educational and missionary work. The effect to get our people to 
tithe is tremendously important. Last May at the St. Louis Con- 
vention in every phase of our work that was presented, needs for 
more funds were cited. In each case it was said that the problem 
can be solved if our people can be led to tithe. 

3. The fundamentals of missionary service must not be neg- 
lected as we consider the various phases. The essential things in 
missionary service are— THE HOLY SPIRIT, PRAYER, COM- 
PASSION, AND THE MISSIONARY MESSAGE. Let us remem- 
ber that it is not by might nor by prayer, "but by my Spirit, saith 
the Lord." 

May we as people of the Little River Association ''wait upon 
the Lord" at the family altar, and may we in all our church or- 
ganizations, as well as in the pulpits present the needs and the 
method of meeting these needs in missions. May our gifts to the 
Cooperative program be increased by causing the number of tith- 
ers from each church to be increased. May we sincerely pray and 
work that, "Thy Kingdom come, thy will be done on earth as it is 
in Heaven." 

Respectfully submitted, 
Raymond E. Moore 

16. Brother M. A. Huggins, Executive Secretary of the 
Baptist State Convention was recognized for a brief message 
on the present and future of our state and world-wide work. 

17. Moderator Campbell appointed the following com- 
mittees 

Time, Place and Preacher: C. E. Ruff in, E. C. Keller, 
Mrs. T. H. Penny. 

Organizations: Louis Morgan, Zula Rogers, A. C. Bare- 
foot, G. G. Page, Mrs. D. B. Andrews. 

Resolutions: T. H. Williams, B. B. Wilson, Mrs. N. W. 
Maness. 



14 LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATIO N 

18. The Moderator recognized :the following visitors:: 
Supt. W. C. Reed, Kennedy Home Orphanage, Kinston. 
A. Lincoln Fulk, pastor from New South River, Asso. 

T. D. Lide, of Greenville, S. C. 

Rev. and Mrs. Waldo Early. 

Mrs. C. W. Wall, of Winston-Salem. 

A. J. Hall from the Johnston Association. 

19. Brother G. G. Page, Associational Sunday School 
Superintendent, was recognized for his report which was 
adopted as follows: 

REPOKT OF THE SUNDAY SCHOOL 

Our Sunday Schools have shown substantial growth during the 
year. An enrollment of 5903 is reported which shovvrs a net gain of 
460 over last year; and an average attendance of 3091 or net 
gain of 313. As your general superintendent I have visited most 
of the churches and am prepared to testify of the fine quality of 
administration and teaching in all of our Sunday Schools. Our 
building facilities are extremely limited and the attendance in the 
young peoples' and the adult departments should be greatly in- 
creased. While many of our churches are enlarging or improving 
their buildings the need is still urgent for more teaching facilities. 
VACATION BIBLE SCHOOL 

As a department of the Sunday School work 33 vacation Bible 
schools were conducted, one for each of the churches and six 
missions schools. The total number of persons reached in these 
schools was 2995 which included 217, one-day pupils, and 319 fa- 
culty members. This is a gain of 323 over last year. The average 
attendance was 2,163. Fifty-one conversions were re- 
ported. The total cost to the denomination of these schools as 
reported v/as $519.76. Offerings made by the schools amounted to 
$285.53, a net cost of $234.23. This department is rapidly be- 
coming one of the most effective and economical phases of our 
teaching work. 

Respectfully submitted, 

G. G. Page, Asso. Supt. 

20. Brother S. L. Morgan, Jr., pastor of our host church, 
gave the Association the invitation to dinner and instructions 
as to how to get it. 

21. Mrs. Tom Finch sang "The Lord's Prayer" accom- 
panied at the organ by Mrs. Henry Whittenton. 

22. Rev. O. W. Pulley, Pastor of East Erwin Baptist 
Church, preached the annual sermon using as his Scripture 



LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 15 

John 1 :35 ff. After the sermon, Brother Pulley pronounced 
the benediction and blessing for the noon meal. The Asso- 
ciation stood adjourned until the afternoon session. 

AFTERNOON SESSION 

23. After a most delightful dinner the association re- 
assembled and after singing "The Church's One Foundation" 
considered itself open for continuation of business. 

24. Rev. R. R. Lanier, formerly of Cumberland Union 
Church, led the prayer. He is now located in Virginia. 

25. Rev. W. G. Bullard, Association Mission Superin- 
tendent of the State Convention; Rev. and Mrs. Eugene Olive, 
of Wake Forest; and Dr. Garlyle Campbell, President of 
Meredith College, were recognized. 

26. Notice was taken of the fact that Brother C. W. Flow- 
ers of Angier had attended the past forty-nine consecutive 
sessions of the Association. 

27. Brother Sam Hudson was recognized for a message 
concerning our armed service veterans. 

28. Mrs. J. G. Lay ton was recognized to present a re- 
port from the American Bible Society. The report was adopt- 
ed as follows: 

REPORT OF THE AMERICAN BIBLE SOCIETY 

". . . the sword of the spirit, which is the word of God," is 
the Christian's weapon in unifying this chaotic world. 

For 131 years the American Bible Society has held to its one 
purpose of encouraging the circulation of the Scriptures through 
translation, publication and distribution without profit. In re- 
cent years a new service, Promotion of the Use of the Bible, has 
been added. 

Since 1835 the Society has gradually increased its ministry to 
the blind until today the Scriptures are available for the sightless 
in 33 different languages. 

Every man must have the Bible in his own native tongue if 
the message of Christ is to speak effectively to his heart. 

Some portions of Holy Writ have been translated in 1068 lan- 
guages spoken by nine-tenths of the human race. However, only 
one-tenth of the world's people now possess the printed word of 
God! Eight-tenths could have a copy if funds were available for 
printing and distribution. 

There are probably 1000 languages and dialects in which the 
Scriptures are yet to be translated and printed. Every year Gos- 



16 LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 

pels and other portions are being translated into languages for- 
merly possessing no part of the Bible. 

From time to time the entire New Testament and the whole 
Bible appear in languages in which lesser portions had previous- 
ly been translated and published. 

Most of the translations are made by missionaries working 
with natives skilled in the use of their language. 

Due to destruction in war-ravaged countries and to reduction 
or cessation of Bible printing in many other areas, the world- 
wide shortage of Scriptures is estimated to be 20,000,000 Bibles 
and 40,000,000 New Testaments. 

Distribution of Scriptures is through 20 offices in this country 
and 14 Bible Houses in foreign lands v/hich supervise work in 40 
countries. 

Here are some reports from secretaries in foreign lands: 

Brazil: Secretary Turner writes "I could sell twice as many 
Bibles if I had them." 

Other Latin American countries. "Able to absorb three times 
as many Scripture Volumes as are available. 

Cuba: "I can dispose of 5,000 Bibles at an Evangelical Con- 
ference here in Havana if only you can send them to me." 

China: "Ready to use many million copies. Greatly increased 
interest in the teachings of the Christian Scriptures." 

Japan: "Hungering for Bible knowledge." Dr. Kagawa, who 
is conducting extensive evangelical campaigns in Japan, in a let- 
ter of thanks to the Society, included this paragraph: "In a vil- 
lage near Tokyo about 1,000 non-Christian young people bought 
Bibles and organized by themselves into study groups, have se- 
cured teachers to teach them the Bible twice a week and are pay- 
ing 3 yen a month tuition." 

Germany: The Society's secretary from Geneva was sent into 
Germany to investigate the need and reported that 4,000,000 Bibles 
and 6,000,000 New Testaments were needed. 

Said he: "The occasional supplies of Scriptures reaching Ger- 
many disappear, when offered to the people, "like a drop of water 
on a hot stove." 

Paper mills, presses and workmen were found in Germany. 
Tons of raw material were shipped from Finland and the German 
churches are covering the cost of printing the Scriptures as long 
as the materials last. 

Mr. Chung, for the Korean Christians writes: "After 40 years 
under Japanese military rule, your gift of 50,000 Korean New Tes- 
taments were as sweet rain after many years of continued drought." 

Manila: "When the Natives learned that a shipment of Bibles 
in their own language had arrived, they pounded the door of the 
Bible House at 6 o'clock in the morning, in their eagerness to se- 
cure a copy before the supply was exhausted." 



LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 17 

From The Netherlands, Belgium, Poland, Hungary, Bulgaria, 
Czechoslovakia, Italy, Turkey, Greece, Siam; requests for Bibles 
in their native language far exceeds the supply. 

Beyonds the Society's regular budget for 1947 — in itself the 
largest ever undertaken, there still must be found $1,100,000 for 
the Emergency Needs. 

Of this amount Southern Baptists are asked to contribute $150,- 
000. 

"The deeper the furrow the war has plowed, the greater is the 
opportunity to sow the life-giving seed of the Gospel with assured 
faith in Jesus Christ who said, 'So is the Kingdom of God as if a 
man should cast seed into the ground.' " 

"My word . . . shall not return unto me void." 

Let us share the Bible generously and hasten the day when 
"the knowledge of the Lord shall cover the earth as the waters 
cover the sea." 

Respectfully submitted, 
Maude C. Lay ton 

29. The report of the Committee on Time, Place and 
Preacher was adopted as follows: Time — Tuesday after the 
fourth Sunday in October, 1948, Oct. 26. Place — Macedonia 
Baptist Church. Preacher — Dr. A. Paul Bagby, Buie's Creek; 
alternate Rev. Raymond E. Moore, Antioch. 

30. The report of the Committee on Nominations was 
adopted. These officers appear in the several lists at the be- 
ginning of these minutes. 

31. Report of the Committee on Resolutions was adopt- 
ed as follows: 

REPORT OF COMMITTEE ON RESOLUTIONS 

Your Committee on Resolutions in behalf of the membership 
of the Little Rover Association wishes to express our sincere ap- 
preciation to the pastor and members of the Dunn First Baptist 
Church and Second Baptist Church for their reception and every 
effort to make this, our 72nd annual meeting a success. 

We, therefore express our thanks to the Chamber of Com- 
merce for the beautiful flowers and to Mrs. Tom Finch and Mrs. 
Thurman Ennis for their contribution in special music. And to Mrs. 
R. A. Duncan, president of the W. M. S. for organizing and car- 
rying out with the other women of the church the bountiful din- 
ner that we enjoyed so much. 

To Mrs. Henry Whittington for the inspiring music. 

We would like to acknowledge with gratitude the generous 
publicity given our meeting by the Dunn Dispatch, and the cour- 



18 LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 

tesy of Radio Station WCKB in broadcasting 30-minutes of our 
afternoon session. 

To Brother L. H. Campbell, Moderator of our Association for 
his inspiring message and his untiring efforts through the years 
to advance the Kingdom of God in our Association. 
Respectfully submitted, 
T. H. WiUiams 
Mrs. N. W. Maness 
R. B. Wilson 

32. The Committee to Consider the Moderator's Report 
said they had no report. 

33. The Recommendations of the Executive Committee 
were presented by Brother Sam Hudson, vice-Moderator and 
Chairman of the Executive Committee. These recommenda- 
tions are listed in the following paragraphs numbered 35, 37, 38, 
and 39. 

34. Brother Morgan moved that we vote as individual 
delegates and not as churches. Motion passed. 

35. The first recommendation of the Executive Commit- 
tee was that the work of the Associational Missionary be con- 
tinued. Fifty-eight delegates voted in favor of this motion. 
None against. The motion passed. 

36. Brother Morgan moved that the business of the Asso- 
ciation be discontinued for thirty-five minutes in order that 
Brother W. G. McGee of the Baptist Hospital and Brother W. 
C. Reed of the Baptist Orphanage might have their messages 
broadcast by the generosity of Radio Station WCKB, Dunn, 
N. C. Motion passed. The report on the Orphanage was adopt- 
ed as follows: , i; f | 

REPORT ON BAPTIST ORPHANAGE 

There are certain reasons why orphanages and other child 
caring agencies are necessary. Among these are poverty, poor 
health, illiteracy and instability in the home. 

The Baptist Orphanage was founded for the purpose of car- 
ing for orphan children and yet one of the chief concerns of wel- 
fare agencies of the present time is the wrecked home. There 
ar over a thousand children in the orphanages of North Carolina 
who have both parents living. 

The chief function of the home is to bring children into the 
world and to rear them. No other institution in all Christian civ- 
ilization has a legal moral right to bring children into the world. 



LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 19 

With all of our progress no substitute has yet been found for a 
Christian home. 

The Baptist Orphanage has rarely ever been able to accept 
all the children for whom applications have been made and yet 
it has probably been too much on the receiving end of the line. 
A great surgeon does not operate until he has made a thorough 
diagnosis. Institutions should analyze and get the background of 
each case before a child is admitted. Providing food, clothing and 
shelter is not the full answer. Many children for whom applica- 
tions are made should never come to the orphanage. Peter at 
the Gate Beautiful would have done the beggar grave injustice 
if he had given him money. Instead he said: ''Silver and gold 
have I none; but such as I have give I thee: in the name of Je- 
sus Christ of Nazareth rise up and walk." 

We believe that one of the greatest services the orphanage can 
render is to make it possible for parents and children to help 
themselves. In addition to service we are rendering children in 
the orphanage we should help preserve and improve homes that 
are in danger of breaking down. Last year the orphanage, 
through its case work helped to make adjustments for more than 
four hundred children where applications had been made to en- 
ter the orphanage. Perhaps this is one of the best services the 
orphanage rendered. 

In order to care for more children during these days when 
it is so expensive to build, the orphanage authorities are de- 
veloping a program of boarding home care. This enables them 
to place children in good homes under the supervision of the 
orphanage and thus give many children the privilege of having a 
good home without placing them in the institution. 

Last year the orphanage cared for seven hundred children; 
sixty of these were cared for in boarding homes and fifty by 
Mothers Aid. Case work service was made available to 1107 
children. This was made possible through loyalty of the Baptist 
denomination and other friends who month by month and at 
Thanksgiving time give to the support of these children in keep- 
ing with the will of the Master. Year after year we are more 
conscious that the method of supporting the orphanage through 
once a month and Thanksgiving offerings is a wise Christian pol- 
icy. In addition to cash offerings, the orphanage at all times can 
use canned goods and other commodities needed for the daily sup- 
port of a large family. 

Once more we pledge our support to this institution that is 
dedicated to the one task of making strong, clean, Christian 
men and women out of boys and girls under our care. 

Angier $ 82.50 

Antioch 401.30 

Baptist Chapel 53.58 



20 LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 

Baptist Grove 120.12 

Bethel 18.21 

Broadway 146.00 

*Buies' Creek 332.25 

^Chalybeate Springs 423.02 

Coats 125.23 

Cumberland Union .00 

*Dunn 1st 1069.32 

Duncan Chapel 39.76 

*East Erwin 96.98 

Dunn 2nd 26.00 

Erwin 341.90 

Friendship 76.51 

Harmony 153.00 

*Holly Springs 321.02 

Kennebec 27.37 

*Lillington 286.40 

Layton's Chapel 5.00 

Macedonia 55.00 

Neill's Creek 93.36 

Oak Grove 41.32 

Piney Grove 127.90 

Pleasant Grove 17.16 

Pleasant Memory 29.00 

Swann's Station 66.07 

Rawls 100.00 

TOTAL 1947 $4,675.36 

TOTAL 1946 $3,631.05 

Income $1,044.31 

Recommendations 

1. That all churches make a monthly offering so that the 
children may be kept before us throughout the year. 

2. That greater preparations be made for a larger Thanks- 
giving offering. 

3. That the churches be more active in building Christian 
homes. 

37. The second recommendation of the Executive Com- 
mittee was that Rev. M. E. Sliger, now Educational Director of 
the Waughtown Baptist Church, be employed as our Mis- 
sionary. This motion passed. 

38. The third recommendation of the Executive Com- 
mittee was that these minutes be dedicated to Mrs. D. B. 
Andrews for her excellent work in the Association, especially 
as President of the Associational W. M. S. This motion also 
passed. 



LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 21 

39. The fourth recommendation of the Executive Com- 
mittee v/as that the Association look with favor upon a cam- 
paign to raise $50,000.00 for education within the next three 
years and that this money be divided 50-50 between Wake For- 
est and Campbell Colleges. Passed. 

40. The Vice-Moderator, Brother Hudson, took the 
chair for the election of a Moderator. Brother Campbell v/as 
nominated and elected unanimously. 

41. Brother Turner moved that the other present offi- 
cers be elected by acclamation. Motion passed. Sam Hudson, 
Lillington, was thereby elected Vice-Moderator and Harry D. 
Wood, Jr., Angier, Clerk. 

42. The Treasurer's Report was presented and adopted 
as follows: 

TREASURER'S REPORT 

RECEIPTS: 

Bal. on hand 10-31-46 $102.23 

Angier 300.61 

Antioch 260.00 

Baptist Chapel 8.00 

Baptist Grove 25.62 

Bethel 7.47 

Broadway 12.00 

Buies Creek 220.00 

Chalybeate Springs 114.00 

Coats 105.00 

Cumberland Union 151.89 

Dunn, First 589.07 

Dunn, Second 15.00 

Erwin, East 55.00 

Erwin, First , 150.00 

Friendship 57.50 

Harmony 35.00 

Holly Springs 34.00 

Kennebec 9.50 

Layton's Chapel 15.14 

Lillington 167.50 

Macedonia 30.00 

Neills Creek 55.00 

Oak Grove 20.62 

Piney Grove 19.50 

Pleasant Memory 26.00 

Rawls 20.00 



22 LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 

Swann's Station 15.00 

Baptist State Convention 500.00 

$3120.65 
DISBURSEMENTS: 

H. D. Wood, Jr., Clerk $ 50.00 

Zula Rogers, Nov 160.00 

Zula Rogers 65.00 

M. A. Huggins, retirement 14.00 

Zula Rogers, Dec 225.00 

Zula Rogers, Jan 225.00 

Zula Rogers, Feb 219.10 

Zula Rogers, March 230.90 

Theo. Davis Sons printing Minutes 119.00 

M. A. Huggins, ret. '47 84.00 

Zula Rogers, April 225.00 

Zula Rogers, May 192.64 

Zula Rogers, June 226.96 

M. A. Huggins, Bethel 2.47 

Sc?iool Supply Co 11.94 

Zula Rogers 30.40 

L. E. Johnson, stamps 5.00 

Zula Rogers, July 211.98 

Zula Rogers 13.02 

Zula Rogers, August 141.00 

Zula Rogers 84.00 

Zula Rogers, September 200.00 

L. E. Johnson, stamps 3.00 

Zula Rogers 25.00 

M. A. Huggins for Cumberland Union 95.89 



$2860.30 
Balance on hand 10-27-47 $260.35 



$3120.65 
All bank statements, etc., are on the clerk's desk for your ex- 
amination. Feel free to consult them! 

All bills have been paid to this date. Our participation in the 
Baptist Employees Retirement Flan has been paid in full through 
Dec. 30, 1947. All money has been deposited in the First Citizens 
Bank and Trust Co. of Angler, N. C. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Harry D. Wood, Jr., Treas. 

Angier, N. C, Oct. 27, 1947 

43. Brother Turner, Pastor of Neill's Creek Church, 
was recognized to offer his thanks to the Association for its 



LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 23 

help in rebuilding their meeting house which was destroyed 
by fire last year. 

44. Brother G. W. BuUard was recognized to speak for 
the Biblical Recorder. Mrs. Harvey O'Quinn presented the re- 
port which was adopted as follows: 

REPORT ON RELIGIOUS LITERATURE 

Baptists have compelling reasons for giving major attention 
to religious literature. We believe in personal responsibility and 
voluntary action. This makes imperative spiritual knowledge, 
an enlightened conscience, moral convictions, and intelligent 
comprehension of the issues of our times. Again, we are inevita- 
bly involved in a raging war, the war of ideas. There is cease- 
less struggle between the ideas of totalitarianism and democra- 
cy, collectivism and free enterprise, authoritarianism and free- 
dom, extreme nationalism and sane internationalism, secular- 
ism and spiritual values, formalism and faith, works and grace, 
the kingdom of Satan and the kingdom of Christ. 

The printed prage is the chief medium of this warfare of 
ideas. And the welfare of humanity depends on the ideas which 
control the world. The forces of evil are exploiting the field of 
literature with ingenious, organized, and concentrated power. 
The antidote for this peril is the propagation of truth, the truth 
of Christianity. Baptists must awake to the urgent values of re- 
ligious literature in the fulfilment of their mission. 

The Sunday School Board publishes sixty periodicals. They 
are designed to encourage Bible study, to lead to personal faith 
in Christ, to cultivate Christian character and consecration, to 
develop faithful workers and skillful leaders in our churches, and 
to motivate worthy participation in the cause of world redemption. 
The combined circulation of these periodicals in 1946 was 28,- 
986,851. 

Then we have our ov/n state publication of the BIBLICAL RE- 
CORDER. The Baptist State Convention of North Carolina, or- 
ganized in 1830, has as its purpose, according to the constitu- 
tion, the promotion of "Missions, education, social service, and 
the distribution of the Bible and sound religious literature. It was 
not an accident that the Biblical Recorder was founded in 1833, 
just three years later. The founding fathers realized that the peo- 
ple did not, and could not advance beyond the information which 
they had. That was true then and is equally true today. Secre- 
tary M. A. Huggins says: "A study of the minutes of the Conven- 
tion will show that almost without exception there is a direct re- 
lationship between the number of Recorder subscribers in any 
church and the support which that church gives to missions, ed- 
ucation, and benevolence." The present circulation of the Re- 



24 LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 

corder is around 45,000, which means a net gain for the past 
twelve months of approximately 7,000. In Little River Associa- 
tion we have 18 churches with Recorder Clubs. 

SUBSCRIPTIONS 

Angier-Everj^ family 151 Erwin 15 

Antioch 34 Friendship 22 

Baptist Grove 10 Harmony 5 

Broadway 8 Holly Springs 17 

Buies Creek, Every fam 155 Kennebec 8 

Chalybeate Springs 14 Lillington 53 

Coats-Every family 73 Neills Creek 16 

Dunn, Second 12 Oak Grove 5 

Dunn, First 90 Swann's Station 9 

The purpose of our Baptist literature is to present Christ in 
the breadth, radiance, magnetism and majesty of His divine 
personality; to lead our people to know the truth, practice the 
truth, propagate the truth; and to meet the needs of the people 
in the churches so far as literature is concerned; so that togeth- 
er we may work for the fulfilment of Christ's Kingdom on the 
earth. 

Respectfully submitted, 
Mrs. H. M. O'Quinn 

45. The session closed for supper. Brother Joe Mack 
Long, pastor of Coats Church led the closing prayer. 

EVENING SESSION 

Vice-Moderator Sam Hudson, presiding. Rev. Joe Mack 
Long, acting Clerk. 

46. The evening session opened with the singing of 
"Come, Thou Fount of Every Blessing" and "Stand Up, Stand 
Up For Jesus. Brother Forrest Maxwell led in prayer. 

47. Brother M. M. Jernigan presented the report on 
Temperance and Social Evils which was adopted as follows: 

REPORT ON TEMPERANCE AND SOCIAL EVILS 

In a recent article entitled "Alcoholic Alcoholism" by James 
K. Hall, M. D., Associate editor of the Southern Medical Sur- 
gery and President of Westbrook Sanatarium of Richmond, Va., 
Dr. Hall has this to say, and I quote him in part: "Alcohol as a 
factor in criminal behaviour is a story of daily reiteration here in 
Virginia and probably in all other states. Both newspapers of 
Richmond have lately been discussing the great increase in crime 



LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 25 

with special reference to so-called drunkenness as a criminal con- 
dition. 

The Social Service Bureau of the City of Richmond places 
Alcoholism, in parents, at the top of the list of the causes of the 
neglect of children. The deduction is, that Alcoholism may be 
the cause of the commission of crime by the individual and that 
it may also lead through poverty and squalor and deficient nutri- 
tion and by general deprivation to criminality in others. 

Some of the principal official dignitaries of the Commonwealth 
of Virginia have become so unhappy because of the increase of 
drunkenness that they are discussing seriously and scientifically 
the advisability of providing a great state institution for the treat- 
ment of inebriety. Much has been said about what Alcoholism is; 
what its causes are, and how the condition should be treated. 
But neither by the scientists nor by the newspaper editors is much 
said about the imbibation of alcohol as the cause of Alcoholism. 
The Alcoholic, so they say, is a poorly adjusted psychopathic in- 
dividual. He is scarcely thought of as a citizen of the state kept 
chronically poisoned by a toxic substance sold to him, by his 
own government, for the purpose of getting from him, the rev- 
enue derived from the sale of this poison stuff, through taxes. 
Federal and state officials, and newspaper editors whose pages 
carry advertisements of alcoholic beverages, do not speak in dis- 
approval of the sale, by the government, of alcoholic beverages. 

Yet, in preventive medicine the scientific practice is, when 
the cause of the disease is found, to destroy the cause. If that 
cannot be done, every effort is made to erect barriers to pro- 
tect man against the causes of disease. Health agencies do not 
try to eradicate typhoid fever and diphtheria and tuberculosis 
and malaria and syphillis by increasing the causitive factors of 
these diseases and by making these germs and parasites more 
easily available to the people. Every attempt, is made, per con- 
tra, by sanitary agencies to lessen the likelihood of ingestion by 
the people of any substance, germs, parasites, contaminated 
water, and poison in general, that will be harmful to the peo- 
ple's health. The operation, by the government, of saloons or 
A. B. C. stores, merely as tax gathering stations constitutes an in- 
tolerable insult to preventive medicine. 

According to a report of the United States Department of Com- 
merce, America spent a record $8,700,000,000 on whiskey, beer 
and wine in 1946. This constitutes an average of $89.00 for each 
person 18 years of age and older. 

In North Carolina, during the year 1946, we sold through 
A. B. C. Stores in the 25 liquor counties, alcoholic beverages in 
the amount of $80,154,467,23. To break this down just a little, 
we have these startling figures: Sales each second, $8.92; Each 
minute $535.21; Each hour $32,113.16; Each 8 hour day $256,- 



26 LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 

905.34; Each 26 day month $6,675,538.93. The result: crowded 
court dockets with all sorts of cases; Divorces, Murders, As- 
saults, Sex crimes, Larceny, Drunkenness, Drunken driving and 
all sorts of kindred offences. A prominent judge recently said 
that 80 per cent of our crime was coming directly or indirectly from 
the use of alcohol and drunkenness. Our County Jails, Our State 
Prison. Our Mental Institutions are overcrowded with inmates 
furnishea by or as a result of liquor. 

Let's contrast these conditions with the conditions in the 
State of Kansas, a pioneer state in the cause of prohibition. Kan- 
sas is made the butt of many jokes because of its dry attitude. It 
is no joke, however, v/hat Kansas has reaped as a result of its 
bone-dry law. In Kansas there are 54 counties without any in- 
sane; 54 counties without feeble-minded; 96 counties without any 
poorhouses; 53 counties without any person in jail; and 56 coun- 
ties without any representative in the state penitentiary. Quoted 
from Christian Observer. 

With these facts before us, we should call on all persons in- 
terested in good morals, sobriety and temperance, to use their 
influence against the manufacture, sale and use of intoxicating 
liquor in any form, in that our County and State may be dry in 
fact as well as in name. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Mack M. Jernigan, Dunn, N. C. 

Brother S. Lewis Morgan, Jr. spoke briefly on the Tith- 
ing Program of Southern Baptists and of the excellent results 
observed in the Lillington and Erwin First churches. 

49. Brother Truby Powell gave the Training Union Re- 
port which was adopted as follows: 

REPORT OF THE BAPTIST TRAINING UNION 

During the last associational year we have had several meet- 
ings of distinct importance. Our first was our Mass Meeting last 
December; at that time we met with the Lillington Baptist Church 
and Rev. A. C. McCall was our chief speaker for the occasion. 
Many of you that were present will recall that he emphasized 
that the individual must use his own talents, do his or her part 
in this task of building a strong Training Union. 

The Associational Director was privileged to be in the Coats 
Baptist Church on the night of January 5th at which time these 
fine people led by Pastor and Mrs. Long reorganized their Training 
program. 

During the summer we held another Associational Mass meet- 
ing which was well attended. Rev. S. L. Morgan, Jr., of Dunn 
was the principal speaker for this meeting and he stresssed vig- 



LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 27 

orously the need for training in our churches. Also, during the 
summer The Antioch Baptist Training Union gave a demonstra- 
tion program at Piney Grove and from the demonstration we saw 
emerge one Junior, one Intermediate, one Young People's and one 
Adult Training Union. 

An Executive meeting was held in Lillington at which tim-e 
Mr. Harvey T. Gibson, State Training Union Director, attended. 

On October 12th another Associational Mass Meeting was 
held with the Lillington Church. Rev. Forrest Maxwell was the 
principal speaker at this time and used as his subject "Our All On 
The Altar." 

We point with pride to our part in the Regional Training 
Union Convention that was held in Clayton last April. Our As- 
sociation won out in several of the contests and we were grate- 
ful for having such talent in our midst — not stopping here some 
of our contestants went even further — to Ridgecrest where some 
of them attained further honors for themselves for their churches 
and most of all for the Kingdom of God. 

During the past year our Training Unions have grown some — 
not enough however; and we are inclined to quote Rev. A. C. 
McCall with regards to this, "I wish that I could impress upon 
your minds and hearts the importance of this Training program 
for our churches. That we v/ould resolve to organize a Training 
Union in the church where there is none and to dedicate what tal- 
ents we have in making the Training Union in our church more 
helpful." 

Your former director wishes to express his appreciation for 
those officers of the Associational Training Union who have work- 
ed so well with him during the past year and to pledge his help 
to the nev/ director as he or she is elected to this position. 
Respectfully submitted, 
George W. Williams 

50. Brother J. A. McLeod presented the Report on Our 
Colleges which was adopted as follows: 

REPORT ON OUR COLLEGES 

When our Colleges are mentioned the word that com.es to 
our mind is "confusion." 

When the war ended most of the men who had gone into 
the Military Service from our Colleges came back as they receiv- 
ed their discharges to complete their courses. In the meantime 
more boys and girls were graduating from high schools and enter- 
ing College. Beginning in 1946 we have had a veritable deluge of 
students overflowing our campuses. We were not prepared for 
them. Living quarters were and are still inadequate, classroom 



28 LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 

facilities are insufiicient, adequate teaching force is not availa- 
ble. 

The Reynolds gift to Wake Forest College has made uncer- 
tain the future of our junior colleges as individual units. They 
are unable to make plans for the future. However, we are grad- 
ually finding our way out of the confusion. The Supreme Court 
has held that the Reynolds gift is legal and it has been definitely 
decided that Wake Forest will move to Winston-Salem. It is hoped 
that something definite will be done about the disposition of the 
present Wake Forest plant at an early date. 

In the midst of this confusion another word naturally comes 
to mind and that word is "opportunity." Never before have the 
Baptists of North Carolina had so great an opportunity. The youth 
of our state and many from other states are knocking at the doors 
of our Colleges. These Colleges were established and are main- 
tained for the primary purpose of promoting and furnishing Chris- 
tian education. The young men and women are in greater num- 
bers than ever before presenting themselves for this training and 
we must not fail them. If our denomination is to fulfill its mis- 
sion we must not only train preachers to pastor our churches and 
carry the message of Christ to other fields, but we must have 
trained laymen in our chiu'ches to aid and support the work. The 
success of any church depends upon the combined and cooperative 
efforts of the pastor and active members of that church. Our Col- 
leges should turn out many of these active members. For our Col- 
leges to function most efficiently we must become more person- 
ally interested in them and give them wholehearted support. 
This report might be summed up in these words: 

Status — Confusion 

Outlook — Unprecedented opportunity 

Command — Seize the opportunity and in God's name go for- 
ward 

Respectfully submitted, 
J. A. McLeod 

51. The Convention Program for Wake Forest was dis- 
cussed by Brother S. L. Morgan, Jr., Associational Chairman 
for the Wake Forest program. See paragraph 39. 

52. The Vice-Moderator presented the report from Dun- 
can Chapel Sunday School and asked that it be inserted in 
the minutes as follows: 

DUNCAN CHAPEL REPORT 

From Duncan Chapel Sunday School 

Number enrolled 90 

Average Attendance 45 



LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 29 

Number enrolled Bible School 60 

Average Attendance 55 

Total Contributions $272.12 

DISBURSEMENTS 

Literature $ 48.28 

Church Expenses 18.00 

Pastors Salary 100.72 

Thomasville Op 31.44 

Love Offering 38.95 

Total Disbursements $237.39 

In Treasury Sunday School 14.79 

Love Offering 19.94 

Building Fund $220.28 

Pastor, Rev. Charlie Gray 
Supt. L. V. Pegram 

53. The Campbell College Choral Group rendered the 
following selections: "Bless the Lord, O My Soul" and 
''Beautiful Saviour." 

54. Dr. Eugene Olive, of Wake Forest, was presented 
who brought an address on Christian Education with the em- 
phasis on Wake Forest College. 

55. The Association sang the first stanza of "Blest Be 
The Tie That Binds" and was adjourned after the benediction 
by Brother Raymond Moore. 

AUXILIARY MEETINGS 
None were reported to the clerk. 



30 LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



OUR BELOVED DEAD 

ANTIOCH— Mr. Dennis O'Quinn, Mrs. Dennis O'Quinn, Mr. John 
Moore, Mrs. S. G. Davis, Mrs. E. C. Thornas, Mrs. Hester A. 
Yarboro, Mr. Willie Holder, Mr. Charlie Mills 

BAPTIST GROVE— Mr. B. F. Griffin 

BROADWAY— Mrs. Mollie C. Thomas, Mr. Emory Sloan 

BUIES CREEK — Mrs. John Almon Stewart, Mr. John W. Greg- 
ory, Cpl. Brenton C. Page, Mr. Kernie Monroe Lloyd 

CHALYBEATE SPRINGS— Mrs. Leola S. Oakley, Mr. R. A. 
Matthews, Mr. West Horton, Mr. J. L. Smith 

COATS — Mrs. Bitha Hill, Mr. Charles Beasley, Mr. George 
Thomas Smith 

CUMBERLAND UNION— Mr. John Brown, Deacon 

DUNN, FIRST— Miss Ha Jernigan, Mrs. W. J. Hodges, Mrs. 
Natalie Guy Skibb, Mr. S. E. Guy, Mrs. Ida Jones, Mrs. 
Sam Ausley, Mr. Eghert Barefoot, Mr. Luther Jackson 

ERWIN, FIRST— Mr. Frank Lovick 

FRIENDSHIP— Mrs. F. T. Byrd 

HARMONY— Mr. J. W. Adams 

HOLLY SPRINGS— Mr. Leshe Womack 

KENNEBEC— Mrs Lina F. Mills 

LAYTON'S CHAPEL— Mrs. Hattie Butts 

LILLINGTON— Mrs. W. T. Hockaday, Mr. Charles Raredon 

MACEDONIA — Mrs. Sallie Champion, Mrs. Sara C. Ashworth, 
Mrs. Evie Austin, Miss Etta Weathers, Mr. Alton Nash 

NEILLS CREEK— Mrs. Callie Jones, Miss Delia Matthews, Mr. 
Mack Matthews 

PINEY GROVE— Mrs. Mary S. Honeycutt, Mrs. Emma Whit- 
tington 

RAWLS — Mr. W. L. Whittington, Deacon; Mrs. A. D. Goodwin, 
Miss Mary Eliza Sherman 



LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 31 

Ordained Ministers Who Are Not Pastors 

Rev. J. F. Blackmon Buie's Creek 

Rev. J. E. Ayscue Buie's Creek 

Rev. I. K. Stafford Buie's Creek 

Rev. Claude White Buie's Creek 

Rev. Charles Howard Buie's Creek 

Rev. Emmett Sawyer Buie's Creek 

Rev. George Swann Buie's Creek 

Rev. Henry Morgan Wake Forest 

Rev. R. F. Hall „ Lillington 

Rev. Lester Mann Rt. 4, Durham 

Rev. W. F. Campbell Rt. 2, Fuquay Springs 

Educational Directors 

Miss Josephine Hughes, Dunn, First Dunn 

Ministers Ordained This Year 

Rev. Henry Morgan, Harmony Wake Forest 

Students for the Ministry 

Angel Aguilera, Buie's Creek Campbell College 

Randall Adams, Buie's Creek Campbell College 

Guilford Daugherty, Buie's Creek Campbell College 

Eugene Ensley, Buie's Creek Campbell College 

Emory Holden, Buie's Creek Campbell College 

Hovie Pope, Buie's Creek Campbell College 

Bill Scott, Buie's Creek Campbell College 

Sherrill Stevens, Buie's Creek Campbell College 

Alpheus Stallings, Buie's Creek Campbell College 

Warren Turner, Buie's Creek Campbell College 

Thomas D. Welch, Buie's Creek Campbell College 

George Waddell, Wake Forest Wake Forest College 

Tom White, Buie's Creek Campbell College 

Thomas Faircloth, Erwin Wake Forest 

Choir Directors or Song Leaders 

Angler Mrs. Harry D. Wood, Jr Angler 

Antioch Henry Patterson Mamers 

Bethel Leland Matthews Rt. 1, Linden 

Broadway H. A. Thomas Broadway 

Buie's Creek Rev. Claude White Buie's Creek 

Chalybeate Springs ....T. L. Caviness Rt. 1, Fuquay Spgs. 

Coats Mrs. J. H. Fleming Coats 

Cumberland Union ....J. O. Weathers Rt. 2, Fuquay Spgs. 

Dunn, First Ms. C. C. Upchurch Dunn 

Dunn, Second ..B. O. Slaughter Rt. 1, Dunn 

Erwin, East W. C. Stone Erwin 

Erwin, First Mrs. D. C. Woodall Erwin 



32 LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 

Friendship Mrs. Archibald Byrd Bunnlevel 

Harmony H. S. Hedgpeth Rt, 1, Bunnlevel 

Holly Springs Leary Knight Broadway 

Kennebec N. S. McLean Rt. 1, Coats 

Layton's Chapel Hartwell Butts Bunnlevel 

Lillington Mrs. Ruth Brown Lillington 

Macedonia Leo Weathers Rt. 1, Holly Spgs. 

Neill's Creek L. G. Johnson Rt. 2, Angier 

Oak Grove Dewey Pate Rt. 2, Angier 

Piney Grove W. L. Norris Rt. 1, Holly Spgs. 

Pleasant Memory Lloyd Hallovv^ay 

Rawls Henry Rawls Rt. 1, Fuquay Spgs. 

Swann's Station H. W. Graham Rt. 1, Jonesboro 

Pianist or Organist 

Angier Mrs. Marshall Morgan Angier 

Antioch Miss Magie Stewart Lillington 

Bethel Mrs. Oilie Matthews Manchester 

Baptist Grove Miss Hilda Mae Lee Rt. 1, Fuquay Spgs. 

Broadway Mrs. Dellethe Woodall Broadway 

Buie's Creek Mrs. A. E. Lynch Buie's Creek 

Chalybeate Spgs Mrs. W. M. Pearson Chalybeate Spgs. 

Coats Mrs. C. G. Fuquay Coats 

Cumberland Union ....Mrs. Thomas Sears Rt. 1, Fuquay Spgs. 

Dunn, First .Mrs. C. C. Upchurch Dunn 

Dunn, Second Mrs. Marie Godwin Dunn 

Erwin, East Mrs. Kathleen Barefoot Rt. 1, Erwin 

Erwin, First Miss Janet Byrd Erwin 

Friendship Mrs. W. G. Massengill Rt. 1, Erwin 

Harmony Mrs. G. R. Souders Lillington 

Holly Springs Miss Bessie McNeill Broadway 

Kennebec Mrs. EUie Dickens Rt. 1, Varina 

Layton's Chapel Mrs.W.N.Shaw Manchester 

Lillington Mrs. Joe Long Lillington 

Macedonia Miss Lena Weathers Rt. 1, Holly Spgs. 

Neill's Creek Mrs. Alyda Smith Rt. 2, Angier 

Oak Grove Mrs. A^da Denton Rt. 1, Lillington 

Piney Grove Miss Joyce Adcock Rt. 1, Holly Spgs. 

Pleasant Memory Mrs. Carhe McLamb Rt. 1, Coats 

Rawls Miss Marie Jones Rt. 1, Fuquay Spgs. 

Swann's Station Mrs. W. B. Castlebury Rt. 1, Jonesboro 

Librarians 

Antioch Miss Hazel Weaver Lillington 

Dunn, First Miss Josephine Hughes Dunn 

Dunn, Second Miss Margie Creech Rt. 1, Dunn 

Holly Springs Miss Ruth Patterson Broadway 

Swann's Station Miss Daisy Coleman Rt. 1, Jonesboro 



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LITTLE RIVER 

BAPTIST 
ASSOCIATION 

North Carolina 

Seventy-Third Annual Session 

Meeting With 

MACEDONIA BAPTIST CHURCH 

October 26th, 1 948 



The next regular session of the Association will meet with 

the Rawls Baptist Church Tuesday after the 

fourth Sunday in October 1949 

Annual sermon will be preached by Rev. E. C. Keller 
Rev. J. M. Long, Alternate 



LITTLE RIVER 

BAPTIST 
ASSOCIATION 

North Carolina 

Seventy-Third Annual Session 

Meeting With 

MACEDONIA BAPTIST CHURCH 

October 26th, 1 948 



The next regular session of the Association will meet with 

the Rawls Baptist Church Tuesday after the 

fourth Sunday in October 1949 

Annual sermon will be preached by Rev. E. C. Keller 
Rev. J. M. Long, Alternate 



LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



INDEX 



ASSOCIATIONAL DIRECTORY . ..: 5 

ASSISTANT PASTORS OR EDUCATIONAL DIRECTORS 28 

CHOIR DIRECTORS - 29 

CHURCH DIRECTORIES 28 

CONSTITUTION _____ .._ _ 10 

HISTORICAL TABLE BEGINS 36 

OUR BELOVED DEAD _ ____ 27 

ORDAINED MINISTERS __ _ _ _ 28 

LICENSED MINISTERS : ...J 28 

LIBRARIANS _ _ 30 

LIST OF MESSENGERS _ 8 

PROCEEDINGS ...'. ___ _ 12 

PIANISTS OR ORGANISTS ___ ......29 

STATISTICAL TABLES BEGIN _ __, .__ _ .......SI 

STUDENTS FOR THE MINISTRY ___ _____ _._ 29 

REPORTS 

AMERICAN BIBLE SOCIETY ....t.... ...-24' 

ASSOCIATIONAL MISSIONARY _ _ 14 

BAPTIST TRAINING UNION 19 

DUNCAN BAPTIST CHURCH __ 26 

MISSIONS AT HOME AND ABROAD .._ ___ _ 16 

MINISTERIAL RELIEF ..........23 

MODERATOR'S REPORT ___ ...! ...20 

RELIGIOUS LITERATURE 25 

RESOLUTIONS COMMITTEE 21 

SUNDAY SCHOOL _ _ ___ •...._ _ 18 

TREASURER'S REPORT .:J._ __.„...:..____. .:.;....: ■:...... __.22 

WOMAN'S MISSIONARY UNION 17 




LESLIE HARTWELL CAMPBELL 

These minutes of the Seventy-third annual session of the Little 
River Baptist Association are dedicated to our Moderator, President 
Leslie Hartwell Campbell, of Campbell College. Professor Leslie has 
served twelve years as our Moderator. His service to this association 
and in the field of education has brought to him a position of promi- 
nence in the life of Campbell College, the churches, his community, 
the denomination, and the entire state. 

His spirit of sacrifice and compassion, of love and loyalty, of 
intellectual thirst and integrity have combined to make him a use- 
ful disciple of the Master. May God shower his blessings on him 
and the causes with which Brother Campbell is identified. 



LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 5 

DIRECTORY 
of The Association 

1. GENERAL OFFICERS OF THE ASSOCIATION 

Moderator L. H. Campbell, Buies Creek 

Vice-Moderator Sam Hudson, Lillington 

Clerk-Treasurer Harry D. Wood, Jr., Angler 

2. EXECUTIVE BOARD MEMBERS 

Moderator L. H. Campbell, Buies Creek 

Vice-Moderator Sam Hudson, Lillington 

Clerk-Treasurer Harry D. Wood, Jr., Angier 

S. S. Superintendent Raymond E. Moore, Mamers 

B. T. U. Director L. L. Coats, Dunn 

W. M. U. President Mrs. D. B. Andrews, Fuquay Springs 

Supt. of Evangelism G. Scott Turner, Chalybeate Springs 

Missionary Roger C. Johnson, Lillington 

W. H. Stephenson Angier 

C. D. Bain Dunn 

J. M. Long Coats 

Forrest Maxwell Erwin 

3. ASSOCIATIONAL MISSIONARY 

Mr. Roger C. Johnson Lillington 

4. OFFICERS OF ASSOCIATIONAL W. M. U. 

Superintendent Mrs. D. B. Andrews, Fuquay Springs 

Associate Supt Mrs. Beulah Dula, Chalybeate Springs 

Secretary-Treasurer Mrs. Berles Johnson, Lillington 

Young People's Leader Mrs. Robert Young, Angier 

Literature Chairman Mrs. L. Jackson, Erwin 

Mission Study Chairman 

Community Missions Mrs. C. R. Ammons, Lillington 

Stewardship Chairman Miss Lillian Draughon, Dunn 

Margaret Fund Chm Mrs. L. B. Smith, Fuquay Springs 

White Cross Chm Mrs. J. M. Long, Coats 

Royal Ambassador Counselor Rev. S. L. Morgan, Jr., Dunn 

Training School Chairman Mrs. Raymond Moore, Mamers 



6 LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 

5. OFFICERS OF ASSOCIATIONAL SUNDAY 
SCHOOL 

Superintendent R. E. Moore, Mamers 

Supt. Emeritus ..'....!.... G. G. Page, Buies Creek 

Supt. Enlargement... .Rev. J. M. Long, Coats 

Supt. Training Mr. Haywood Howell, Kipling 

Supt. Evangelism G. Scott Turner, Chalybeate Springs 

Supt. V. B. S Mr. Irvin Stephens, Lillington, Rt. 2 

General S^xrf^t-iry.... ...Mrs. R. E. Moore, Mamers 

Supt. Extension Dept Mrs. Leslie Turlington, Buies Creek 

Supt. Adult Dept.. Mr. L. Jackson, Erwin 

Supt. Young People Dept...... Mr. J. H. Blackmon, Lillington 

Supt. Intermediate Dept Mrs. R. A. Duncan^ Dunn 

Supt. Junior Dept Mrs. L K. Stafford, Buies Creek 

Supt. Primary Dept... Miss Mamie Haigwood, Lillington 

Supt. Beginner Dept ..Mrs. Geo. Souders, Lillington, Rt. 2 

Supt. Cradle Roll Dept Mrs. H. M. O'Quinn, Mamers 

Supt. Nursery Dept.. Mrs. C. L. Guy, Dunn 

Group Leaders: 

Northern Mr. Hollis Fowler, Fuquay Springs, Rt. 1 

Eastern Dr. C. D. Bain, Dunn 

Southern Mr. Geo. Souders, Lillington, Rt. 2 

Western.. -. Mr. Titus Rogers, Mamers 

6. OFFICERS ASSOCIATIONAL B. T. U. 

Director L. L. Coats, Dunn 

Asso. Director ...M. O. Phillips, Coats 

Secretary .....Miss Juanita Hasty, Eirwin 

Chorister. ...W. L. Thames, Dunn 

Pianist _ Marjorie Stewart 

Pastor Advisor A. C. McCall, Bunnlevel 

Adult Leader , Miss Lillian Draughon, Dunn 

Young People's Leader Jl>uby Powell, Lillington 

Intermediate Leader Mrs. E. L. Powell, Mamers 

Junior Leader Miss Bessie McNeill, Broadway 

Story Hour Leader Mrs. G. R. Connor, Kipling 



LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 7 

Hymn Festival Leader.... W. L. Thames, Dunn 

Group Leaders: 

Northern W. E. Medlin, Holly Springs, Rt. 2 

Eastern _.....-..,.......... O. W. Pulley, Erwin 

Soiithern Julius Holloway, Lillington 

Western , — Miss Rima Knight 

7. OFFICERS OF ASSOCIATIONAL BROTHERHOOD 

Write J. W. Byrd, Lillington, Rt. 3 

8. STANDING COMMITTEES 

Presbytery .. 

S. L. Morgan, Jr., Dunn 

R. E. Moore, Mamers r . ■ . 

Forest .Maxwell, Erwin 

Sam Hudson, Lillington 

Chm. 'on Christian Literature Mrs. L. Jackson, Erwin 

Chm. on Or^^hanage..:.. Mrs. Leslie Pittman, Broadway 

Chm. on Missions ..Miss Mattie Bain, Coats 

Chm. on Temperance A. C. McCall, Bunnlevel 

Chm. on Baptist Hospital Leary Knight, Broadway 

chm. on Ministers Annuities Mrs. J. G. Layton, Lillington 

Chm. on Christian Education E. C. Keller, Dunn 

9. OFFICERS OF BOARDS AND INSTITUTIONS 

L. H. Campbell, President, Campbell College, Buies Creek. 

S. L. Morgan, Jr., member, N. C. Council on Christian Educa- 
tion, Dunn. 

Harry D. Wopd,. Jr., member, Executive Committee of the 
General Board of the Baptist State Convention.. 

10. CALENDAR OF ACTIVITIES 

Mr. Roger Johnson having just assumed his work as our As- 
sociational Mission Worker, no calendar was presented for 
adoption. 



8 LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 

LIST of MESSENGERS 

ANGIER C. W. Flowers, James Flowers, Mrs. W. H. Stephen- 
son, Mrs. Wm. Morgan, Mrs. Rellie Barbour. 

ANTIOCH Erwin Stephens, Mrs. Erwin Stephens, Mrs. M. 

M. Jernigan, Aaron Rogers, Mrs. R. E. Moore. 

BAPTIST CHAPEL John Howard, J. M. Dickens, A. L. 

Smith, Roy Thomas, Roland Howard. 

BAPTIST GROVE C. J. Mills, Henry Howell, W. E. Har- 
dee, B. W. Wester, I. L. Howell. 

BETHEL Mrs. H. W. Blalock, Mrs. Gertie Matthews, Mrs. 

Eloise Raynor, Miss Ruth West, Miss Annie Mae Elmore. 

BROADWAY L. E. Pittman, W. M. Thomas, G. S. Stone, 

Owen Taylor, Mrs. Earnie Smith. 

BUIES CREEK Wilbur Gregory, L. H. Campbell, Mrs. T. T. 

Lanier, Herman McLamb, Harvey Humphrey. 

CHALYBEATE SPRINGS Mrs. Rob. Wells, Mrs. D. B. An- 
drews, E. W. Smith, Mrs. G. R. Conner, Mrs. D. H. Senter. 

COATS Miss Mattie Bain, Mrs. J. R. Butler, Mrs. Exie Smith, 

Owen Odum, Victor Lee. 
CUMBERLAND UNION J. O. Weathers, Mrs. Cornelia Ab- 

ernathy, Mrs. Ralph Clark, Mrs. Thomas Sears, Millard 

Holland. 
DUNN, FIRST Mrs. R. A. Duncan, Mrs. Alvis Langdon, C. 

D. Bain, Miss Lillian Draughon, J. M. Morgan. 
DUNN, SECOND Mrs. Derwood Godwin, M. B. Faircloth, 

D. E. Dawson. 
ERWIN, EAST W. J. Davis, Herbert McLamb, W. C. Stone, 

Mrs. Eula Moore, Mrs. Herbert McLamb. 
ERWIN, FIRST Mrs. L. Jackson, Mrs. Joe Smith, Mrs. Forest 

Maxwell, Wilbur Tyson, Harvey Bass. 
FRIENDSHIP F. M. Allen, C. A. Strickland, Mrs. A. F. Jones, 

Mrs. C. A. Strickland, Mrs. W. E. Bethune. 
HARMONY John H. Morgan, E. B. Latta, S. A. Lanier, Mrs. 

John H. Morgan, 'Mrs. E. B. Latta. 



LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 9 

HOLLY SPRINGS G. K. Patterson, D. G. Patterson, R. U. 

McNeill, A. L. Baker, Miss Zula Patterson. 

KENNEBEC M. T. Olive, W. O. McLean, N. T. McLean, W. 

R. Upchurch, C. J. Howard. 

LAYTON'S CHAPEL Not Named. 

LILLINGTON C. J. Bullock, J. E. Womble, Mrs. A. G. Rick- 
man. 

MACEDONIA J. C. Smith, J. C. Holt, J. E. Smith, Leo 

Weathers, Paul O'Connell. 

NEILLS CREEK W. T. Campbell, J. O. McLeod, Mrs. N. A. 

Matthews, Mrs. Hugh Johnson, Mrs. D. D. Johnson. 

OAK GROVE Mrs. Peal Gaskin, J. B. Dupree, Mrs. J. B. Du- 

pree, Mrs. Monnie Avery, Mrs. Nettie Weaver. 

PINEY GROVE 1. L. Howell, R. E. Austin, Mrs. R. E. Austin, 

Mrs. A. S. Austin. 

PLEASANT MEMORY H. C. Ausley, Mrs. H. C. Ausley, 

Marion Penny, Mrs. S. W. Turlington, S. W. Turlington. 

RAWLS Henry Rawls, Foy Gunter, Mrs. Douglas Gardner, 

Linwood Matthews, Thomas Moore. 

SWANNS STATION-E. C. Womack, Mrs. O. E. Womack, Rob- 
ert Godfrey, Mrs. Robert Godfrey, Richard Batchelor. 



10 LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 

CONSTITUTION 



1. This association shall be known as "Little River Baptist 
Association." 

2. The object of this association shall be the advancement of 
the Kingdom of Christ, and the means of accomplishing this shall 
be in strict conformity with the principles of the New Testament. 

3. The association shall have no authority over the internal 
right of any church belonging to it and shall act only as an advisory 
council. 

4. The association shall be composed of messengers chosen 
by the churches connected with it, each church being entitled to 
five delegates. Ordained ministers having oversight of churches 
in the association, or having their membership in these churches, 
shall also be received as messengers. 

5. A quorum shall consist of messengers from a majority of 
the churches of the association. 

6. The delegates from each church to the annual meeting of 
the asosciation shall bear a letter certifying their appointment and 
giving an account of the condition of the church and a statement 
of all funds contributed for local and benevolent purposes. 

7. The officers of the association shall be a moderator, a 
vice-moderator, a clerk and a treasurer, who shall be chosen an- 
nually from the members composing the association, and shall 
continue in office until their successors are elected. The term 
of office of the moderator shall begin at the conclusion of the ses- 
sion at which he is elected and continue until the close of the next 
annual meeting. 

8. It shall be the duty of the moderator to preside during 
the deliberations of the body, to enforce the observance of the 
constitution, preserve the decorum, appoint committes except when 
other provisions are made for their appointment, decide all ques- 
tions of order, giving his opinion on any question under discus- 
sion, and cast the deciding vote in case of a tie. 

9. It shall be the duty of the clerk to record the proceedings 
of each annual meeting of the association, superintend the print- 
ing of the minutes and their distribution among the churches. 

10. It shall be the duty of the treasurer to receive all funds 
sent by the churches or collected during the sessions of this body 
and to disburse the same for the objects stated. He shall present 
a report on all funds administered by him at each annual meeting. 



LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 1 1 

11. The association shall appoint, annually, a Promotion Com- 
mittee composed of one member from each church in the associa- 
tion and the pastors of the churches. The moderator shall be 
chairman of this committee. The function of this committee shall 
be the promotion of Associational plans through the several 
churches. 

12. The association shall appoint annually an Executive Com- 
mittee of 12 members, among whom by virtue of their office are 
to be the moderator, vice-moderator, clerk-treasurer, S. S. Supt. 
of the Association, Training Union Director, W. M. U. Superin- 
tendent, Supt. of Evangelism, the Associational Missionary. This 
committee shall have general supervision of the affairs of the as- 
sociation during the interval between the meetings of the body; 
shall seek to promote the welfare of the churches, and their active 
participation in the causes fostered by the denomination; but shall 
be answerable to the association for its acts, and make an annual 
report to the association of its work. 

13. The association in annual meeting shall appoint a pres- 
bytery of four members to sit with the pastor of any person whose 
ordination is sought, and the moderator of the association, to 
examine the qualifications and opportunities for work of the can- 
didate. 

14. The association shall hold an annual meeting commenc- 
ing on Tuesday after the fourth Sunday in October. 

15. A meeting of the association may be called by the mod- 
erator at any time by the consent of five members of the Exe- 
cutive committee. Each church shall be notified of such a meet- 
ing in time to send delegates. 

16. This association shall have the right to exclude from its 
member, hip any church that departs from New Testament prin- 
ciples. 

17. Any church desiring to become a member of this asso- 
ciation may present a petition at the annual meeting of the body 
through delegates appointed for this purpose. If the association 
shall consent to receive such church the moderator shall extend 
the hand of fellowship to the delegates. 

18. The a.^sociation may invite visitors to seats and extend 
to them all the privileges of delegates except that of voting. 

19. By appointment, at each annual meeting, an introductory 
sermon, and a sermon or address on missions shall be delivered. 

20. This constitution may be amended at any annual ses- 
sion, by a vote of two-thirds of the delegates present, provided 
that notice shall be given before the day that such motion will 
be presented. 



1 2 LITI LE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 

PROCEEDINGS 

MORNING SESSION 

1. The Moderator L. H. Campbell called the Association 
to order at Macedonia Church at 9:30 AM, Oct. 26, 1948. 

2. Brother Julius Holloway was recognized for our open- 
ing period of devotion. 

3. The roll of the churches was called and all were found 
represented except Baptist Chapel and Dunn, Second. 

4. On motion by Brother Sam Hudson those present 
constituted the Seventy-Third Annual Session of the Little 
River Baptist Association. 

5. The following visitors were recognized: G. A. Bain, 
former pastor of Macedonia; Claude Gaddy, Executive Secre- 
tary of the Baptist Council on Christian Education; Earl Brad- 
ley, of the State Mission Board; W. C. Reed, of the Baptist 
Orphanage; and Beverly Lake, of the law school faculty of Wake 
Forest College. 

6. Brother Sam Hudson moved the adoption of a tenta- 
tive program. Passed. 

7. Mrs. Harvey O'Quinn was recognized to conduct the 
Memorial Service. A list of our dead appears after these Pro- 
ceedings. 

8. Brother Sam Hudson was called to the chair and recog- 
nized Brother Leslie H. Campbell for the Moderator's report. 
This report was referred to the Executive Committee. 

9. Brother Raymond E. Moore was recognized for the re- 
port of the Sunday Schools. This report was referred to the 
Executive Committee. 

10. Brother Roger Johnson, our Associational Mission 
Worker, was recognized to present the report on Training Union 
work. This report had been prepared by Truby Powell. This 
report was referred to the Executive Committee. 

11. Brother Claude Gaddy was recognized to present the 
work of our Baptist Colleges. 



LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 13 

12. Dr. Beverly Lake was recognized. He spoke briefly con- 
cerning the need for the interest of every Baptist in our col- 
leges. 

13. The Moderator appointed the following committees: 

Time, Place and Preacher: 

Joe Mack Long, Mrs. Wm. Morgan, Joe Bullock. 

Organizations: 

Roger Johnson, S. L. Morgan, Jr., Owen Odum, 
Mrs. B. P. Marshbanks, R. E. Moore. 

Resolutions: 

Miss Lillian Draughon, Mrs. Forest Maxwell, 
Mrs. R. E. Moore. 

14. Brother Horace Eason, Director of the Convention's 
Program for Wake Forest College, was recognized for a report 
on the progress of this effort. 

15. The Association stood to sing "Blest Be The Tie That 
Binds". 

16. Brother S. L. Morgan, Jr., was recognized to present a 
panel discussion on the subject "Some Essentials in a Model 
Church Program." Those participating were Forrest Maxwell, 
Roger Johnson, A. C. McCall, Joe M. Long. 

17. Miss Marjorie Spence, missionary to South America, 
was recognized. 

18. Greetings were received from Miss Zula Rogers, for- 
merly our Associational Mission Worker, now student at the 
W. M. S. Training School. 

19. Brother A. Paul Bagby being ill. Brother Raymond E. 
Moore was recognized for the Annual Sermon after the singing 
of "How Firm a Foundation". His text was Matthew 27:17-28. 

20. The Benediction constituted our thanks to God for his 
bounty and the session was adjourned for a bountiful dinner 
provided by the Macedonia Church. 

AFTERNOON SESSION 

21. The singing of "Come We That Love The Lord" 
opened the afternoon session of the Association. Brother Joe 



14 LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 

M. Long was acting as clerk in the absence of Harry D. Wood, 

22. Brother R. E. Atkins led in prayer. 

23. Brother Tom White, of Buies Creek, was recognized 
as new pastor of the Pleasant Memory Church. 

24. Brother W. C. Reed brought an inspirational mes- 
sage on the work of the two divisions of our orphanage. 

25. The message from the Baptist Hospital was given by 
Brother McGee, Chaplain at the Hospital. 

26. Brother Roger Johnson was recognized to give his 
report. 

REPORT OF ASSOCIATIONAL MISSIONARY 

From June 1, 1948 to September 30, 1948 

Since June 1, at which time my work as Associational Mis- 
sionary started, I have participated in the following activities: 

Assisted in 13 Vacation Bible Schools. 

Helped plan an associational wide mission study. 

Held Sunday Services in 11 churches. 

Had a part in four W. M. U. programs. 

Attended Sunday School and prayer services in several churches. 

Assisted in one Associational Bible School Clinic. 

Assisted in one Associational B. T. U. Conference. 

Taught one B. T. U. Study Course. 

Attended two conferences at Seaside. 

Attended a Regional Sunday School Conference at Goldsboro. 

Attended 13 committee meetings and led 28 group conferences 

of various kinds within the Association. 
Held 158 conferences with individuals concerning local church 

work. 
Traveled 4,520 miles in carrying on my work. 

During the four months since my work began, I have become 
acquainted with most of the pastors, Sunday School superinten- 
dents, and other church leaders. I have endeavored to carry on an 
active program in which I could be of assistance to various churches 
in their individual programs and also to the Association as a whole 
in helping to promote different phases of the work. Recently, I 
made a survey of achievements per member within our Association 
as compared with achievements per member in the Southern Bap- 



LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 15 

tist Convention. Our Association rates as follows: 

Evangelism 93% 

Sunday School Enrollment 105% 

Sunday School Attendance 108% 

Training Union Enrollment 69% 

Training Union Attendance 57% 

W. M. U. Enrollment 106% 

Local Gifts 108% 

Mission Gifts 76% 

Average , 90.2% 

Let me encourage each church to do its best to help raise the 
average of our Association up to the average of the Southern Baptist 
Convention. We can do this by putting forth a special effort to im- 
prove in those things in which we were below 100%. 

(These percentages were based on last year's records.) 

By means of personal visits, news bulletins, and announcements 
I have brought to the attention of the churches different denomi- 
national causes and phases of organizational work as presented by 
our Associational, State, and Southern Baptist leaders. 

I wish to express to the associational officers, pastors, church 
leaders, and church people generally my sincere appreciation for 
the cooperation and the hearty reception given me since I have been 
in this work. 

There are many things that, with God's help, we should like 
to see accomplished in the Association during the new year. It is 
impossible to list all of these, but the following recommendations 
are made for your consideration: 

1. That any church which may need to secure a pastor give 
careful consideration to the possibilities of having a pastor on the 
field. 

2. That we endeavor to increase within our churches the ef- 
ficiency of our present organizations and to form new organizations 
where they -are needed. 

3. That special attention be given in order to provide training 
organizations for young people as well as adults. 

4. That each church as soon as possible begin to make plans 
for a Vacation Bible School to be held early in the summer. 

5. That every church member be given the opportunity to 
participate in some type of special training activity during the 
year. 

6. That each church give prayful consideration to the forma- 
tion of a Brotherhood organization for the men of the church. 



16 LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 

7. That the members of the different organizations familiarize 
themselves with the splendid opportunities for training and inspira- 
tion provided by the summer assemblies at Fruitland and Seaside 
and make plans to take advantage of these opoprtunities. 

8. Tliat each church plan a well-rounded financial program in 
order to support adequately local work and missions. 

9. That evangelism be the goal of the church program. 

My services are available to assist in carrying out any of these 
activities. 

Respectfully submitted, 
ROGER C. JOHNSON. 

27. The report was adopted by the Association as given 
above. 

28. Miss Mattie Bain was recognized and presented her 
report on State, Home, and Foreign missions. 



REPORT ON MISSIONS 

God has blessed the work of Southern Baptist from our own 
state' to the ends of the earth. Through the 17 activities named in the 
Biblical Recorder of October 20th our State Mission work has and 
is going forward. Dr. J. B. Lawrence tells us that in the homeland 
we have groups from thirty-seven nationalities, many of these peo- 
ple cannot speak our language, they are not having a chance except 
where missionaries have gone to them with the gospel. Our foreign 
mis ionaries on every field are asking for more buildings and work- 
ers. Millions of people have never heard the pure gospel! Doors 
are wide open waiting for us to enter. The work that has been done 
for misisons through the leadership of our State, Home and Foreign 
Mission Boards has brought untold blessings to the world. The pro- 
gram'^, of advance for all our missions at home and abroad would 
enable us to grant these requests and provide the new missionaries 
needed. Of course our boards need money but they need the kingdom 
spirit — that spirit manifested by the first church as it began its 
work of evangelizing the world. 

How then shall we meet this call for advance? Prayer will find 
the needed workers. There ought to be a larger amount of money 
for missions, and if every Baptist were a tither we would reach the 
slogan which has been given us, "Fifty Fifty by 1950." Not for a 
day nor a year do we labor. It is for Christ and eternity. 

Respectfully submitted, 
MATTIE BAIN. 



LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 17 

29. The report of the W. M. U. was presented by the 
Associational President, Mrs. D. B. Andrews. 

REPORT OF WOMAN'S MISSIONARY UNION 

The year 1948 marks the sixtieth anniversary of organized 
work of Woman's Missionary Union, auxiliary to our Southern Bap- 
tist Convention. Remembering what great things God hath done for 
us we dedicated this, "Our Commemoration Year," and adopted 
the watchword, "For God, and Home, and Every Land." 

In bringing this report, I pause to express to our Moderator, 
Brother Leslie H. Campbell, to our Associational Missionary, Broth- 
er Roger Johnson, and to each pastor present, our gratitude for all 
the help and inspiration you have brought to us in our work. 

Our annual meeting, held in the First Baptist Church of Dunn in 
April, was an occasion that called us to a closer walk with God. 
The attendance was splendid, the hospitality unbounded. Four ex- 
ecutive meetings have been held, one of which took the form of a 
Leadership Conference, and was held in the Friendship Church in 
January. More than 100 women from our Association attended 
our divisional meeting in Clayton in October. A large delegation 
attended our state meeting in Greensboro in March. 

We now have W. M. U. organizations in 26 churches, leaving 
only 2 churches having no organized work. During the past as- 
sociational year, we have had 2 new missionary societies, 1 Girls' 
Auxiliary, and 1 Royal Ambassador Chapter. Our youngest mis- 
sionary society is in the newly organized Duncan Church. Our re- 
port show 66^ women, and 576 young people enrolled. 

Mrs. H. D. Wood, Jr., Mission Study chairman, reports that 
more than 1100 women and young people attended associational 
mission study classes. Many others have attended classes held in 
local organizations, all studying the needs and opportunities on 
fields white unto harvest. 

Our gifts of money amounted to about $11,000.00. With re- 
ports of 133 new tithers, we thank God and take courage. 

Believing that God is the same yesterday, today, and forever, 
•may we also hear him say to us: "Fear not! As I have been with 
others, so will I be with you. Only be strong, and very courageous. 
I am thy God. I'll still give thee aid. I'll strengthen thee, help thee, 
and cause thee to stand, upheld by my righteous, omnipotent hand." 

Respectfully submitted, 
MRS. D. B. ANDREWS. 

30. Brother Earl Bradley spoke to the preaching and 
witnessing reports and commented on the well-balanced pro- 
gram of the day. 



18 LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 

3L The report of the nominating committee was ac- 
cepted. The lists of the various officers appears in the front of 
these Minutes. 

32. The recommendations of the Executive Committee 
were presented by Brother S. L. Morgan, Jr. 

33. The motion was made and accepted to receive the 
Siniday School and Baptist Training Union reports as pre- 
sented at the morning session. 

SUNDAY SCHOOL REPORT 

The report will consist of four parts: (1) Report on some gains 
and lo ses in the churches; (2) Some things the Associational or- 
ganization has done; (3) What Associational unit plans to do, and 
(4) Some general recommendations for the new year. 

1. Report on Sunday School and Vacation Bible School losses 
and gains. 

At the time this tabulation was made, Buie's Creek, Layton's 
Chapel, and Holly Springs had not sent in reports, so the informa- 
tion is not complete, but the gains and losses of those reporting are 
compared with corresponding figures of last year's reports. 

(1) Sunday School enrollment; 7 churches report losses, 3 re- 
port the same, and 13 report gains. The net gain is 34. 

(2) S. S. attendance: 14 churches report losses, 3 report same, 
and 5 report gain. The net loss is 76. Bad weather in February 
and "Polio" epidemic in the summer are responsible for much of 
the loss. 

(3) Vacation Bible School enrollment: 5 report losses, 1 re- 
ports same, and 11 report gains. The net loss is 3. 

(4) V. B. S. Attendance: 9 churches report losses, and 10 re- 
port gains. The net loss is 53. 

2. Some activities of the Associational Officers: 

One general conference meeting was held, three officers' meet- 
ings were held, 2 officers attended the State V.B.S. Clinic of 3 days, 
eight attended the state planning meeting, an Associational V. B. S. 
Clinic of 5 hrs. was conducted, the extension Supt. sent out ma- 
terials and three letters to all churches. The V. B. S. Superintendent 
visited 15 churches, and numerous contacts were made personally 
or by letter by all the officers. 

3. The Associational organization with the help of Pastors and 
other interested people has planned to visit every church in the 
Association within the next two weeks to find out some needs, to 
present the suggested goals and aims of the Southern Baptist S. S. 



LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 19 

Department, and to help the churches set up definite goals and aims 
lor the coming year. The departmental superintendents offer to 
assiit any S. S. in their group, and all the officers will gladly do 
what they can to assist any Sunday School. Three of our officers plan 
to attend a Statewide Administration Clinic at Shelby in January. 
4. The Associational Superintendent would like to make the 
following recommendations: 

(1) That each local superintendent lead his school to adopt 
the aims and goals set by the Southern Baptist Sunday School De- 
partment. 

(2) That each school study and follow as it best can, the 
Calendar of Activities recommended by the Sunday School Board. 

(3) That all schools that can, organize Cradle Roll and Ex- 
tension Departments. Only nine Cradle Roll and five Extension 
Departments were reported. Every church has babies and some 
people who cannot attend Sunday School. No building space is 
required for these departments. 

(4) That all schools have courses of study in Administration 
or Better Bible Teaching. 

(5) That each local Superintendent will urge all teachers and 
officers to accept the invitation of the Antioch Baptist Church to 
attend the Annual Study Course there the week of Nov. 7 taught 
by a state worker, Rev. D. P. Brooks. 

In general, the quality of the work being done in the churches 
is commendable. There are still enough possibilities for enlargment, 
better teaching, and evangelism, to challenge us to nobler work. 

Respectfully submitted, 
RAYMOND E. MOORE, 
Associational S. S. Supt. 

BAPTIST TRAINING UNION REPORT 

The Little River Association has reason to be encouraged be- 
cause of the accomplishments of the past. We have at present 14 
of the 28 churches with Training Unions. In these churches we 
have a total of 10 Story Hour Unions, 16 Junior Unions, 14 Inter- 
mediate Unions, 12 Young People Unions, and 10 Adult Unions, 
with an approximate enrollment of 1044. 

We have held 2 executive meetings, 3 Associational meetings 
with good attendance. 

We had entries in our memory work, Better Speakers, and 
Scripture Reading contests. 

Various Training Unions held Study courses during the year. 

For the coming year we recommend: 

1. An executive committee meeting once each quarter. 

2. Begin early working on the contests. 



20 LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 

3. Since we have 14 of our 28 churches with Training Unions, 
we suggest that each of these 14 Training Unions be responsible 
for the organization of Training Union work in one church. These 
assignments should be made immediately. 

These goals indeed furnish us with a challenge for the com- 
ing year. May we unitedly and wholeheartedly accept this chal- 
lenge! 

Respectfully submitted, 
TRUBY POWELL. 

34. Motion was made and passed to dedicate this year's 
minutes to Leslie H. Campbell, our Moderator. 

35. Motion was made and passed that we reemploy Broth- 
er Roger Johnson for the coming year. 

36. Motion was made and passed that the Moderator's re- 
port be accepted as follows: 

MODERATOR'S REPORT 

1. Urging at every opportunity the importance of churches who 
have only part-time preaching forming themselves into fields and 
employing resident pastors. Much waste in the efficiency of any 
church must exist when it hasn't the benefit of pastoral services 
during the week days. 

2. Urge upon our churches the importance of raising pastor's 
salaries for next year so as to provide each preacher a total salary 
of not less than $2,400 for full time. Nothing less will support a 
capable full-time worker with a family plus traveling expenses. 

3. Urge that every pastor in the Association attend regularly 
the monthly pastor's meetings on the first Monday in each month. 
Cooperation among the churches in our total program can be 
f^reatly improved through such discussions. Approximately one- 
half of the pastors at present do not attend with any degree of 
re'^u^arity. 

4. Reaffirm our understanding of two years ago that each 
church be asked to contribute at least 3 per cent of the total budget 
exclusive of building funds for the support of our Associational 
program now led by Brother Roger Johnson. 

5. Arrange to hold in as many churches as possible next year 
what might be called Church-Clinics. Such clinics might be con- 
ducted by a group composed of the moderator, associational mis- 
sionary, training union director, Sunday School superintendent, 
and W. M. U. president, and secretary of Evangelism. The purpose 
of the clinic would be to discuss with the total membership of the 
local church the various activities and functions of the church and 
to plan for improvements. 



LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 21 



6. Encourage every chjurch to make plans for Stewardship 
Sunday, at which time some of our leading well-informed laymen 
and pastors will explain and emphasize this important doctrine. 

7. Appoint a committee to consider making later in the year 
a scientific Associational survey to reveal the possibilities for service 
in our territory and the un-met needs. This appointment should 
carry with it the authorization of the Association to make such a 
survey, should it seem advisable. 

8. Recommend that we continue the policy of a one-day ses- 
sion for our annual business meeting. 

9. However, that we recognize as official meetings of the as- 
sociation such associational gatherings as planned by the S. S. and 
B. T. U. and W. M. U. Mission Study and Young People's Rallies. 

37. The report on the committee on Time, Place and 
Preacher was accepted as follows: The time to be as specified 
in the Constitution. The Place to be Rawls Church. The Preach- 
er to be E. C. Keller, pastor of Dunn, Second Church; J. M, 
Long, Coats Church, Alternate. 

38. Miss Lillian Draughon gave the report of the Resolu- 
tions Committee which was adopted as follows: 

REPORT OF COMMITTEE ON RESOLUTIONS 

Your Committee on Resolutions in behalf of the membership 
of the Little River Association wishes to express our sincere ap- 
preciation to the members of Macedonia, Duncan, Piney Grove 
Churcbc: for their spIencUi hospitality in entertaining this the 
73rd annual meeting of the Association. 

For the very comprehensive program with its new features 
we express appreciation. 

To Brother R. S. Moore we express thanks for the timely mes- 
sage to our churches encouraging full support of Christ's program 
for Kingdom building. Also, to the visiting speakers and all who 
appear on the program we express deep gratitude. 

To our new Associational Missionary, Brother R. C. Johnson 
ps-urnnce is given that we do honor his leadership and uphold him 
with our prayers. 

To Brother L. H. Campbell, Moderator of our Association we ex- 
press deepest appreciation for his encouraging and inspiring report 
and for his continued efforts to lead us to a higher standard of 
service in the Master's work. 

Respectfully submitted, 
MISS LILLIAN DRAUGHON, Chmn. 
MRS. R. E. MOORE, 
MRS. FOREST MAXWELL. 



22 



LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



39. Brother Scott Turner and Brother E. C. Keller spoke 
on the needs of the people in the community of the Second 
Baptist Church of Dunn and made appeals for help. 

40. The motion was made and passed that the clerk send 
a message of cheer to Dr. Paul Bagby and a message of regards 
to Miss Zula Rogers. 

41. The Treasurer's report was presented and adopted as 
follows: 



TREASURER'S REPORT 

to the 
LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION— OCT. 26, 1948. 



RECEIPTS: 

Bal. on hand '47 $ 260.35 

Angler 177.69 

Antioch 197.50 



Baptist Chapel 


3.15 


Baptist Grove 


... 29.48 


Bethel 




Broadway 


... 10.00 


Buies Creek 


200.00 


Chalybeate Springs 


... 20.00 


Coats 


65 00 


Cumberland Union 


... 28.00 


Dunn, First ._ 


... 565.00 


Dunn, Second 


4.20 


Erwin, East _ 


6.30 


Erwin, First 


... 160.50 


Friendship 





Harmony 


.... 11.00 


Holly Springs 




Kennebec -- 19.66 


Layton's Chapel 


3.15 


Lillington 


... 160.00 


Macedonia 


30.25 


Neills Creek 


.... 15.00 


Oak Grove 


.... 22.35 


Piney Grove 


12.60 


Pleasant Memory 


23.00 


Rawls 


Swanns Station 


.... 20.00 


Bapt. State Conv 


.... 525.00 


Duncan 


2.65 


Undesignated 


.... 119.77 



$2691.60 

DISBURSEMENTS: 

G. G. Page (expense as S. S. Supt. '47) $ 40.00 

H. D. Wood (Clerk fee for 1947) 50.00 

L. H. Campbell (remuneration to a man who visited the as- 
sociation with view to accepting the work) 22.00 

Theo Davis Sons — Minutes 145.31 

Roger Johnson (salary and expense through Oct. 1948) 1625.00 

On deposit First Citizens Bank and Trust Co., Angier 809.29 



$2691.60 



LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 23 

Records, checks, etc., are on the clerk's desk for your exami- 
nation. 

Due to the increased cost of printing, minutes this year will 
cost considerably above any previous cost. 

Theo Davis Sons have been printing our minutes, but they are 
not prepared to print the minutes anytime this year. The clerk is 
taking the liberty of finding a reputable printer to do this work for 
us. 

The Treasurer has not been instructed otherwise, and will take 
the cost of printing minutes out of the general fund as the amounts 
sent in by the churches will not cover this cost. 

Respectfully submitted, 
HARRY D. WOOD, JR., 
Clerk-Treasurer. 

42. The afternoon session adjourned with prayer by 
Brother W. C. Reed. 

EVENING SESSION 

43. Singing of the hymn "All Hail The Power of Jesus' 
Name" opened the evening session at 7:30 PM. Brother Harry 
D. Wood, Jr., Clerk had returned and was serving. 

44. Brother Joe R. Puckett, visitor from Smithfield, led 
in the opening prayer. 

45. Mrs. J. G. Layton was recognized to present the fol- 
lowing report: 

REPORT ON MINISTERIAL RELIEF 

The demands on the relief department of the Relief and An- 
nuity Board for 1947 were heavier than in any previous year. 
Scores of requests for increases were received. Aged preachers and 
widows who had never asked for assistance, and who had thought 
they would never need it, found their meager incomes insufficient 
to provide the necessities of life and have sought help from the 
relief department. 

The appeals for aid and for increases of grants are easily under- 
stood as the cost of food, clothing, fuel and rents has increased. 

For every request which the committee thought worthy, some 
increase has been granted, and, in most cases, these increases meant 
the difference between the bare necessities of life and dire want. 

Under the double budget of 1948 receipts for relief were in- 
creased. But requests for increase of grants and applications to be 
placed on the relief roll are coming in every week and it will be 



24 LITTLE RIVER BA PTIST ASSOCIATION 

impossible for the relief department to meet its responsibilities unless 
contributions to relief are supplemented. 

According to the Calendar of Denominational Activities, recom- 
mended and approved by the Southern Baptist Convention, every 
Baptist Church was asked to make a fellowship offering for the 
relief department during April. 

Our aged ministers served when pastors' salaries were small 
and before the Relief and Annuity Board was founded. All they 
have in the way of a retirement benefit is the relief department 
of our Board. These founders of our denomination would be helped 
in a material way, and our churches would be blessed spiritually 
if annually a fellowship offering for relief was made in connection 
with the observance of the Lord's Supper. 

Let's try it! 

(MRS. JOEL G.) MAUDE C. LAYTON. 

46. Brother Joe M. Long was recognized. He presented 
the report prepared by Mrs. W. E. Nichols on the work of the 
American Bible Society. 

REPORT ON AMERICAN BIBLE SOCIETY 

Through the American Bible Society we are given the op- 
portunity as Baptists to help send the Word of God into all the 
v/orld. Emergency supplies of scriptures will be sent this year to 
15 of the most needy areas overseas — reaching 7,856,000 copies, 
the largest supplies are for Germany, Japan and Russia. 

I asked every pastor in our Association to observe the second 
Sunday in September as American Bible Society Day and to send 
an offering to Mr. M. A. Huggins. We are also being asked to pro- 
mote the Fifth Annual Worldwide Bible Reading — Thanksgiving to 
Christmas — 1948. It is a plan to get millions of people in America 
and all over the world to read the same Bible selections daily be- 
tween Thanksgiving and Christmas, Nov. 25 to Dec. 25. It also has 
as its Central Day, Universal Bible Sunday, Dec. 12. You may 
obtain all these leaflets from American Bible Society, 450 Park 
Ave., New York 22, N. Y. 

Respectfully submitted, 

EVA M. NICHOLS (Mrs. W. E.) 

47. Brother Forest Maxwell was recognized. He presented 
the following report prepared by Mrs. L. Jackson: 



LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 25 

REPORT OF RELIGIOUS LITERATURE 

During the past year our churches have been placing greater 
emphasis on the use of religious literature. I think we have more 
than ever before realized the effect which our religious literature 
has upon the life of our homes and churches. I am sure that our 
people realize that the best way of getting rid of the undesirable 
literature is to replace it with good religious literature. 

During the past year greater emphasis has been placed upon 
the study of the Bible as a background for our Christian training. 
Our Sunday School Board publishes many periodicals that are very 
valuable in the molding of the lives of our children. The main pur- 
pose of these papers is to cultivate Christian Character and Christian 
growth. The least we can do is to see that they are put in our 
homes for our children to read and study. 

The Biblical Recorder, our State publication is being read by 
more of our people. It keeps us in touch with the splendid work 
done by our churches throughout the state and here in our own as- 
sociation. We note a great increase in the subscribers of this paper. 

We recommend that you make as much of the valuable litera- 
ture as possible available to your church and your home. We further 
recommend wherever it is possible that you inaugurate the every 
member plan or either the club plan for the recorder. 

The interesting news found in our literature will cause us to 
pray more intelligently, give more liberally and trust more firmly 
in God. 

Respectfully submitted, 
MYRTIE W. JACKSON. 

48. Brother Sam Hudson presented the report on Civic 
Righteousness. 

49. Brother A. C. McCall, pastor of Friendship Church, 
brought the message of the evening on the evils of beverage 
alcohol and gave a plea to support the effort of all ministers 
of all denominations in the county to secure a county election 
on the liquor question. 

50. Brother S. L. Morgan, Jr., moved our cooperation in 
the above mentioned effort. There was extensive favorable com- 
ment. The motion passed. 

51. Brother Sam Hudson moved the adjournment of this 
session to meet in 1949 at Rawls Baptist Church, located on 
Highway U. S. 15-A a few miles south of Fuquay Springs. 



26 LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 

REPORT FROM DUNCAN BAPTIST CHURCH 

Pastor G. Scott Turner, Jr., Chalybeate Springs 

Clerk J. Leo Betts, Fuquay Springs, Rt. 1 

S. S. Supt Charles B. Tutor, Fuquay Springs, Rt. 1 

Pres. W. M. U.. Mrs. Minnie Goodwin, Holly Springs, Rt. 2 

Choir Director Delmas O'Connell, Holly Springs, Rt. 2 

Organist _ ...Mrs. A. E. Rollins, Fuquay Springs, Rt. 2 

Treasurer Mrs. Alta Tutor, Fuquay Springs, Rt. 1 

Present membership 67 

Sunday School membership 110 

W. M. S. Enrolment 10 

Local Gifts $621.42 

Missions 28.33 

Total gifts all causes $649.95 

This Baptist Church was organized at Duncan, Fuquay Springs, 
Rt. 1, on March 21, 1948. Present at the organization with others 
.were L. H. Campbell, Moderator of the Little River Association; G. 
Scott Turner, Sr., pastor of Chalybeate Springs and Neills Creek 
Churches in this Association; and Roger Johnson, now Missionary 
for this Association. This church has not yet made application for 
membership in the Little River Baptist Association, but has co- 
operated faithfully with the Association and the denomination. 

AUXILIARY MEETINGS 

None reported. 



LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 27 



OUR BELOVED DEAD 



ANGIER — Mr. John R. Johnson. 

ANTIOCH— Mrs. J. D. Byrd, Mr. Neill Davis, Mrs. Martha J. Brown, 
Mr. W. B. Lynch, Mr. J. L. Nordan, Mr. W. T. Brown. 

BAPTIST CHAPEL— Mr. Laster Thomas, Mrs. J. R. Howard. 

BAPTIST GROVE— Mrs. Ester Wall, Mrs. V. R. Mitchell. 

BETHEL — Mr. Frank Coleman, Mrs. Ray L. Swann. 

BROADWAY— Mrs. Arra Buchanan. 

BUIES CREEK — Mr. Junius W. Denning, Miss Effie Jane Andrews. 

CHALYBEATE SPRINGS— Miss Shirley Jean Rambeau, Miss Joyce 
Rambeau, Mr. Bernice G. Rambeau. 

COATS— Dr. C. G. Fuquay, Mrs. C. G. Fuquay, Mr. J. F. Parrish. 

DUNN, FIRST— Mr. L. R. Reardon, Mr. E. B. Johnson, Mr. A. C. 
Parker, Mr. W. M. Brannon, Mrs. J. E. Stephenson, Mrs. Ben 
Parker, Sgt. Bernice Godwin, Mr. Silas Turlington. 

ERWIN, FIRST— Mrs. Amma Johnson, Mr. William Matthews. 

FRIENDSHIP— Mrs. H. S. Byrd. 

HARMONY— Mr. Joel G. Layton (Deacon). 

HOLLY SPRINGS— Mr. Abner McNeill, Mr. O. C. I. McNeill, Mr. 
Emory Wilson, Mrs. Katherine Hommonk. 

LILLINGTON— Mr. W. T. Hockaday, Mr. J. D. Gossett, Mrs. J. D. 
Gossett, Mr. Neill W. Maness (Deacon). 

MACEDONIA— Mr. E. F. Baker. 

NEILLS CREEK— Mr. Mack Johnson. 

PINEY GROVE— Mr. Addie Powell, Mrs. Lettie Murry, Mrs. Hettie 
McCotter. 

PLEASANT MEMORY— Mr. Walter Cooke. 

RAWLS— Mr. David Henry Senter. 

SWANNS STATION— Mr. H. A. Calcutt. 



28 LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 

ORDAINED MINISTERS 

Name Address Church Membership Work 

T. L. Atkins, Raleigh, Rt. 4 ? Pastor 

R. E. Atkins, 27 Dixie Trail, Raleigh.... ? Pastor 

J. E. Ayscue, Buies Creek Buies Creek Retired 

A. Paul Bagby, Buies Creek Buies Creek Pastor 

J. F. Blackmon, Buies Creek JBuies Creek Retired 

C. T. Gray, New Hill ? Pastor 

R. F. Hall, Lillington Lillington Inactive 

Chas. B. Howard, Buies Creek Buies Creek Pastor 

Sam F. Hudson, Lillington Lillington Pastor 

B. W. Jackson, 119 Hillsboro St., Ral...Angier State Worker 

E. C. Keller, Box 441, Dunn JDunn, Second Pastor 

J. M. Long, Coats _ Coats .- Pastor 

Lester Mann, Durham, Rt. 4 .Macedonia .... Licensed Pastor 

Forest Maxwell, Erwin Erwin, First Pastor 

A. C. McCall. Bunnlevel Friendship Pastor 

R E. Moore, Mamers Antioch Pastor 

Henry Morgan, Wake Forest Harmony Student 

S. L. Morgan, Jr., Dunn Dunn, First Pastor 

T^ovie Pope, Leland ? Pastor 

0. W. Pulley, Erwin .Erwin, East Pastor 

C. E. Ruffin, Broadway .Broadway Pastor 

1. K. Stafford, Buies Creek Buies Creek Ps^tor 

Geo. Swann, Buies Creek Buies C'k. .Educational Worker 

G. S. Turner, Sr., Chalybeate Springs. .Chalybeate Spgs Pastor 

G. S. Turner, Jr., Chalybeate Springs..Chalybeate Spgs. Lice'd Pastor 

Baxter Walker, Fayetteville ? Pastor 

Tom White, Buies Creek Buies Creek Pastor 

T. H. Williams, Raleigh, Rt. 2 ? Pastor 

Harry D. Wood, Jr., Angier Angier Pastor 



ASSISTANT PASTORS OR EDUCATIONAL DIRECTORS 

None. 

MINISTERS LICENSED THIS YEAR 

Johnnie Randall Adams -. Buies Creek 

Hovie Pope Buies Creek 

G. Scott Turner, Jr Chalybeate Springs 

MINISTERS ORDAINED THIS YEAR 

None. 



LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 29 

STUDENTS FOR THE MINISTRY 

Name Address School 

Randall Adams, Buies Creek Campbell 

Jack Byrd, Wake Forest Wake Forest 

Thomas Faircloth, Wake Forest Wake Forest 

J. H. Ginsburg, Buies Creek Campbell 

Alton Hays, ? ? 

Russell L. Hinton, Buies Creek Campbell 

Hovie Pope, Buies Creek Campbell 

G. Scott Turner, Jr., Chalybeate Springs Campbell 

Warren Turner, Buies Creek Campbell 

George Waddell, Wake Forest Wake Forest 

Thomas D. Welch, Buies Creek Campbell 

Tom White, Buies Creek Campbell 

CHOIR DIRECTORS— All Volunteers 

Angler Mrs. H. D. Wood, Jr Angler 

Antioch M. G. Patterson Mamers 

Baptist Grove ilenry Howell Fuquay Springs, Rt. 1 

Bethel Leland Matthews Linden, Rt. 1 

Broadway M. A. Thomas Broadway 

Chalybeate Springs ....T. L. Caviness Fuquay Springs, Rt. 1 

Coats Mrs. F. H. Fleming Coats 

Cumberland Union ...J. O. Weathers Fuquay Springs, Rt. 2 

Dunn, First W. L. Thames Dunn 

Dunn, Second B. O. Slaughter Dunn, Rt. 1 

Erwin, East W. C. Stone, Erwin Erwin 

Erwin, First Mrs. C. L. Byrd Erwin 

Friendship Mrs. Archibald Byrd Bunnlevel 

Harmony Andrew Yarbrough Lillington 

Holly Springs .Willie Nordan Broadway 

Layton's Chapel J. H. Butts Bunnlevel 

Lillington Mrs. Ruth Brown Lillington 

Macedonia .Leo Weathers Holly Springs, Rt. 1 

Neills Creek .T. G. Johnson Lillington 

Piney Grove .W. L. Norris Holly Springs 

Rawls Henry Rawls 

Swanns Station H. W. Graham Sanford, Rt. 6 

PIANISTS OR ORGANISTS 

Angler Mrs. W. M. Morgan Angler 

Antioch Miss Margie Stewart Lillington, Rt. 3 

Baptist Chapel Miss Nellie Howard Jonesboro Heights 

Station, Sahford, Rt. 7 
Baptist Grove Mrs. Maude Lou Rogers ....Fuquay Spgs., Rt. 1 



30 LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 

Bethel Mrs. H. W. Blalock Linden, Rt. 1 

Broadway Miss Laura Rosser ...Broadway 

Chalybeate Springs ....Mrs. W. M. Pearson Chalybeate Springs 

Coats Mrs. Clem Godwin Coats 

Cumberland Union ....Mrs. Thomas Sears Fuquay Springs, Rt. 1 

Dunn, First Mrs. C. C. Upchurch Dunn 

Dunn, Second Mrs. Derwood Godwin Dunn, Rt. 4 

Erwin, East Mrs. Kathleen Barefoot Erwin 

Erwin, First Mrs. L. Jackson Erwin 

Friendship Mrs. Roy Jones Bunnlevel 

Harmony Mrs. Geo. R. Souders Lillington, Rt. 2 

Holly Springs Miss Bessie McNeill Broadway 

Layton's Chapel Mrs. Nellie Shaw Manchester 

Lillington Mrs. J. T. Long Lillington, Rt. 1 

Macedonia Mrs. Lena Smith Holly Springs, Rt. 1 

Neills Creek Mrs. Alyda Smith ...Fuquay Springs, Rt. 2 

Oak Grove Miss Ada Denton Lillington, Rt. 1 

Piney Grove Mrs. Cora Adcock Holly Springs 

Pleasant Memory Mrs. Carlie McLamb Coats, Rt. 1 

Rawls Mrs. Clinton Abernathy Fuquay Springs 

Swanns Station Mrs. W. B. Castlebury Sanford, Rt. 6 

LIBRARIANS 

Antioch Miss Haget Weaver Lillington, Rt. 3 

Broadway Miss Marybeth Thomas Broadway 

Dunn, First Miss Ruth Thames Dunn 

Holly Springs Mrs. Ruth Patterson ..Broadway 

Swanns Station Dausey Coleman Sanford, Rt. 6 



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POPE PRINTING CO., DUNN, N. C. 



LITTLE RIVER 

BAPTIST 
ASSOCIATION 

North Carolina 



Seventy-Fourth Annual Session 

Meeting With 

RAWLS BAPTIST CHURCH 

October 25, 1949 



The next regular session of the Association will meet with 

the Piney Grove Baptist Church Tuesday after the 

fourth Sunday in October 1950 

Annual sermon will be preached by Dr. J. W. Angel! 
Rev. Ernest P. Russell, Alternate 



LITTLE RIVER 

BAPTIST 
ASSOCIATION 

North Carolina 



Seventy-Fourth Annual Session 

Meeting With 

RAWLS BAPTIST CHURCH 

October 25, 1949 



The next regular session of the Association will meet with 

the Piney Grove Baptist Church Tuesday after the 

fourth Sunday in O^ctober 1950 

Annual sermon will be preached by Dr. J. W. Angell 
Rev. Ernest P. Russell, Alternate 



2 LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 

INDEX 

ASSOCIATIONAL DIRECTORY 5 

CHOIR DIRECTORS 30 

CHURCH DIRECTORS 29 

CONSTITUTION 10 

HISTORICAL TABLE BEGINS 32 

OUR BELOVED DEAD 28 

ORDAINED MINISTERS 29 

LICENSED MINISTERS 29 

LIBRARIANS 31 

LIST OF MESSENGERS 8 

PROCEEDINGS 12 

PIANIST OR ORGANISTS 31 

STATISTICAL TABLES BEGIN : 32 

STUDENTS FOR THE MINISTRY 30 

REPORTS 

AMERICAN BIBLE SOCIETY 14 

BAPTIST HOSPITAL 13 

BAPTIST ORPHANAGE 12 

BAPTIST TRAINING UNION 20 

CHRISTIAN EDUCATION 15 

DUNCAN BAPTIST CHURCH 21 

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 23 

MINISTERIAL RELIEF 18 

MODERATOR'S REPORT 18 

RESOLUTIONS COMMITTEE 22 

SOCIAL JUSTICE AND CIVIC RIGHTEOUSNESS 25 

SUNDAY SCHOOL 20 

TREASURER'S REPORT 24 

WOMAN'S MISSIONARY UNION 16 




FRED HENRY FLEMING 

To Whom This Annual Is Dedicated By Order Of The 
Executive Board Of The Association 

Born October 2, 1899, at Mocksville, N. C, the youngest son 
of the late Robert Nesbitt and Elizabeth Tatum Fleming. Graduated 
in Pharmacy at the University of North Carolina in 1924. Studied 
medicine at Wake Forest College, (B. S.) and Tulane University 
School of Medicine (M. D.) in 1930. Had practiced in 



4 Lll TLE R1\TR BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



Harnett County since 1930. He was college physician at Campbell 
College, a member of the Board of Directors of the Dunn Hospital 
since its beginning and on the staff of the Good Hope Hospital at 
Erwin. He was a member of the American Medical Association, 
the State and County Medical Societies, being a past president of 
the latter organization. He was a deacon of the Coats Baptist 
Church. His death occurred the day before his fiftieth birthday. 

Few men among us more completely dedicated themselves to 
the service of their fellow man. His poise, gentleness, purity of 
life and self-forgetfulness in relieving human suffering made him 
one of the most beloved among his contemporaries. His daily life 
was an exemplification of the noblest, most lovely Christian graces. 



LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 5 

DIRECTORY 
of The Association 

1. GENERAL OFFICERS OF THE ASSOCIATION 

Moderator L. H. Campbell, Buie's Creek 

Vice-Moderator Sam F. Hudson, Lillington 

Clerk W. A. Johnson, Lillington 

Treasurer J. C. Bullock, Lillington 

2. EXECUTIVE BOARD MEMBERS 

Moderator L. H. Campbell, Buie's Creek 

Vice-Moderator Sam F. Hudson, Lillington 

Clerk W. A. Johnson, Lillington 

S. S. Superintendent Julius Holloway, Lillington 

B. T. U. Director L. L. Coats, Dunn 

W. M. U. President. ...Mrs. D. B. Andrews, Fuquay Springs, RFD 

Supt. of Evangelism G. Scott Turner, Kipling 

W. H. Stephenson _ Angier 

C. D. Bain Dunn 

C. E. Ruffin Broadway 

Forest Maxwell _ Erwin 

3. ASSOCIATIONAL MISSIONARY 

Rev. R. E. Moore Lillington, N. C. 

4. OFFICERS OF ASSOCIATIONAL W. M. U. 

Superintendent Mrs. D. B. Andrews, Fuquay Springs, RFD 

Associate Supt Mrs. Beulah B. Dula, Chalybeate Springs 

Secretary-Treasurer Mrs. Berles Johnson, Lillington, Rt. 1 

Young People's Leaders.. Mrs. Robert L. Young, Angier 

Miss Marjorie Spence, Lillington, Rt. 1 

R. A. Counselor Rev. R. E. Moore, Lillington 

Chairmen: 

Stewardship Miss Lillian Draughon, Dunn 

Mission Study Mrs. D. C. Woodall, Erwin 

Community Missions. Mrs. J. F. Cameron, Bunnlevel 

Literature Mrs. L. Jackson, Erwin 

Margaret Fund Mrs. L. B. Smith, Fuquay Springs 

Training School Mrs. R. E. Moore, Lillington 

White Cross. Mrs. J. M. Long, Coats 



6 LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 

5. ASSOCIATIONAL SUNDAY SCHOOL OFFICERS 

Superintendent Julius Holloway, Lillington 

Enlargement _ ..._ Rev. E. P. Russell, Dunn 

Training Mrs. G. Van Stephens, Angier 

Evangelism Rev. G. Scott Turner, Kipling 

Vacation Bible School Irvin Stephens, Lillington, Rt. 3 

Secretary - F. M. Puryear, Lillington 

Departmental Superintendents: 

Extension Mrs. Leslie Turlington, Buie's Creek 

Adult - - Norman L. Smith, Angier 

Young People .....George Williams, Dunn 

Intermediate Miss Fannie Bell Smith, Dunn 

Junior....... Miss Zula Rogers, Mamers 

Primary Miss Mamie Haighwood, Lillington 

Beginner Miss Dorothy Womble, Lillington 

Cradle Roll Mrs. H. M. O'Quinn, Mamers 

Nursery Mrs. C. L. Guy, Dunn 

Group Leaders: 

Northern Bill Beck, Fuquay Springs, Rt. 1 

North Eastern. .C. D. Bain, Dunn, and W. M. Morgan, Angier 

Southern _ Joe Bullock, Lillington 

Western W. Roosevelt McNeil, Broadway 

6. ASSOCIATIONAL B. T. U. OFFICERS 

Director L, L. Coats, Dunn 

Associate Director B. O. Slaughter, Dunn 

Secretary Patricia Ruth Johnson, Dunn 

Chorister (Hynm Festival Leader) W. L. Thames, Dunn 

Pianist Miss Margie Stewart, Lillington, Rt. 3 

Pastor Adviser Rev. A. C. McCall, Bunnlevel 

Adult Leader Miss Lillian- Draughon, Dunn, Rt. 1 

Young People's Leader ._. Truby Powell, Lillington 

Intermediate Leader... Mrs. E. L. Powell, Lillington, Rt. 3 

Junior Leader ...Miss Bessie McNeil, Broadway, Rt. 1 

Story Hour Leader Mrs. G. R. Connor, Kipling 

Group Leaders: 

Western .....Miss Irma Knight, Broadway, Rt. 1 

Northern .....W. E. Medlin, Holly Springs, Rt. 1 

Southern.... Rev. Julius Holloway, Lillington 

Eastern Rev. Forest Maxwell, Erwin 



LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 7 

7. STANDING COMMITTEES 

Presbytery and Pulpit: 

G. Van Stephens, Chm., Angier 
G. Scott Turner, Chalybeate Springs 
Forest Maxwell, Erwin 
Sam Hudson, Lillington 

Chm. on Christian Literature Mrs. L. Jackson, Erwin 

Chm. on Orphanage H. P. Strickland, Dunn 

Chm. on Missions.. ..Mrs. D. B. Andrews, Fuquay Springs, RFD 

Chm. on Temperance A. C. McCall, Bunnlevel 

Chm. on Baptist HospitaL W. D. Moore, Coats 

Chm. on Ministers Annuities Mrs. J. G. Layton, Lillington 

Chm. on Christian Education J. W. Angell, Buie's Creek 

Chm. on American Bible Society Mrs. W. E. Nichols, Coats 



LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



LIST of MESSENGERS " 

ANGIER C. W. Flowers, W. M. Morgan, Mrs. L. E. Johnson. 

ANTIOCH Mrs. H. M. O'Quinn, H. G. Patterson, Mrs. 

Lloyd Brown, Lee O'Ouinn, Mrs. Frank Brown. 

BAPTIST CHAPEL A. L. Smith, Deas Dickens, Malcolm 

"'^''' Dickens,' J. M. Dickens, Miss Rena Thomas. 

H/Vt^TIST GR6vE--Mrs. Velma Lewter, Ernest Lewter, 
W:D: Howell, Lester Bullock, R. W'. Wester. 

BETHEL James Flowers, Mrs. James Flowers, Leland Mat- 
thews, Mrs. Leland Matthews, W. P. West. 

BR-PADWAY Milto^ Thomas, RaJph^Sikes, Leslie Pittman, 

p. J. Thomas, Floyd Thomas. 

BUIE'S CREEK J. W. Angell, B. F. McLeod, T. T. Lanier, 

Mrs. B. P. Marshbanks, Mrs. I. K. Stafford. 

CHALYBEATE SPRINGS R. W. McDonald, Mrs. E. W. 

Smith, Mrs. R. W. McDonald, E. W. Smith, James Tudor. 

COATS Owen Odum, Mrs. W. E. Nichols, Alton Grimes, 

Miss Mattie Bain, Mrs. Owen Odum. 

CUMBERLAND UNION Mrs. Thomas Sears, Mrs. Ralph 

Clark, Louis Weathers, Jesse Weathers, Mrs. Cornelia 
Abernathy. 

DUNN, FIRST C. D. Bain, J. M. Morgan, Mrs. Billy Hodges, 

Mrs. R. H. Duncan, Sr., Miss Lillian Draughon. 

DUNN, SECOND M. B. Faircloth, Mrs. R. B. Wright, Mrs. 

Herbert Haire. 

EAST ERWIN Herbert McLamb, W. C. Stone, Mrs. C. M. 

Baker, Mrs. W. J. Davis, Mrs. Eula Moore. 

ERWIN, FIRSF Forest Maxwell, N. R. Sanderson, Mrs. 

N. R. Sanderson, Mrs. L. R. Stancil. 

FRIENDSHIP Archibald Byrd, W. F. Jones, Mrs. C. W. 

Strickland, Mrs. W. F. Jones, Mrs. F. M. Allen. 

HARMONY John H. Morgan, S. A. Lanier, H. S. Hedge- 

peth, Mrs. A. F. Currin. 

HOLLY SPRINGS Hirom Thomas, J. E. Baker, Walter 

Wilson, Mrs. D. J. Patterson, Miss Myrtle Thomas. 



LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 9 

KENNEBEC M. T. Olive, Waymon Howard, W. R. Up- 
church, Rayford Smith, Mrs. lola Hare. 

LILLINGTON J. C. Bullock, J. E. Womble, Tommy 

Thomas. , 

MACEDONIA J. E. Holt, S. M. Hobby, Frank Garner, Mrs. 

J. E. Holt, Mrs. Lena Smith. 

NEILL'S CREEK Allen Matthews, Jesse Keith, Mrs. Hugh 

Johnson, J. O. McLeod, Berles Johnson. 

OAK GROVE Mrs. Mamie Avery, J. B. Dupree, Mrs. E. P. 

Gaskin, Curtis Byrd, Hovie W. Pope. 

Piney Grove H. T. Lawrence. I, L. Howell, M. D. Honey- 

cutt, Edd Smith, J. L. Atkins. 

PLEASANT MEMORY S. W. Turlington, Mrs. S. W. Tur- 
lington, Mrs. Judd Ennis, Mrs. T. H. Penny, Mrs. Carlie 
McLamb. 

RAWLS 1. D. Smith, O. D. Sherman, T. H. Gardner, Thomas 

Moore, Beatrice Rawls. 

SWANN'S STATION Robert Godfrey, Mrs. Robert God- 
frey, J. R. Batchelor, O. R. Link. Mrs. W. B. Castleburry. 



10 LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 

CONSTITUTION 

1. This association shall be known as "Little River Baptist 
Association." 

2. The object of this association shall be the advancement of 
the Kingdom of Christ, and the means of accomplishing this shall 
be in strict conformity with the principles of the New Testament. 

3. The association shall have no authority over the internal 
right of any church belonging to it and shall act only as an advisory 
council. 

4. The association shall be composed of messengers chosen 
by the churches connected with it, each church being entitled to 
five delegates. Ordained ministers having oversight of churches 
in the association, or having their membership in these churches, 
shall also be received as messengers. 

5. A quorum shall consist of messengers from a majority of 
the churches of the association. 

6. The delegates from each church to the annual meeting of 
the association shall bear a letter certifying their appointment and 
giving an account of the condition of the church and a statement 
of all funds contributed for local and benevolent purposes. 

7. The officers of the association shall be a moderator, a 
vice-moderator, a clerk and a treasurer, who shall be chosen an- 
nually from the members composing the association, and shall 
continue in office until their successors are elected. The term 
of office of the moderator shall begin at the conclusion of the ses- 
sion at which he is elected and continue until the close of the next 
annual meeting. 

8. It shall be the duty of the moderator to preside during 
the deliberations of the body, to enforce the observance of the 
constitution, preserve the decorum, appoint committees except when 
other provisions are made for their appointment, decide all ques- 
tions of order, giving his opinion on any question under discussion, 
and cast the deciding vote in case of a tie. 

9. It shall be the duty of the clerk to record the proceedings 
of each annual meeting of the association, superintend the print- 
ing of the minutes and their distribution among the churches. 

10. It shall be the auty of the treasurer to receive all funds 
sent by the churches or collected during the sessions of this body 
and to disburse the same for the objects stated. He shall present 
a report on all funds administered by him at each annual meeting. 



LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 11 



n. The association shall appoint, annually, a Promotion Com- 
mittee composed of one m.ember from each church in the associa- 
tion and the pastors of the churches. The moderator shall be 
chairman of this committee. The function of this committee shall 
be the promotion of Associational plans through the several 
churches. 

12. The association shall appoint annually an Executive Com- 
mittee of 12 members, among whom by virtue of their office are 
to be the moderator, vice-moderator, clerk-treasurer, S. S. Supt. 
of the Association, Training Union Director, W. M. U. Superin- 
tendent, Supt. of Evangelism, the Associational Missionary. This 
committee shall have general supervision of the affairs of the as- 
sociation during the interval between the meetings of the bocjy; 
shall seek to promote the welfare of the churches, and their active 
participation in the causes fostered by the denomination; but shall 
be answerable to the association for its acts, and make an annual 
report to the association of its work. 

13. The association in annual meeting shall appoint a pres- 
bytery of four members to sit with the pastor of any person whose 
ordination is sought, and the moderator of the association, to 
examine the qualifications and opportunities for work of the can- 
didate. 

14. The association shall hold an annual meeting commenc- 
ing on Tuesday after the fourth Sunday in October. 

15. A meeting of the association may be called by the mod- 
erator at any time by the consent of five members of the Exe- 
cutive committee. Each church shall be notified of such a meet- 
ing in time to send delegates. 

16. This association shall have the right to exclude from its 
membership any church that departs from New Testament prin- 
ciples. 

17. Any church desinng to become a member of this asso- 
.ciation may present a petition at the annual meeting of the body 
through delegates appointed for this purpose. If the association 
shall consent to receive such church the moderator shall extend 
the hand of fellowship to the delegates. 

18. The association may invite visitors to seats and extend 
to them all the privileges of the delegates except that of voting. 

19. By appointment, at each annual meeting, an introductory 
sermon, and a sermon or address on missions shall be delivered. 

20. This constitution may be amended at any annual ses- 
sion, by a vote of two-thirds of the delegates present, provided 
that notice shall be given before the day that such motion will be 
presented. 



12 LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 

PROCEEDINGS 

MORNING SESSION 

L Moderator L. H. Campbell called the Association to 
order at the Rawls Church at 9:30 A. M., October 25, 1949 and 
services began by the singing o£ "All Hail the Power of Jesus' 
Name." 

2. Moderator Campbell spoke of his delight at the meet- 
ing of the Association in the Rawls Church. The Association 
met with the same Church twelve years before in 1937. 

3. The devotional was led by Brother Ernest P. Russell, 
new pastor of the First Baptist Church in Dunn. He used as 
his text portions of scripture from Acts 1 and 2. 

4. The roll of the churches was called and all churches 
were represented except Friendship and Layton's Chapel. 

5. On motion of Brother Julius HoUoway those present 
constituted the Seven tyTourth Annual Session of the Little 
River Baptist Association. 

6. The following new pastors were recognized: Rev. 
G. Van Stcj:)hens, Angicr; Rev. Ernest P. Russell, Dunn; Dr. 
J. W. Angell, Buie's Creek; Rev. I. K. Stafford, Rawls. Other 
recogni/.ed visitors were: Miss Marjorie Spence, Mrs. J. W. 
Womble, Mr. and Mrs. Stephens from Holly Springs, Mr. Earl 
Bradley and Mrs. LaFayette Holloman. 

7. Motion was made and passed that we accept the pro- 
gram for our day's activities. 

8. Brother E. C. Ruff in read the report on our Baptist 
Orphanage for Mrs. Leslie Pittman, Chairman of the Orphan- 
age work. The report adopted reads as follows: 

REPORT ON BAPTIST ORPHANAGE 

From the beginning of our religious history, God has instruc- 
ted us to care for the "orphans" among us. In North Carolina they 
are cared for through the Mills Home at Thomasville, the Kennedy 
Home at Kinston, through Mother's Aid and foster homes. 

No agency is able to provide a mother's care or substitute for 
a Christian home, yet we attempt with God's help to provide a 
Christian up-bringing for the homeless children of our State. It is 
a tragedy of our age that many of these are made homeless, not 



LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 13 



by the death of parents but by divorce, whiskey, and other modern 
evils. 

Some mothers are enabled to keep their children with them 
through the Mother's Aid plan, which plan also costs the denomi- 
nation less than admission to the orphanage. 

Some children are placed in foster homes under supervision 
of the orphanage. For others, supervision of case workers has 
brought about changes in the homes, whereby children are able to 
remain with one or both parents. 

Still there remain more children seeking admission to the or- 
phanage than can be taken care of, although over 700 were cared 
for by our agencies last year. The orphanage is supported by 
monthly offerings in the various churches and a special offering 
at Thanksgiving. We should pray God's help in enlarging our of- 
ferings, to the end that one of these little ones need not be turned 
from our door. We as individuals should examine our hearts to find 
out if we are building real Christian homes for ourselves and our 
families. 

Respectfully submitted, 
MRS. LESLIE PITTMAN 

9. In the absence of Brother Leary Knight, Chairman, 
Brother C. E. Ruffin read the re})on on the Baptist Hospital. 
The report adopted reads as shown below: 

REPORT ON BAPTIST HOSPITAL 

The Baptists of the Little River Association and North Caro- 
lina attempt to follow our Master's example and teachings by car- 
ing for the physical as well as the spiritual well-being of our 
brothers and neighbors. At our State Baptist Hospital at Winston- 
Salem the sick are cared for whether they be laich, poor, or middle 
class. 

We, the individual members of the churches, share in this heal- 
ing ministry through our gifts to the cooperative program and the 
Mother's Day offering. But our gifts fall far short of the needs for 
additional space, equipment, etc. The sick are turned from our 
doors, because we haven't room for them. We should strive to in- 
crease our offerings for this worthy cause. 

In addition to offering treatment to the sick, the hospital main- 
tains one of the best schools of nursing in the South. Girls are in- 
vited to train there — mentally, physically, and spiritually — for a 
Christian career of healing. 

At the hospital a Department of Religion is organized for visi- 
tation and counsel among the sick, Bible instruction among the 
students, and a link between the hospital and bhurches- throughout 
the state. 



14 LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 

With the facilities of the Bowman Gray School of Medicine, 
located on the grounds of the Baptist hospital, we have available 
some of the best medical counsel and treatment in the country. 

We should regard ourselves as singularly blessed by God in 
having these advantages, and pray that we may become a blessing 
to others through our gifts to the hospital. 

Respectfully submitted, 
LEARY KNIGHT 

10. Brother Richard Young was recognized as representa- 
tive from the Baptist Hospital in Winston-Salem. He gave a 
challenging address on behalf of relief to suffering humanity. 

11. A committee was appointed to make recommenda- 
tions on the matter of accepting the Duncan Baptist Church 
into the Association. Rev. G. Scott Turner, chairman, Mr. 
Berles Johnson, and H. O. Austin constituted the committee. 

12. The Moderator appointed the following committees: 
Time, Place and Preacher: 

Forest Maxwell, J. H. Morgan, H. C. Ousley 

Organization: 

R. E. Moore, L. L. Coats, Tom White, 
Mrs. D. B. Andrews, Mrs. G. V. Stephens. 

Resolutions: 
Miss Lillian Draughon, Aaron Rogers, J. C. Holt. 

13. Dr. L. L. Carpenter was recognized as a representative 
from the Biblical Recorder. He spoke inspiringly for The Re- 
corder and other Christian literature. 

14. Mrs. W. E. Nichols was recognized and read her re- 
port on the American Bible Society. The report reads as follows: 

REPORT ON AMERICAN BIBLE SOCIETY 

I'm sure that each church in our Association observed Ameri- 
can Bible Society Day. If you did not, I urge you to do so this com- 
ing year in a fine way. 

Each church should give at least these amounts each year: 
Country and village churches, $10.00 to $25.00; 
Churches in small cities, $25.00 to $100.00; 
Larger churches, $100.00 to $200.00. 
A German boy who never owned a Bible until he received one 
sent by The American Bible Society wrote: "I took it home and my 
parents asked me to read them something. This was the first time 
in our family life that we joined in Bible reading. I am happy and 
the whole life of our family is now changed." 



LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 15 

The Japanese people have turned to the Bible with an interest 
without parallel in all history. The ending of the war opened lands 
which for years were denied the Bible. The Bible shortage is esti- 
mated to be 20 million Bibles and 40 million New Testaments. 

It was David Livingston who said — "All that I am I owe to 
Jesus Christ revealed to me in his Divine Book." 

How well we can say with Seldon — ^"There is no Book on which 
we can rest in a dying moment but the Bible." 

Yes, in our precious Bible we find the wonderful words of life. 

Respectfully submitted, 
EVA M. NICHOLS (Mrs. W. E.) 

15. Brother E. C. Keller, chairman, was recognized and 
read his report on our State Baptist Colleges, which report was 
accepted and reads as follows: 

REPORT ON CHRISTIAN EDUCATION 

The Baptists of North Carolina own and operate two senior 
colleges, and five junior colleges, including Chowan, which was 
reopened September 1949. Also the Bowman Gray School of Medi- 
cine and The School of Nursing of the Baptist Hospital. 

The enrollment in these colleges has been increasing rapidly 
for the past few years. Six of these colleges: Wake Forest, Mere- 
dith, Mars Hill, Campbell, Gardner Webb and Wingate reached last 
year a enrollment peak of 5,481. However, many students who made 
application for entrance into these colleges had to be turned away 
for lack of room and adequate equipment. 

This increased attendance has been brought about, in part, 
by the recognition of the need for higher education, and the stimu- 
lus created by the GI program of the Federal Government to vete- 
rans. 

The need for expansion both in equipment and an enlarged 
financial program is being emphasized for the following causes: 
especially the termination of the GI program of the Federal Govern- 
ment and the increased appropriations of the State to State-owned 
colleges. 

Because the GI program is fast coming to an end greater appro- 
priations than heretofore are sorely needed. The appropriations 
of the State are so much greater than that of the Baptists to Bap- 
tist colleges that the Baptist colleges cannot cope with the State 
colleges, unless we increase our gifts to Christian education. 

It is gratifying that our people are seeing and meeting these 
needs in a small way. This is being evidenced by the removal and 



16 LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 

expansion of Wake Forest, the expansion of Gardner Webb, the 
program of expansion for Campbell, and the reopening of Chowan. 
Yet we must keep ever on, for the task is far from complete. 

Respectfully submitted, 
E. C. KELLER, Chairman 

16. In the absence of the scheduled representative, the 
Association recognized President Leslie Campbell who spoke 
in behalf of Campbell College and of the Baptist Team of 
Colleges in North Carolina. 

17. Mrs. D. B. Andrews was recognized to give her report 
on the W. M. U. work during the year. This report follows: 

REPORT ON WOMAN'S MISSIONARY UNION 

"To make known to the sons of men His mighty acts, and the 
glory of the majesty of His Kingdom." Psalm 145:12. Thus the 1949 
watchword of Woman's Missionary Union expresses the purpose of 
our organization. We are privileged to be "Laborers together with 
God", "that the world may know." 

During the past year Woman's Missionary Union is happy to 
report a gain in organizations and membership. We have had an 
increase of 13 organizations, 1 new W. M. S. and 12 new Young 
People's organizations. Among all organizations we had an increase 
in membership of 556. Thus far our increase in gifts has not kept 
pace with our increase in membership, but as these new members 
begin to bring their tithes and offerings into the storehouse, our 
goals will be met. 

Four executive meetings have been held, one taking the form 
of a Leadership Conference which was held in the Antioch Church 
last January. It was then that our plans were made for the new 
year. The women of the Antioch Church provided for our every 
need during the day. 

One of the highlights of our year was our annual meeting held 
in the Piney Grove Church in April. The attendance was splendid, 
the program inspiring, and the hospitality gracious. Several of our 
women attended our State meeting in Elizabeth City in March. On 
October 4th our Association entertained the entire Raleigh Division 
in the First Baptist Church in Dunn, where the women from nine 
associations met for an all-day session. 

On September 16th our Young People's Rally was held in the 
Lillington Baptist Church under the leadership of Miss Marjorie 
Spence and Mrs. Robert L. Young. Our young people presented a 
program that would have done credit to people of any age. Our 
Association was honored last November when one of our Royal 
Ambassadors was asked to serve as a page at our Baptist State Con- 
vention in Charlotte. In July two of our boys had the wonderful 



LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 17 

privilege of attending the Young Men's Mission Conference at 
Ridgecrest. Many of our boys and girls attended our State camps 
and our Association had older boys and girls serving as counselors, 
and as staff member at Seaside, Fruitland and Ridgecrest. 

From the ranks of our young people come many who are dedi- 
cating their lives, so full of promise, to Christian service. We feel 
that this is a direct answer to our prayers for the advanced Foreign 
Mission programs. Shall we match the sacrifice of their young lives 
with our gifts of money, that they may be educated and sent to the 
fields of service? Can you think of any sacrifice too great for us to 
make, if our young people are willing to go? 

"Give of thy sons, and daughters, 

to bear the message glorious, 
Give of thy wealth to speed them 

on their way. 
Pour out thy soul for them in 

prayer victorious 
And all thou spendest, Jesus 

will repay." 

Respectfully submitted, 
MRS. D. B. ANDREWS 

18. Miss Marjorie Spence was recognized and she gave 
an inspiring address on missions. 

19. Reverend Earl L. Bradley was recognized and spoke 
fervently on the subject of missions. 

20. Brother I. K. Stafford, pastor of the Rawls Church, 
extended a cordial welcome to all the people assembled. He 
announced that the following churches assisted Rawls in the 
day's entertainment: Chslybeate Springs, Piney Grove, Baptist 
Grove and Lillington. 

21. Brother E. C. Keller, pastor of the Second Baptist 
Church of Dunn, was recognized to preach the annual sermon. 
His text was taken from the third chapter of Philippians. 

22. The benediction was pronounced by Brother Marsh- 
banks of Buie's Creek. He also gave thanks for the meal, after 
which we were adjourned for the lunch hour. 

AFTERNOON SESSION 

23. With the singing of the hymn "How Firm a Founda- 
tion" the afternoon session was opened. 

24. Mrs. Harvey O'Quinn was recognized to conduct the 
Memorial Service for our beloved dead. At the end of this ser- 
vice the congregation stood in memory of th- deceased as 
Brother Julius Holloway led in prayer. A list of the deceased 
may be found in the back of the minutes. 



18 LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 

25. The Clerk, J. M. Long, acted as moderator as Modera- 
tor Campbell gave his annual report. The report was well ac- 
cepted and following recommendations were adopted by the 
Association: 

RECOMMENDATIONS FROM MODERATOR'S REPORT 

1. That as an Association we employ with the financial assis- 
tance of the Baptist State Convention, a full-time missionary to 
promote our group organizations and assist in local church pro- 
grams. 

2. That each church be asked to continue support of this pro- 
gram on the basis of 3% of its budget, exclusive of special funds 
for building purposes. 

3. That we reaffirm our endorsement of organizing church 
fields for part-time churches, wherever feasible, in order that local 
pastors may be established among the churches of our Association. 

4. That a permanent pulpit committee b3 appointed to assist, 
upon request, churches seeking pastors, and to aid in the formation 
of church fields, when advisable. 

5. That we continue to offer the services of the Association 
to churches in the holding of church clinics for the purpose of dis- 
cussing the work of the local church. 

6. That our Executive Committee be asked to consider the 
advisability of inviting our young people to organize their own 
Baptist Youth Club of the Little River Association, with their own 
officers and program of activities. 

Respectfully submitted, 
LESLIE H. CAMPBELL 

26. Reverend Herbert M. Baker was recognized as a visi- 
tor from tlie Brunswick Association. He spoke on the Modera- 
tor's report in connection with The Baptist Youth Association. 

27. Reverend I. P Hedgpeth, age 91, of the Robeson 
Association was recognized as a visitor in our Association. 

28. Mrs. J. G. Layton, chairman of the Relief and An- 
nuity work was recognized, read her report as follows: 

REPORT OF THE RELIEF AND ANNUITY BOARD 

Reports reviewing the work of the Relief and Annuity Board 
of the Southern Baptist Convention showed last year to be one of 
remarkable achievement in service rendered and in increased assets. 
The total income was $3,888,740.40, with total benefits amounting 
to $1,292,341.84. Total assets as of December 31 were $15,094,093.60. 



LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 19 

During 1948, within S. B. C. territory, 2,297 new certificates were 
issued in all plans of the Annuity Board, 774 of them being in the 
Ministers Retirement Plan. The Widows Supplemental Annuity plan 
is now in force in all states of the Southern Baptist Convention with 
the exception of Tennessee and Florida, 

Every person gainfully employed in denominational work, 
whether ordained or lay worker, should be enrolled in one of the 
plans fostered by the Board, that when retirement age is reached 
or ill health impairs, there may be some income provided by mem- 
bership in one of the annunity plans. Pastors should make every 
effort to join the Retirement Plan. There is nothing else that can 
compare with it in the way of providing some income for old age. 
'To date, there are within the bounds of our state only 580 mem- 
bers, but there should be 1500! In North Carolina the Ministers Re- 
tirement Plan has been in operation since 1940. Since that time the 
ministers who are members, the churches they have served, and 
the Convention have laid aside more than $800,000. That money is 
drawing interest and will be used for paying annuities to ministers 
who retire ten or twenty years from now. Fifty-eight ministers 
have reached the age of retirement and are receiving annuities 
ranging from a small amount each month to the maximum of $90.00. 
There are also eleven widows receiving annuities. In the Widows 
Supplemental Annuity Plan there has been placed in this fund, by 
the members and the State Convention, more than $50,000. Already 
some widows are receiving benefits. 

Let it be understood that the relief fund of the Relief and An- 
nuity Board simply provides a pittance for those who need it, pro- 
vided the Board has it. This relief fund should be used solely for 
ministers who were well advanced in age when the Retirement Plan 
was inaugurated, and who could not enter the Retirement Plan. The 
ReUef Department of the Southern Baptist Convention reported 
last year that $237,252.09 was paid to 1,385 beneficiaries — an aver- 
age of 47 cents a day! In nine states more money was spent for re- 
lief than was received for relief in those states. 

It is urged that every church in Little River Association take a 
fellowship offering, preferably at the observance of the Lord's Sup- 
per, for the relief of aged and needy ministers. Unless this is done 
no increase can be granted and few new names can be added to the 
roll. 

Respectfully submitted, 
MAUDE C. LAYTON (Mrs. Joel G.) 

29. The Moderator and Reverend I. K. Stafford spoke 
briefly to the report by Mrs. Layton. 

30. A Panel Discussion, "Financing a Worthy Church 



20 LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 

Program," was conducted by Dr. J. W. Angell, Dr. C. D. Bain 
and Reverend Forest Maxwell. 

31. Brother L. L. Coats was recognized and gave the 
following report on the Training Union work for the past year: 

TRAINING UNION REPORT 

The Little River Association is pleased to report an addition 
of two Training Unions during the past year. At the present time 
there are sixteen of the twenty-seven churches with unions. In 
these churches we have 11 Story Hour Unions, 17 Junior Unions, 
12 Intermediate Unions, 15 Young People Unions, and 10 Adult 
Unions, with a total enrollment of 1046. 

We have held four executive committee meetings, and two asso- 
ciational meetings, with exceptional attendance. 

In an attempt to organize or bolster Training Union work in 
our association, your director and chorister, each with a group of 
young people, visited the following churches: Lillington, Pleasant 
Memory and Angier. 

We had entries in our memory work, sword drill, better speak- 
ers, scripture reading, and hymn singing tournament. 

Study courses were held in various Training Unions through- 
out the year. 

For the coming year we recommend; 

1. That each union put forth a special effort to have parti- 
cipants in each of the tournaments. 

2. An executive committee meeting once each quarter. 

3. The cooperation of all officers in every phase of our acti- 
vities. 

May we accept this challenge for the coming year. 

Respectfully submitted, 
L. L. COATS 

32. Brother Raymond Moore then gave his yearly report 
on the Sunday School work, as follows: 

SUNDAY SCHOOL REPORT 

The Associational S. S. organization has tried to help the 
schools in the individual churches by providing conferences, infor- 
mation, instruction, and encouragement. During the year 4 general 
conferences were held; 4 officers' meetings were held; two of our 
officers attended the State -wide administration clinic at Shelby; 
one attended the State V. B. S. Clinic at Fruitland, and an associ- 
ational clinic was held at Lillington. 

The emphasis in Sunday School work during the year has been 
on increased enrollment m the Schools, an expanded 5-point Bible 



LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 21 

teaching program, and soul-winning. In checking the reports, we 
find that most churches fell below their goals set at the first of the 
year. In the Association there were added 9 new departments dur- 
ing the year. Nineteen churches reported an enrollment gain of 603. 
Seven churches reported a loss of 168. The net gain was 435, or 
about 4% above the enrollment reported last year. The average at- 
tendance this year is 3190 as compared with 2859 last year. V. B. S. 
enrollment increased from 1776 to 2124. The attendance increased 
from 1612 to 1941. 

An Associational planning meeting was held on Oct. 3 with Mr. 
L. L. Morgan from Raleigh present. Twenty-seven were present 
representing 10 churches. We have plans to visit every church in 
the Association (upon invitation) and present the plans for the new 
year. Our slogan for the year is, "Take your family to Sunday 
School." 

We would like to make the following recommendations: 

1. That each superintendent give invitation for a team to 
visit his church in the near future. 

2. That each superintendent lead his people to accept worthy 
goals and make definite plans for the year. 

3. That the program and Calendar of Activities of the Sun- 
day School Board be adopted and followed, so far as practical, by 
each church. 

Respectfully submitted, 

R. E. MOORE, Assn'l Supt. 

33. Brother G. Scott Turner was recognized to give his 
report on Evangelism for the year. Along with his report he 
gave an inspirational address. 

34. Brother N. R. Sanderson was recognized to report on 
a mission in Erwin, which has recently been organized under 
the supervision of the First Baptist Church of Erwin. 

35. Reverend G. Scott Turner was recognized as chairman 
of the committee to consider the application of the Duncan 
Church for membership in the Association. The following re- 

, port was read and accepted, and Duncan Baptist Church be- 
came a fully recognized church in the Association by the vote 
of the messengers present. 

REPORT ON ADMISSION OF DUNCAN CHURCH 

Brother Moderator and Brethren: 

Your committee on the admission to membership in this 
Association of the Duncan Baptist Church has examined the cre- 
dentials of the church and found as follows: 

The church is located at Duncan, North Carolina in this (Har- 



22 LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 

nett) county. 

It was organized in March 1948 with a presbytery consisting of 
the Moderator of this Association, President L. H. Campbell, Associ- 
ational Missionay, Roger Johnson, and G. S. Turner, Sr. 

The covenant and articles of faith customarily used in Baptist 
churches were adopted. 

The church now has a membership of 72. 

They have an attractive building which is to be used as a Sun- 
day School building and a large auditorium under construction. 

The present pastor is G. Scott Turner, Jr. of Wake Forest, North 
Carolina. 

The church is missionary in spirit and has consistently support- 
ed the denominational program. 

We recommend that it be received into the membership of this 
Association. 

Respectfully submitted, 
G. S. TURNER, SR. 
H. O. AUSTIN 
BERLES C. JOHNSON 

36. An offering was taken for materials to be used by 
the Moderator in his work. 

37. The report of the committee on Time, Place and 
Preacher for the coming year was accepted as follows: The time 
is as specified in the constitution. The place is the Piney Grove 
Church. The preacher is Dr. J. W. Angell, pastor of the Buie's 
Creek Church; Rev. Ernest Russell, Dunn Church, Alternate. 

38. Miss Lillian Draughon gave the report of the Reso- 
lution Committee, which was adopted, as follows: 

REPORT OF COMMITTEE ON RESOLUTIONS 

When asked to send the first message by telegraph, the pri- 
vileged person said, "What hath God wrought!" So, believing that 
all good is the work of Gcd, the Committee on Resolutions, in be- 
half of the members of the Little River Association, wish to thank 
God for what he hath wrought here today and throughout the year. 

As did Paul for his friends, we thank God for the good people 
of Rawls, Macedonia, Chalybeate Springs, Piney Grove, Baptist 
Chapel, and Lillington, wiio have provided the two bountiful meals 
today. The beautiful surroundings; fine parking places, and all the 
other things arranged by the host church for our comfort and plea- 
sure, are a further cause for gratitude. 

We thank Him, most of all, for the splendid speakers and good 
reports heard today; and for their urgent challenge to us to advance 



LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 23 

as a cooperating team for the promotion of evangelism throughout 
the world. 

We are also grateful to God for the untiring efforts of the 
moderator, and of the other associational officers, to stimulate us 
to greater zeal throughout the year in promoting the advancement 
of God's Kingdom. Acknowledging with regret that we have done 
much too little in the past to back up their efforts, we now pledge 
to each of the new officers our increasing interest, prayers, and 
active support. 

While expressing our profound gratitude to God for victory in 
the recent Beer-Wine election, we urge that even greater effort 
be made to see that A. B. C. stores shall not be established in Har- 
nett County; and that this and every other social evil shall be op- 
posed to the fullest extent of our strength. 

Respectfully submitted, 

LILLIAN DRAUGHON, Chairman 

J. E. HOLT 

H. A. ROGERS, Committee 

39. jVIotion was made and passed that we ha\e a spring 
session of the Association for emphasis on e\angelism and in- 
spiration. 

40. Brother Raymond Moore, Chairman of Organizations 
Committee, was recognized and ga\e recommendations as to 
the new officers for next year. These officers were elected and 
their names are printed in the front of this book. 

41. Mrs. D. B. Andrews was recognized to gi\e recommen- 
dations of the Executive Committee, whicli were accepted, as 
follows: 

REPORT OF THE EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

1. We recommend that our association continue its program 
of associational missions, referring the matter to the Executive 
Committee to employ a missionary; that we continue to finance this 
program on a basis of gifts from the churches — each church giving 
to the associational fund 3% of its total contributions except build- 
ing funds. We recommend also that a committee be appointed to 
present this plan to the churches. 

2. We recommend that our association consider the forma- 
tion of a youth organization, for the purpose of studying and pre- 
senting the different phases of our work. 

3. We recommend that our association appoint an advisorv 



24 LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



pulpit committee and that the ordination committee be asked to 
serve in this capacity. 

Respectfully submitted, 
MRS. D. B. ANDREWS, 
Acting Secretary 
Executive Committee 

42. Brother J. C. Bullock was recognized and he gave his 
Treasurer's report for the Association for the year closing. The 
report follows: 

TREASURER'S REPORT 

RECEIPTS: 

Funds turned over to me and deposited — Jan. 3, 1949 $ 600.57 

Angler 116.10 

Antioch ._ 250.00 

Baptist Chapel ..- 9.00 

Baptist Grove 23.48 

Bethel 10.00 

Broadway .- — 

Buie's Creex. 200.00 

Chalybeate Springs 

Coats - 62.28 

Cumberland Union 10.00 

Dunn, 1st 625.00 

Dunn, 2nd 

Erwin, East 

Erwin, 1st. 

Friendship 100.00 

Harmony ..- 

Holly Springs 25.00 

Kennebec .- 

Layton's Chapel 

Lillington 100.00 

Macedonia _ 

Neill's Creek 

Oak Grove 

Piney Grove 

Pleasant Memory 

Rawls 

Swann's Station 15.00 

Duncan 

Baptist State Convention 800.00 



LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 25 

DISBURSEMENTS: 

Paid to Roger Johnson for postage 

June 17, 1949 $ 1.50 

Paid to Mr. Roger Johnson for services 

Rendered January through July 1949 2275.00 

April 14, 1949 — Check to Pope Printing 

Company for minutes 200.00 

April 29, 1949— Check to Carolina Type- 
writer Company , 90.00 

Totals $2566.50 $2946.43 

Balance in Bank Oct. 3, 1949 379.93 

$2946.43 $2946.43 
Respectfully submitted, 
J. C. BULLOCK 

43. The afternoon session adjourned with prayer by Dr. 
C. D. Bain. 

EVENING SESSION 

44. The Evening Session opened by the singing of the 
hymn "Jesus Saves," led by Reverend Raymond E. Moore. 

45. The devotional services were conducted by Reverend 
G. Van Stephens, pastor of the Angier Church. The devotions 
included responsive reading, prayer and hymns. 

46. Brother A. C. McCall was recognized to read his re- 
port on moral and social issues, which report follows: 

REPORT ON SOCIAL JUSTICE AND 
CIVIC RIGHTEOUSNESS 

I think that the weakest place in both religion and education 
today is the attitude of doing nothing about the application of the 
teachings of Jesus to society. Religion, like science, is not ideals to 
be believed or accepted, but deeds to be done. Jesus said, "He that 
heareth these sayings of mine, I will liken him unto a wise man 
that built his house on a rock. Dr. William James, possibly the 
greatest psychologist of ail times, said, "No matter how many good 
resolutions you form, no matter how many times you decide to do 
differently, it is never effective until you act." Certainly the par- 
ables of Jesus, the sermon on the mount, and his own prayers, all 
indicate that He believed there was a power in them to change the 
world. He expected the changes to come and laid the responsibility 
on his followers to apply them at whatever cost. He set the example 
for us to follow by dying rather than compromising with the world. 
I believe sincerely that if we would get rid of our prejudices, cow- 



26 LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 

ardice, and laziness, and give the Gospel of Jesus a chance, it 
would change the world. 

1. In our county we have started a movement against the 
great evil of alcohol which, please God, shall never end. Last Sep- 
tember 6 we voted the legal sale of beer and wine out of our county. 
I left the courthouse that night, saying to myself, "If the church 
folk would get together, we could do anything that ought to be 
Uone." I trust that this movement may be extended on the fifteeth 
of next month, as we vote against establishing an A. B. C. store in 
our county. 

2. Social justice and civic righteousness call us to take our 
stand without fear or favor" in the application of the Gospel of Christ 
to the saving of our homes. It may be that it is later than we think 
now. Undermining influences have brought such results as juvenile 
delinquency and caused Mr. Hoover, head of the F. B. I., almost to 
turn preacher as he appeals for religious training in the home. Due 
to the rapidly rising divorce rate a person recently advocated that 
the register of deeds in each county be furnished an application 
for divorce to be given to each person that applies for a marriage 
license, since he may soon need it. These inf uences may have ac- 
complished more than we think in the undoing of the greatest in- 
stitution in all the world. In' the year 1948 we had in North Carolina 
33,800 marriages and 6,600 divorces. 

3. What about Sabbath observance? Recently a car stopped 
in front of my church. A person got out with a cardboard two or 
three feet square advertismg automobile races between Dunn and 
Erwin, on Sunday afternoon, at which, I understand, there were 
thousands present. Our picture shows are wide-open on Sunday. 
The radio advertises them, praises the picture that you will see, and 
urges you to attend. Some business places all round are wide 
open on Sunday. In some instances the leaders of our churches ope- 
rate them or are renting them out for others to run. Sabbath ob- 
servance is almost a thing of the past. I should guess that these 
things which I have mentioned are exerting a greater influence on 
a greater number of folks each Sunday than our churches. 

4. Do we have prejudices, racial, religious, or poUtical? There 
has been a great deal of energy expended through the years trying 
to put God over in our corner. Peter tried hard to do just that, but 
one day on the top of Simon's house beside the sea, he made the 
greatest single discovery ever made in this world: he found out that 
God has no favorites. 

5. One of the pastors in our association, to his everlasting 
credit, led the way for us all to take in applying the Gospel against 
the deadly evil of gambling. He pointed out the deadly work it is 
doing and called upon the law enforcement officers to get busy and 
close up public places of gambling. 

6. Can we have social justice and civic righteousness with the 



LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATIO N 27 

economic thinking and actions of today? One group of people lives 
in luxury; the other, in poverty. What about those that tend the 
land, work in the dirt, and live in the average tenant house, while 
at the same time the man who owns the land lives in a comfortable 
house, and is a leader in our churches? I personally do not think 
that Jesus approves of such a system. 

Respectfully submitted, 

A. C. McCALL 

47. The Moderator recognized the Campbell College 
Choir, which presented three well-rendered selections under the 
direction of Mr. Allan Guy. 

48. Brother M. M. Jernigan was recognized to give an 
address on the alcoholic beverage situation in our county. 

49. Brother Charles Howard of Buie's Creek was recogniz 
ed to give an address on evangelism. His text was Daniel 12:3 

50. The Association was dismissed after the singing of 
"Blest Be the Tie," followed by prayer led by Brother O. W. 
Pulley, of East Erwin. 



28 LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



OUR BELOVED DEAD 



ANGIER— Mrs. J. W. Gardner, Mrs. Alex Hockaday. 

ANTIOCH— Mrs. R. L. Hunt, Mrs. Nancy E. Porter, Mrs. G. W. 
O'Quinn, Mr. W. M. O'Quinn, Mr. J. A. Dean, Mr. J. L. Sykes, 
Mr. Alton Thomas. 

BAPTIST CHAPEL— Mr. Erwin J. Thomas, Mr. Mallie G. Thomas. 
BAPTIST GROVE— Mrs. Nora Johnson, Mrs. Ida Johnson. 
BETHEL — Mrs. Annie Hamilton. 
BUIE'S CREEK— Mr. Grover G. Dean, Mr. Willie H. Reardon, Mr. 

G. G. Page (Deacon), Mr. A. C. Ennis, Mrs. A. C. Ennis, Mr. 

Tom Stewart. 
CHALYBEATE SPRINGS— Mr. C. K. Smith, Mrs. Doris Knight 

Ausley, Mr. Hobart Sanfird, Mr. Clem Hockaday. 
COATS— Mr. Maylon Denning, Dr. Fred H. Fleming. 
DUNN, FIRST— Mr. E. D. Upchurch, Mr. Jasper Wade, Mrs, M. B. 

Poole, Mr. J. B. Holland, Mr. S. E. Guy, Mr. Alex Bass, Mr. 

J. G. Upchurch 
EAST ERWIN— Mr. C. F. Lucas. 

ERWIN, FIRST— Mr. Gene Aiken, Mr. Rufus Smith. 
FRIENDSHIP— Mr. W. L. Byrd. 

HARMONY— Mrs. John Sills, Mrs. Floyd Johnson. 
HOLLY SPRINGS— Mr. B. B. Wilson. Mrs. Herman Thomas, Mrs. 

Horace Patterson. 
KENNEBEC— Mr. Herman Hudson, Mr. J. H. Price, Mr. O. D. 

Lyons. 
MACEDONIA— Mr. J. Wade Stephenson, Mr. J. W. Holt. 
NEILL'S CREEK— Mr. J. Harvey Morgan, Mrs. Mollie Babb, Mr. 

D. Mack Matthews. 
OAK GROVE— Mr. D. T. Pate, Mrs. Flora Matthews, Mr. Joe Dor- 
man, Mr. Albert L. Sercy. 
PINEY GROVE— Miss Bertie Thornberg, Mrs. John L. Godwin, 

Mrs. S. B. Adcock. 
PLEASANT MEMORY— Mrs. Robert Jones. 
RAWLS— Mr. R. F. Jones (Deacon), Mr. O. B. Weathers. 
SWANN'S STATION— Mrs. H. A. Calcutt, Mrs. Mary E. Frye. 



LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 29 

ORDAINED MINISTERS 

Name Address Church Membership Work 

J. W. Angell, Buie's Creek Buie's Creek Pastor 

J. L. Atkins, Raleigh, Rt. 4 ? Pastor 

R. E. Atkins, 27 Dixie Trail, Raleigh.. ? Pastor 

J. E. Ayscue, Buie's Creek Buie's Creek Retired 

A. Paul Bagby, Buie's Creek Buie's Creek Retired 

J. F. Blackmon, Buie's Creek Buie's Creek Retired 

R. T. Bray, Wake Forest, Rt..l ? Pastor 

W. T. Campbell, Fqy. Sprgs., Rt. 2....Neill's Creek Retired 

C. T. Gray, New Hill, Rt. 3 ? Pastor 

R. F. Hall, Lillington Lillington Inactive 

A. C. Hayes, Spring Lake ? Pastor 

Julius Holloway, Lillington Lillington Inactive 

Charles B. Howard, Buie's Creek Buie's Creek Pastor 

Sam F. Hudson, Lillington Lillington Pastor 

B. W. Jackson, Angier Angier State Worker 

E. C. Keller, Dunn Dunn, Second Pastor 

J. M. Long, Coats........ Coats Pastor 

Lester Mann, Durham, Rt. 4 Macedonia .... Licensed Pastor 

Forest Maxwell, Erwin Erwin, First Pastor 

A. C. McCall, Bunnlevel Friendship Pastor 

R. E. Moore, Mamers Antioch Pastor 

Henry Morgan Harmony ? 

O. W. Pulley, Erwin East Erwin Pastor 

C. E. Ruffin, Broadway Broadway Pastor 

Ernest P. Russell, Dunn........ Dunn, First Pastor 

, G. Van Stephens, Angier Angier Pastor 

G. Scott Turner, Sr., Kipling Chalybeate Springs .... Pastor 

G. Scott Turner, Jr., Wake Forest ? Pastor 

Tom W. White, Rolesville ? Pastor 

Alvis Whitted, Fuquay Springs... ? Pastor 

MINISTERS LICENSED THIS YEAR 

Name Address Church 

Thurman Smith, Wake Forest .-.. Chalybeate Springs 

Carroll Barbour, Wake Forest Dunn, First 

James Ferrell Sugg, Wake Forest Dunn, First 

L. M. Yates, Bunnlevel Layton's Chapel 

A. C. Atkinson, Spring Lake Layton's Chapel 

MINISTERS ORDAINED THIS YEAR 

Name Address Church 

G. Scott Turner, Jr., Wake Forest Chalybeate Springs 



30 LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 

STUDENTS FOR THE MINISTRY 

Name Church Address 

Carroll Barbour, Dunn Wake Forest 

Jack W. Byrd, Erwin, First --. Louisville 

Thomas Faircloth, Erwin, First Louisville 

Alton Hays, Bethel ._._ ? 

Carroll C. Jones, Buie's Creek Campbell 

T. M. Mishoe, Buie's Creek Campbell 

Dan V. Morgan, Buie's Creek Campbell 

Roy Parker, Buie's Creek ? 

Linwood Ragan, Piney Grove _ ........Campbell 

Odell Scott, Buie's Creek Campbell 

Thurman Smith, Chalybeate Springs ...Wake Forest 

James F. Sugg, Dunn Wake Forest 

B. F. Thomas, Buie's Creek Campbell 

C. F. Thomas, Buie's Creek Campbell 

G. Scott Turner, Jr., Chalybeate Springs Wake Forest 



CHOIR DIRECTORS 

Angier Mrs. Roy Williams. Jr Angler 

Antioch Mr. H. G. Patterson Mamers 

Bethel Leland F. Matthews Linden, Rt. 1 

Broadway H. A. Thomas Broadway 

Buie's Creek Allan Guy Buie's Creek 

Chalybeate Springs -T. L. Caviness Fuquay Springs, Rt. 1 

Coats Mrs F. H. Fleming Coats 

Dunn, First Mrs. M. M. Jernigan Dunn 

Dunn, Second B. O. Slaughter Dunn, Rt. 1 

East Erwin W. C. Stone Erwin 

Erwin, First Mrs. C. L. Byrd ....Erwin 

Friendship Archibald Byrd Bunnlevel 

Harmony Andrew Yarbrough ........Lillington 

Holly Springs Willie Nordon Broadway 

Kennebec H. T. McLean Coats, Rt. 1 

Layton's Chapel Hartwell Butts Bunnlevel 

Lillington Mrs. Ruth Brown Lillington 

Macedonia Leo Weathers Holly Springs, Rt. 1 

Neill's Creek ..:..... L. G. Johnson Lillington 

Piney Grove C. D. Jones Ill Boylan Ave., Raleigh 

Rawls Henry Rawls Fuquay Springs, Rt. 1 

Swann's Station R. A, Wilson ....Sanford, Rt. 6 



LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 31 

PIANISTS OR ORGANISTS 

Angler Mrs. Marshall Morgan Angler 

Antioch Miss Margie Stewart ..- Llllington, Rt. 3 

Baptist Chapel Miss Nellie Howard Sanford, Rt. 7 

Baptist Grove .Mrs. Maude Lou Rogers ....Fuquay Spgs., Rt. 1 

Bethel Mrs. H. W. Blalock Linden, Rt. 1 

Broadway .---.... Miss Laura Rosser Broadway 

Buie's Creek Mrs. A. E. Lynch Buie's Creek 

Chalybeate Springs ..Mrs. W. M. Pearson Chalybeate Springs 

Coats Mrs. Clem Godwin Coats 

Cumberland Union ..Mrs. Thomas Sears .Fuquay Springs, Rt. 1 

Dunn, First Mrs. C. C. Upchurch Dunn 

Dunn, Second . -. Miss Helen Wright Dunn, Rt. 1 

East Erwin Mrs. Kathleen Barefoot Erwln 

Erwin, First — Miss Ellen R. Davis Erwln 

Friendship Mrs. Roy Jones Bunnlevel 

Harmony ......Mrs. George R. Souders Llllington, Rt. 1 

Holly Springs Miss Dorothy Brown .....Mamers 

Lilllngton Mrs. J. T. Long .....Llllington, Rt. 1 

Macedonia Mrs. Lena Smith Holly Springs, Rt. 1 

Neill's Creek Mrs. Ada Smith .Llllington, Rt. 1 

Oak Grove Mrs. Ada Denton ....... Lilllngton, Rt. 1 

Piney Grove Mrs. Clara Adcock ...Holly Springs, Rt. 1 

Pleasant Memory Mrs. Carlie McLamb Coats, Rt. 1 

Rawls Mrs. Clinton Abernathy Fuquay Springs 

Swann's Station ........Mrs. Bessie Taylor .Sanford, Rt. 6 

LIBRARIANS 

Antioch Miss Hazel Weaver -Llllington, Rt. 2 

Dunn, First Miss Ruth Thomas .-- Dunn 

Holly Springs ............Miss Nellie Wilson -. Broadway 

Swann's Station Miss Hattie L. Laws Sanford, Rt. 6 






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POPE PRINTING CO., DUNN. N, C. 



LITTLE RIVER 

BAPTIST 

ASSOCIATION 

North Carolina 



Seventy-Fifth Annual Session 

Meeting Witin 

PINEY GROVE BAPTIST CHURCH 

October 24th, 1950 

The next regular session of the Association will meet with 

the Buie's Creek Baptist Church on Tuesday after the 

fourth Sunday in October, 1951 

The annual sermon will be preached by Rev. Ernest P. Russell 
Rev. G. Vann Stephens, Alternate 



LITTLE RIVER 

BAPTIST 

ASSOCIATION 

North Carolina 

» 

Seventy-Fifth Annual Session 

Meeting With 

PINEY GROVE BAPTIST CHURCH 

October 24th, 1950 

The next regular session of the Association will meet with 

the Buie's Creek Baptist Church on Tuesday after the 

fourth Sunday in October, 1951 

The annual sermon will be preached by Rev. Ernest P. Russell 
Rev. G. Vann Stephens, Alternate 



LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



INDEX 



ASSOCIATIONAL DIRECTORY 5 

CHOIR DIRECTORS 37 

CHURCH DIRECTORS 36 

CONSTITUTION 10 

HISTORICAL TABLE BEGINS 39 

OUR BELOVED DEAD 35 

ORDAINED MINISTERS 36 

LICENSED MINISTERS 36 

LIBRARIANS 38 

LIST OF MESSENGERS 8 

PROCEEDINGS .....12 

PROGRAM 13 

PIANIST OR ORGANISTS 38 

STATISTICAL TABLES BEGIN 39 

STUDENTS FOR THE MINISTRY 37 

REPORTS 

AMERICAN BIBLE SOCIETY 18 

BAPTIST ORPHANAGE 25 

BAPTIST TRAINING UNION 31 

CHRISTIAN EDUCATION 33 

MINISTERIAL RELIEF 20 

MODERATOR'S REPORT 14 

RESOLUTIONS COMMITTEE 27 

SOCIAL SERVICE REPORT 21 

SUNDAY SCHOOL 32 

TREASURER'S REPORT 28 




DR. P. G. PARKER 

To Whom This Annual Is Dedicated By Order Of The 
Executive Board Of The Association 

Born August 11, 1894, Potecasi, Northampton County, son of 
the late Norfleet and Bettie Gatling Parker. Educated at Wake 
Forest and Medical College of Virginia, graduating from latter 
in 1916. Following his graduation he entered the Navy serving 
as Lieutenant in the Medical Corps from 1917 to 1919. Served as 
Health Officer in Northampton County from 1919 to 1925, v/hen 
he resigned to enter private practice in Erwin. He became associ- 
ated with Dr. W. P. Holt on the staff of Good Hope Hospital, and 
became Chief of Staff in 1945. Member of Harnett County and North 
Carolina State Medical Societies, Fellow in the American Medical 
Association, and the American Academy of General Practitioners. 
Member of State Board of Medical Examiners 1944 to 1950, mem- 
ber of Harnett County Board of Health for past twelve years, 
recently elected as Harnett County's "Physician of the Year." 
Besides his medical affiliations he had been a member of the Erwin 
School Board for twenty years, a Director in the Bank of Harnett, 
a Deacon and Trustee in the Erwin Baptist Church, a Mason, and 
member of the American Legion. 



4 LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 

If it can be said of anyone that he completely gave himself 
away for others, then it can be said of Dr. P. G. Parker. He 
lived only for the welfare of others. His love and interest in all 
people caused multitudes to come to him, not only for the heal- 
ing of the body, but for advice on problems of everyday living. 
He was a leader in the field of medicine, but everywhere, it was 
said of him, "Dr. Parker is a good man." 



LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 5 

DIRECTORY 
of The Association 

1. GENERAL OFFICERS OF THE ASSOCIATION 

Moderator L. H. Campbell, Buie's Creek 

Vice-Moderator Dr. A. Paul Bagby, Buie's Creek 

Clerk W. A. Johnson, Lillington 

Treasurer J. C. Bullock, Lillington 

2. EXECUTIVE BOARD MEMBERS 

Moderator L. H. Campbell, Buie's Creek 

Vice-Moderator Dr. A. Paul Bagby, Buie's Creek 

Clerk W. A. Johnson, Lillington 

S. S. Superintendent Julius Holloway, Lillington 

B. T. U. Director B. O. Slaughter, Dunn 

W. M. U. President Mrs. D. B. Andrews, Fuquay Springs 

Supt. of Evangelism G. Scott Turner, Kipling 

E. P. Russell Dunn 

J. Ben Eller Coats 

Berles C. Johnson Lillington, Rt. 1 

D. B. Dean Lillington 

3. ASSOCIATIONAL MISSIONARY 

Rev. R. E. Moore Lillington 

4. W. M. U. ASSOCIATIONAL OFFICERS 

Superintendent Mrs. D. B. Andrews, Fuquay Springs 

Associate Supt Mrs. Beulah B. Dula, Kipling 

Secretary-Treasurer Mrs. Harvey M. O'Quinn, Mamers 

Young People's Leader Mrs. R. E. Moore, Lillington 

Royal Ambassador Counselor Julius Holloway, Lillington 

Mission Study Chairman Mrs. D. C. Woodall, Erwin 

Stewardship Chairman Miss Lillian Draughon, Dunn, Rt. 5 

Margaret Fund Chm Mrs. L. B, Smith, Fuquay Springs, Rt. 2 

Training School Chairman Mrs. Forrest Maxwell, Erwin 

Literature Chairman Mrs. L. Jackson, Erwin 

White Cross Chairman Mrs. W. E. Nichols, Coats 



6 LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 

5. ASSOCIATIONAL SUNDAY SCHOOL OFFICERS 

Superintendent Julius Holloway, Lillington 

Enlargement Rev. E. P. Russell, Dunn 

Training Mrs. G. Van Stephens, Angier 

Evangelism Rev. G. Scott Turner, Kipling 

Vacation Bible School Irvin Stephens, Lillington, Rt. 2 

Secretary Mrs. Pauline Denning, Lillington 

Departmental Superintendents: 

Extension Mrs. Leslie Turlington, Buie's Creek 

Adult Paul Strickland, Dunn 

Young People George Williams, Dunn 

Intermediate Mrs. Carl Gregory, Bunnlevel 

Juniors Miss Zula Rogers, Mamers 

Primary Miss Mamie Haighwood, Lillington 

Beginner Mrs. Willie Dean, Lillington 

Cradle Roll Mrs. H. M. O'Quinn, Mamers 

Nursery Mrs. C. L. Guy, Dunn 

Group Leaders: 

Northern Mrs. Mack Stevens, Fuquay Springs 

Northeastern.. Dr. C. D. Bain; W. M. Morgan, Angier 

Southern Mrs. George Sanders, Lillington, Rt. 2 

Western R. U. McNeill, Broadway, Rt. 1 

6. ASSOCIATIONAL B. T. U. OFFICERS 

Director B. O. Slaughter, Dunn, Rt. 1 

Associate Director Truby Powell, Lillington 

Secretary-Treasurer Miss Gay Lee, Dunn 

Chorister W. L. Thames, Dunn 

Pianist Miss Jo Hacket, Dunn 

Pastor-Adviser Rev. A. C. McCall, Bunnlevel 

Department Leaders: 

Story Hour Mrs. Thurman Collins, Mamers 

Junior Leader Miss Bessie McNeill, Broadway, Rt. 1 

Intermediate Leader Mrs. E. L. Powell, Lillington, Rt. 3 

Young People's Leader Mrs. Perry Langston, Buie's Creek 

Adult Leader Miss Lillian Draughon, Dunn, Rt.5 

Group Leaders: 

Miss Irma Knight, Broadway, Rt. 1 
Mrs. Edith Potter, Chalybeate Springs 
L. L. Coats, Dunn 
David Jones, Bunnlevel 



LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 7 

7. STANDING COMMITTEES 

Presbytery and Pulpit: 

G. Van Stephens, Chairman, Angier 

John E. Ayscue, Buie's Creek 

Sam F. Hudson, Lillington 

A. Paul Bagby, Buie's Creek 

Chm. on Christian Literature Mrs. L. Jackson, Erwin 

Chm. on Hospital Dr. A. W. Peede, Lillington 

Chm. on Missions.. ..Mrs. D. B. Andrews, Fuquay Springs, Rt. 2 

Chm. on Temperance Rev. A. C. McCall, Bunnlevel 

Chm. on Associates.. ..M. M. Jernigan, Dunn; S. F. Hudson, Lill. 

Chm. on Ministers Annuities Dr. C. D. Bain, Dunn 

Chm. on Christian Education Owen Odum, Coats 

Chm. on American Bible Society Mrs. W. E. Nichols, Coats 

Chm. on Orphanage Mrs. I. K. Stafford, Buie's Creek 

8. SIMULTANEOUS CAMPAIGN ORGANIZATION 

The Associational Organizer Rev. R. E. Moore, Lillington 

The Associational Chm Rev. G. S. Turner, Chalybeate Springs 

Crusade Director Dr. Herman T. Stevens, Buie's Creek 

Chairman of Finance Mr. J. C. Bullock, Lillington 

Publicity Chairman Rev. G. Van Stephens, Angier 

Radio Chairman Rev. Ernest Russell, Dunn 

Fellowship Chairman Dr. J. W. Angell, Buie's Creek 

Extension Committee Chairman Rev. O. W. Pulley 

Census Chairman R. E. Moore 

Special Rallies Chairman Rev. Sam Hudson, Lillington 

Prayer Chairman Rev. F. C. Maxwell, Erwin 



LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



LIST of MESSENGERS 

ANGIER Mrs. Ila Barbour, Mrs. W. H. Stephenson and 

C. W. Flowers 

ANTIOCH Irvin Stephens, June Byrd, H. G. Patterson, 

Aaron H. Rogers and Lonnie E. Page 

BAPTIST CHAPEL Bobbie Howard, Roland Howard, Deas 

Dickens and Frank Hinnant 

BAPTIST GROVE Henry Howell, J. H. Rogers, Phelma 

Rogers, Joe Revels and C. G. Mills 

BETHEL J. B. Flowers, Mrs. J. B. Flowers, Mrs. Leslie Mat- 
thews, Mrs. Carroll Wood and Delma Lee 

BROADWAY Leslie Pittman, Owen Taylor and Ralph Sikes 

BUIE'S CREEK L. H. Campbell, A. Paul Bagby, B. P. 

Marshbanks, Mrs. T. T. Lanier and Mrs. I. K. Stafford 

CHALYBEATE SPRINGS James Tutor, Robert Wells, 

Richard Connors, Mrs. D. B. Andrews, and Mrs. C. K. Smith 

COATS — Victor Lee, Haywood Roberts, Owen Odum, W. E. 
Nichols and Mrs. T. O. Beasley 

CUMBERLAND UNION — Mrs. C. E. Abernathy, Mrs. Thom- 
as Sears, Mrs. Akrol Arnold and John Sears. 

DUNCAN Exum Tutor, Scott Turner, Jr., Mrs. Atta Tutoe, 

Ila Goodwin and Clevon Betts 

DUNN, FIRST H. Paul Strickland, L. L. Coats, Willard 

Mixon, Dr. C. D. Bain and Miss Lillian Draughon 

DUNN, SECOND M. B. Faircloth, Mrs. Joe Earnhardt, Mrs. 

Matthew Strickland and Mrs. E. B. Jackson 

ERWIN, EAST Mrs. W. M. Baker, Miss Viola Davis, Mrs. 

W. J. Davis, Mrs. Faye Davis and Mrs. Leslie Moore 

ERWIN, FIRST Mrs. N. R. Stephenson, N. R. Stephenson, 

Mrs. Carlton Lucas, Mrs. Will Rochester and Mrs. L. E. 
Stancil 

FRIENDSHIP Archilbald Byrd, Woodrow Newton, C. C. 

Byrd, Mrs. A. L. Jones and Mrs. W. E. Bethune 



LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 9 

HARMONY — H. S. Hedgpeth, George R. Souders, Mrs. John 
Cash, Mrs. A. F. Currin and John Morgan 

HOLLY SPRINGS Otis Patterson, Mrs. B. B. Wilson, Dewey 

Byrd, Peirce Patterson and George Wilson 

KENNEBEC — Norwood Moore, Ernest Haire, Mrs. Bessie 
Howard, Mrs. Macy Howard, Mrs. Oscar McLean and 
Mrs. Lewis Eastwood 

LAYTON'S CHAPEL Mrs. John Fink, C. W. Painter and 

Mrs. L. K. Clark 

LILLINGTON D. B. Dean, W. H. Parrish and J. E. Womble 

MACEDONIA — J. C. Smith, Roy Weathers, J. E. Holt, Mrs. 
J. E. Holt and Mrs. A. C. Hobby 

NEILL'S CREEK Rev. W. T. Campbell, Stedman Ray, Mrs. 

Stedman Ray, Mrs. N. A. Matthews and Carl Pleasant 

OAK GROVE J. B. Dupree, Willie Ammonds, Fulton 

Thomas, Curtis Byrd and Mrs. Reba Gaskin 

PINEY GROVE — I. L. Howell, J. C. Betts, R. E. Austin, T. M. 
Adcock and John Douglas 

PLEASANT MEMORY Mrs. Talmon Penny, W. L. Frank- 
lin, Mrs. Carlie McLamb, Ben Upchurch and Mrs. Ben 
Upchurch 

RAWLS Thomas Moore, Rufus Moore, T. H. Gardner, Mrs. 

O. D. Sherman and Mrs. R. K. Bradley 

SWANN'S STATION E. C. Womack, Mrs. E. C. Womack, 

Mrs. Mary Godfrey, Richard Batchelor and O. R. Link 



10 LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



CONSTITUTION 

1. This association shall be known as "Little River Baptist 
Association." 

2. The object of this association shall be the advancement of 
the Kingdom of Christ, and the means of accomplishing this shall 
be in strict conformity with the principles of the New Testament. 

3. The association shall have no authority over the internal 
right of any church belonging to it and shall act only as an advisory 
council. 

4. The association shall be composed of messengers chosen 
by the churches connected with it, each church being entitled to 
five delegates. Ordained ministers having oversight of churches 
in the association, or having their membership in these churches, 
shall also be received as messengers. 

5. A quorum shall consist of messengers from a majority of 
the churches of the association. 

6. The delegates from each church to the annual meeting of 
the association shall bear a letter certifying their appointment and 
giving an account of the condition of the church and a statement 
of all funds contributed for local and benevolent purposes. 

7. The officers of the association shall be a moderator, a 
vice-moderator, a clerk and a treasurer, who shall be chosen an- 
nually from the members composing the association, and shall 
continue in office until their successors are elected. The term 
of office of the moderator shall begin at the conclusion of the ses- 
sion at which he is elected and continue until the close of the next 
annual meeting. 

8. It shall be the duty of the moderator to preside during 
the deliberations of the body, to enforce the observance of the 
constitution, preserve the decorum, appoint committees except when 
other provisions are made for their appointment, decide all ques- 
tions of order, giving his opinion on any question under discussion, 
and cast the deciding vote in case of a tie. 

9. It shall be the duty of the clerk to record the proceedings 
of each annual meeting of the association, superintend the print- 
ing of the minutes and their distribution among the churches. 

10. It shall be the duty of the treasurer to receive all funds 
sent by the churches or collected during the sessions of this body 
and to disburse the same for the objects stated. He shall present 
a report on all funds administered by him at each annual meeting. 



LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 11 

11. The association shall appoint, annually, a Promotion Com- 
mittee composed of one member from each church in the associa- 
tion and the pastors of the churches. The moderator shall be 
chairman of this committee. The function of this committee shall 
be the promotion of Associational plans through the several 
churches. 

12. The association shall appoint annually an Executive Com- 
mittee of 12 members, among whom by virtue of their office are 
to be the moderator, vice-moderator, clerk- treasurer, S. S. Supt. 
of the Association, Training Union Director, W. M. U. Superin- 
tendent, Supt. of Evangelism, the Associational Missionary. This 
committee shall have general supervision of the affairs of the as- 
sociation during the interval between the meetings of the body; 
shall seek to promote the welfare of the churches, and their active 
participation in the causes fostered by the denomination; but shall 
be answerable to the association for its acts, and make an annual 
report to the association of its work. 

13. The association in annual meeting shall appoint a pres- 
bytery of four members to sit with the pastor of any person whose 
ordination is sought, and the moderator of the association, to 
examine the qualifications and opportunities for work of the can- 
didate. 

14. The association shall hold an annual meeting commenc- 
ing on Tuesday after the fourth Sunday in October. 

15. A meeting of the association may be called by the mod- 
erator at any time by the consent of five members of the Exe- 
cutive committee. Each church shall be notified of such a meet- 
ing in time to send delegates. 

16. This association shall have the right to exclude from its 
membership any church that departs from New Testament prin- 
ciples. 

17. Any church desiring to become a member of this asso- 
jCiation may present a petition at the annual meeting of the body 
through delegates appointed for this purpose. If the association 
shall consent to receive such church the moderator shall extend 
the hand of fellowship to the delegates. 

18. The association may invite visitors to seats and extend 
to them all the privileges of the delegates except that of voting. 

19. By appointment, at each annual meeting, an introductory 
sermon, and a sermon or address on missions shall be delivered. 

20. This constitution may be amended at any annual ses- 
sion, by a vote of two-thirds of the delegates present, provided 
that notice shall be given before the day that such motion will be 
presented. 



12 LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 

PROCEEDINGS 

MORNING SESSION 

1. Moderator L. H. Campbell called the Association to 
order at the Piney Grove Baptist Church at 9:30 A. M., Octo- 
ber 24th, 1950. The meeting began with the singing of "Sweet 
Hour of Prayer." 

2. The devotional was led by Brother J. Ben Eller, pastor 
of the Coats Baptist Church. Brother Eller used portions of 
the scripture from Matthew 18, John 13 and James 4 as his 
text in discussing "The Power of Prayer." 

3. The Clerk called the roll of the churches belonging to 
the association, and all churches were represented. 

4. Brother Sam F. Hudson moved that those present con- 
stitute the Seventy-Fifth Annual Session of the Little River 
Baptist Association, and said motion, being duly seconded, 
was unanimously passed. 

5. Moderator Campbell then welcomed the delegates and 
others present and expressed his delight over the fact that 
the Association was meeting with the Piney Grove Church, 
the same Church with which the Association met in 1932. 
After recognizing the delegates from the Duncan Baptist 
Church, which was admitted to the Association at the Seventy- 
Fourth Annual Session, and welcoming the Duncan Church 
as the Twenty-Eight Church in the Association, the Modera- 
tor called upon Brother Sam F. Hudson to serve as tempor- 
ary chairman. 

6. Upon assuming the Chair, Brother Hudson recognized 
the following visitors: Rev. and Mrs. Grover C. Phillips from 
the Randolph Association; Rev. W. M. Page, Pastor of the 
Fuquay Springs Baptist Church; Brother B. E. Duncan, Associ- 
tional Missionary from the Tar River Association; Brother 
B. G. Womble, Raleigh, N. C, and Brother Stephens from the 
Holly Springs Church in the Raleigh Association; Brother Cad 
Norris, Wake Forest, N. C; Brother M. A. Huggins, secretary 
of the State Baptist Convention, Raleigh, N. C.; and Miss 
Ruth Provence, State W. M. U. Executive Secretary, Raleigh, 
N. C. 

7. The program for the session, with "The Churches Un- 
tapped Resources" as the general theme, was presented and 
upon motion duly made and seconded was adopted by unani- 
mous vote. It should be pointed out that the program received 



LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 13 

much favorable comment from delegates and visitors, both 
with respect to the various subjects to be discussed at the 
session and the individuals which had been obtained to lead 
the discussions. The program as adopted reads as follows: 

PROGRAM 

Seventy-Fifth Annual Session 

LITTLE RIVER ASSOCIATION 

GENERAL THEME: 

The Church's Untapped Resources 

9:30 A. M. Devotional: (Resource No. 1) 

Untapped Resources in Prayer J. Ben Eller, Leader 

9:45 A. M. Roll Call of Churches and Organizations 

10:10 A. M. Moderator's Report 

10:25 A. M. (Resource No. 2) 

The Host of Unsaved in Our Association....G. Scott Turner, 

Leader 

10:55 A. M. (Resource No. 3) 

The Lost World Forrest Maxwell, Leader 

Report On Our Missionary Needs Mrs. D. B. Andrews 

Report On The Need for Sending The Bible Mrs. W. E. 

Nichols 
Address Secertary M. A. Huggins 

11:30 A. M. (Resource No. 4) 

Our Unenlisted Church Members Raymond E. Moore, 

Leader 

11:50 A. M. (Resource No. 5) 

An Inadequate Church Program E. C. Ruffin, Leader 

Report on Care of Our Aged Ministers.. ..Mrs. J. G. Layton 
Report on the Church's Responsibility for Civic 

Righteousness and Social Service A. C. McCall 

Address: A Rural Church Program Henry E. Walden 

12:30 P. M. Annual Sermon J. William Angell 

1:00 P.M. Adjournment for Lunch 

2:00 P. M. (Resource No. 6) 



14 LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATON 

Our Physically Dependent Ernest P. Russell, Leader 

Report on Our Care for the Sick W. D. Moore 

Discussion 

Report on Our Care for the Homeless Child.. ..H. P. Strick- 
land 
Discussion 

2:50 P. M. (Resource No. 7) 

Our Undedicated Wealth James W. Ray 

3:20 P. M. Business 

Report of Special Committee 
Report of Executive Committee 
Miscellaneous Business 
Election of Officers 

4:00 P. M. Adjournment 

7:30 P. M. Music Program by Three Junior Choirs 

8:00 P. M. (Resource No. 8) 

Our Uninformed and Untrained A. Paul Bagby, Leader 

Report on Our B. T. U. Program L. L. Coats 

Report on Our Sunday School Program... Julius Holloway 

Report on Our Reading Program .....Mrs. L. Jackson 

Report on Our Christian College Program J. W. Angell 

Address Claude F. Caddy 

8. Moderator Campbell read his report to the Association. 
The report as adopted reads as follows: 

MODERATOR'S REPORT TO THE 
LITTLE RIVER ASSOCIATION 

We who are here today have the high privilege of observing 
the seventy-fifth anniversary of the organization of the Little 
River Baptist Association, which took place in 1875 at the old 
Cumberland Union Church. The founding of ten of our member 
churches antedates the organization of this body as follows: Neill's 
Creek, the oldest, organized in 1819; Cumberland Union and 
Piney Grove, in 1820; Friendship, in 1832; Antioch, in 1833; Bethel, 
in 1842; Lillington, in 1869; Chalybeate Springs, in 1872; Holly 
Springs and Baptist Grove, in 1874. Buie's Creek church was 
organized in the same year as the Association, in 1875. In our 
observance of this notable anniversary it is peculiarly appropri- 
ate to look backward over our long history of achievement, take 
stock of our present endeavors, and formulate plans for a more 
glorious seventy-five years to come. 



LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 15 



There is much cause for encouragement and Thanksgiving 
in the backward look. Measuring ourselves by ourselves, as well 
as by other religious groups, Baptists have made great progress 
during the past century. According to statistics printed in a recent 
issue of the Alabama Christian Advocate, Southern Baptists 
have increased in numbers in the past 25 years from 31/2 million 
to 6 million members or 67%, a percentage of increase far greater 
than that of any other leading denomination. In gifts we have 
grown from 37 million dollars in 1925 to 156 million dollars in 
1949, or an increase of 319%. In the Little River Association 
we have made great strides in our first % of a century. During 
this period seventeen new churches have grown up within our 
borders, while without exception all the charter members have 
advanced greatly in numbers, plant equipment and leadership. 
Since 1884, the earliest date from which statistics are presently 
available, our membership has grown from 1437 to 8435 in 1949, 
or nearly six fold. Gifts for all causes have increased from $2,083.- 
53 in 1898 to more than $200,000 in 1948 or nearly one hundred 
fold. A non-stop visit some Sunday afternoon on our modern 
highway system by our many new church plants will convince 
anyone of the amazing improvement made in our physical equip- 
ment. Heading up the programs in these churches are to be found 
the best-trained, best-paid corps of pastors ever to lead us. Fin- 
ally, we ought to derive great satisfaction from the fact that the 
people called Baptists, even Southern Baptists, once ridiculed 
for their ignorance and provincialism, have made great progress 
in spiritual vision and in their application of the great scriptural 
doctrine of the brotherhood of man to larger and larger areas of 
human relationships. 

But whereas we view our past with genuine pride, there is 
much to make us dissatisfied with our present state of affairs. 
Measuring ourselves by ourselves, as we have done, we discover 
great advances in almost every particular. Measuring our spiritual 
advance by the phenominal rate of development in secular pur- 
suits all around us, the progress of our churches proves to be more 
apparent than real. For instance, while most of our churches show 
a gratifying gain in membership, because of the large net gain in 
population, we probably have more unsaved people among us 
to-day than seventy-five years ago. In spite of extensive church 
building programs everywhere, improvement in our facilities for 
worship and training generally fall far behind the measure of 
progress made in our modern public school plants, in our com- 
munication and transportation systems and in our centers of com- 
mercial entertainment. Even with the higher standard of pre- 
paration among our Baptist pastors, the level of training of many 
of them still is well below that required of our teachers in the 



16 LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



elementary school. Measured in terms of progress in society all 
about us, I wonder whether during the past seventy-five years 
the Church of Christ has gained or lost in her purpose to make 
the Kingdoms of this world the Kingdoms of our Lord and Christ; 
whether light or darkness is settling over the face of the earth. 

On this seventy-fifth anniversary occasion our world is in 
a state of confusion and fear. The great military powers of the 
world have been reduced to just two, each dominated by antithe- 
tical idealogies. In the very real sense, the great Christian foun- 
dations of human freedoms, universal brotherhood, and peace 
are challenged by the Pagan war-god of the totalitarian state 
that denies the sacredness of personality and subordinates the 
individual created in God's image to the welfare of a soulless 
state. That America very imperfectly upholds in her national 
life the holy Christian ideals challenged in this Armageddon, is 
due to the failure of our Christian forces to possess a controlling 
influence in our national policy. If the church's work of leaven- 
ing the thought-life of our membership, and through them their 
neighbors, were well done, the power of united people crusading 
for a righteous cause would be invincible. The hour is late, but 
pray to God it be not too late. 

Our peril lies in the fact that as Christians we are following 
a business-as-usual policy in a time of great emergency. The 
work of our churches is handicapped because a vast majority of 
our membership is for practical purposes unenlisted. If the other 
two -thirds of our membership should decide to attend church 
next Sunday, our enlarged plants would be overtaxed. If the great 
majority who make no substantial contribution should decide to 
support our financial program worthily, the attention of our fin- 
ance committees would change from the problem of financing 
our puny programs to that of discovering the most fertile fields 
for new investments. 

No small part of this responsibility must fall upon a small 
group of leaders in our several churches who are in many in- 
stances "asleep at the switch." They are content to carry on busi- 
ness as usual, with little vision of what might be accomplished, 
unwilling to experiment, particularly if any increased expenditure 
is involved. Many of our churches suffer the additional handicap 
of having as their only paid leader an absentee pastor who is 
out of touch with work for most of the time. 

Lack of time prevents a comprehensive treatment of the pro- 
blem but because of the seriousness of the problem, brief men- 
tion should be made to the schisms among Christian groups that 
destroy unity action and teamwork. As a result, our ranks are 



LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 17 



divided into rival camps that rally around divisive loyalties based 
largely upon secondary issues. Baptists are split into Northern 
and Southern wings, which are suspicious of each other; into so- 
called modernists and fundamentalists, between whom too little 
Christian fellowship exists. Southern Baptists shy away from 
affiliation with voluntary inter -denominational organizations 
established to make for closer fellowship and unity of effort. 
In a time when our physical safety depends upon world-wide 
union between nations differing in race, culture, and political 
theory. Christian groups that preach the Fatherhood of God and 
the brotherhood of man should lead the way toward the realiza- 
tion of one world. 

Throughout this program today, we shall focus attention 
upon untapped resources at our disposal, which if utilized would 
go far toward transforming many well-nigh powerless church 
organizations into dynamic institutions. What church has made 
full use of any of these available resources? In such a time as 
this, every church should be fully mobilized for a world-wide 
Crusade in support of our Christ and our Christian way of life. 
Come, therefore, let us reason together concerning matters of 
supreme importance. 

Respectfully submitted, 

L. H. Campbell, Moderator 

9. Following the reading of his report, Moderator Camp- 
bell appointed the following committees: 

Committee on Time, Place and Preacher: 

C. E. Ruffin, Chairman, Mrs. Anna Bland and Leo 
Betts. 

Committee on Organization: 

R. E. Moore, Chairman, B. O. Slaughter, Julius Hollo- 
way, Mrs. D. B. Andrews and G. Scott Turner, Sr. 

Committee on Resolutions: 

Mrs. Exie Smith, Chairman, J. E. Womble and Mrs. 
F. D. Byrd. 

11. Brother G. Scott Turner, Sr. delivered an address on 
"The Host of Unsaved in Our Association" with particular 
emphasis on the importance of enlisting the unsaved in our 
Churches and Sunday Schools. 

12. Brother Forrest Maxwell lead a panel discussion on 
"The Lost World." After preliminary remarks by Mr. Max- 
well Mrs. W. E. Nichols commented on the need for sending 
the Bible and in connection therewith gave her report on 
the American Bible Society, which report reads as follows: 



18 LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 

REPORT ON AMERICAN BIBLE SOCIETY 

Surely the Christian's weapon in this day and hour is the 
Bible. It is the Book of today for our world of tomorrow. Chris- 
tians have accepted it as their textbook for study because they 
are convinced that in it, God speaks to man. If the people of 
the world are to know Christ, they must have the Bible, and must 
have it in his own tongue if the word of God is to speak to his 
heart. 

The ending of World War II opened lands which for years 
had been denied the Bible. Word has come fromx the Korean 
Bible Society Secretary that his family survived the three months 
of enemy occupation and the final days of fighting in Seoul. 
The Bible house and its contents are gone. Only parts of the 
wall remain. There is immediate need for replacing the lost stock 
of Korean scriptures. The Japanese people have turned to the 
Bible with an interest unknown to all history. General McArthur 
sent in October for immediate delivery of 10,000,000 Bibles. From 
many different sources of our world today comes the crying 
need of our Bible. In most countries of the world today the in- 
come of the people is so low that they cannot afford even the 
bare cost of the printed scriptures. Someone must help those 
who cannot help themselves. 

With this situation before us we, as Little River Baptists, 
recognize the American Bible Society as an essential part of the 
world-wide mission program. The Society seeks to fill emergency 
requests from the war torn nations for scripture in Chinese, 
Russian, Korean, Greek, Hungarian, Serbian, Rumanian and 
many other languages. 

Any delay in meeting this need is tragic. Surelj^ our pastors 
in our Association are fully aware of this need and will encour- 
age a fine and worthy contribution from the churches. Contri- 
butions should be sent to Mr. M. A. Huggins marked: For the 
American Bible Society. Suggestions for the country and village 
churches is $10.00 to $25.00. Churches in small cities, $25.00 to 
$100.00. Larger churches, $100.00 to $200.00. 

We believe as Christians, I'm sure, that the Bible is needed 
as the greatest guide to find the true and essential road to Peace. 
Let's encourage our world wide Bible reading program from 
Thanksgiving until Christmas and join with the Psalmist in say- 
ing "Thy word have I hid in mine heart that I might not sin 
against thee." 

The great Sir Walter Scott wrote: 

Within this awful volume lies 
Lies the mystery of mysteries: 
Happiest they of human race, 



LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 19 

To whom their God has given Grace 

To read, to fear, to hope, to pray. 

To lift the latch, to force the way; 

But better had they ne'er been born. 

Who read to doubt, or read to scorn. 
Respectfully submitted, 
(Mrs. W. E.) Eva M. Nichols 

Mrs. D. B. Andrews then presented Miss Ruth Provence, 
State W. M. U. Executive Secretary, who gave a very fine re- 
port on our missionary needs. Following the remarks by Miss 
Provence, Brother M. A. Huggins, Secretary of our State Bap- 
tist Convention, delivered an inspiring address. 

13. It appearing that there would not be adequate time to 
complete the program outlined for the morning session be- 
fore the hour for adjournment, upon motion duly made and 
seconded the discussion by Brother Raymond Moore on "Our 
Unenlisted Church Members" and the panel discussion on 
"An Inadequate Church Program" were postponed until the 
afternoon session. However, Brother Henry Walden of the 
Wake Forest College Faculty, who was to appear as a member 
of the panel on "An Inadequate Church Program" delivered 
his address in order that he might return to Wake Forest in 
time to meet previously made commitments. Brother Walden 
gave a most enlightening address, using as his topic "A Rural 
Church Program." 

14. Brother J. W. Angelh pastor of the Buie's Creek Church, 
was recognized to preach the annual sermon. Brother Angell 
used portions of the scriptuie from Exodus 3 as his text. 

15. Brother Angell delivered the benediction, whereupon 
we adjourned for the lunch hour and enjoyed a most excellent 
and bountiful meal on the grounds of the host church. 

AFTERNOON SESSION 

16. At 2:00 P. M., after the singing of appropriate hymns, 
the Moderator called the afternoon session to order. 

17. The Committee on Time, Place and Preacher was recog- 
nized for its report. The report as presented and adopted reads 
as follows: 

Preacher Rev. Ernest P. Russell, Pastor 

of Dunn First Church. 

Alternate Rev. G. Van Stephens, Pastor 

of Angier Church. 



20 LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 

Place Buie's Creek Church 

Time As Prescribed by the Constitution 

18. Brother C. E. Ru££in lead a panel discussion on "An 
Inadequate Church Program." After appropriate opening re- 
marks by Brother Ruffin, Brother Ernest Russell, acting on 
behalf of Mrs. Maude C. Layton who was unable to be pre- 
sent, gave the report of the Relief and Annuity Board. The 
report as adopted reads as follows: 

REPORT OF THE RELIEF AND ANNUITY BOARD 

The Relief Department again spent more than it received 
last year for the aged ministers and widows of ministers, in an 
effort to prevent suffering and want. 

Many of our pastors are retiring without retirement benefits 
and are throwing a burden upon the Relief Department beyond 
its resources. 

Every church is urged to take a fellowship offering for min- 
isterial relief, preferably at the observance of the Lord's Supper. 

The Social Security Bill, passed by the United States Senate 
on June 20, 1950, EXCLUDED ALL EMPLOYEES OF CHURCHES 
AND CHURCH RELATED GROUPS from the Social Security 
Program. The Southern Baptist Convention, meeting in Chicago, 
passed a strong resolution requesting that religious groups be ex- 
cluded because BAPTISTS BELIEVE IN COMPLETE SEPARA- 
TION OF CHURCH AND STATE. 

So it is IMPERATIVE that all church employees be enrolled 
in one of the annuity plans of the Board, that they may be as- 
sured an income in their old age. 

For Ministers Retirement Plan, dues are payable monthly 
or quarterly, in the middle of the period, and are as follows: 

1. The pastor pays 4% of his salary. 

2. The Church, or churches, he serves pays an amount equal 
to that paid by the pastor. 

3. The Convention adds to that amount. 

Funds are handled by our Relief and Annuity Board and 
nobody makes a cent of profit out of it; and all amounts earn in- 
terest. 

A minister who enters the plan cannot lose. If at any time 
he wishes to withdraw his membership he can surrender his certi- 
ficate and receive every cent he himself has put into the Plan, 
plus interest. 

There are 1800 pastors in North Carolina and many lay work- 
ers. Since 1940, when the Annuity Plan was adopted by N. C. 
Baptists, only 943 certificates of membership in the Ministers Re- 
tirement Plan have been issued. Many of these have left the State, 



LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 21 

retired or died. At present the active membership numbers 581; 
71 retired ministers and 19 widows now draw a check each month. 
Too few of our ministers have taken advantage of the protection 
offered by the Ministers Retirement Fund! 

The majority of the members in the Plan pay on the maxi- 
mum salary ($4,000.00 per year), and would be in position to ac- 
cumulate something for their old age. The ones on the smaller 
salaries, for some reason, have not joined and THEY ARE THE 
ONES THAT WILL NEED HELP AT THE TIME OF RETIRE- 
MENT. 

Some say the Church will not join with them. 

The Church does not pay into this fund for just one pastor, 
but to help all pastors and church employees. It is so designed 
that each church a pastor serves during his participation in the 
Plan has a share in providing something for his old age. It would 
seem good for all the churches he serves during his ministry, 
whether they are five or twenty-five, to have some share in pro- 
viding an annuity for him. In this way the burden of caring for 
a minister does not fall on the last church served. Surely this 
is right. 

In Little River Association the following Churches support 
the Ministers Retirement Plan: Angier. Antioch, Buie's Creek. 
Coats. Dunn (First), Erwin (First), Friendship, Lillington. 

Deacons or church committees should make a special effort to 
enroll their pastors in the Ministers Retirement Plan. Even a small 
amount of income, when a person gets old, will certainly come in 
good! 

Write Dr. M. A. Huggins, Baptist Headquarters, Raleigh, for 
information and enrollment blanks. 

Respectfully submitted, 

(Mrs. J. G.) Maude C. Layton 

Brother A. C. McCall then presented the Social Service 
Report. This report as presented reads as follows: 

SOCIAL SERVICE REPORT 

Sometime ago I read about a conversation between a math 
teacher and his pupil. I recall this about the matter; the class 
was engaged in finding the process mathematically in extracting 
the squareroot of the problem and for some reason the pupil said 
to the teacher, "Will the solving of this problem, finding the way 
to get the squareroot of it. make our world any better place in 
which to live?" The teacher possibly caught off guard replied, 
"I guess not." Then the pupil asked, "Why are we trying to do it?" 

To me Jesus certainly taught and expected that His Church 
would be engaged by teaching, preaching and acting, in the things 
that would make our world a better place in which to live. There 



22 LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 

is the parable of the Mustard Seed and the parable of the Leaven, 
and other parables might be cited. Then there is the prayer that He 
taught His desciples to pray: "Thy Kingdom Come Thy Will Be 
Done On Earth As It Is In Heaven." Then in that greatest of all 
recorded prayers, John 17, He prayed that all His followers might 
be one. 

Certainly pragmatism has its weak places, but if the teachings 
of Jesus, and the prayers of Jesus, after nineteen and a half 
centuries, face the kind of world that now exists, it might be 
the part of wisdom for the Church to ask the same question that 
the math student asked. 

THE CHURCHES RESPONSIBILITY TOWARDS 
RACE RELATIONS 

Certainly the recent primary election in our State demon- 
strated beyond a reasonable doubt, the need of something being 
done about the race question. 

We must admit that much of the problem of race relations 
is caused by the unwillingness of white people to admit certain 
basic rights which are guaranteed to any citizen, white or colored, 
by the constitution of the United States. The labor question also 
has much to do with this race problem. The negroes work for the 
white man, plow the fields, prime the tobacco, pick the cotton, 
live in shacks and many of our more economically secure people 
believe Plato's philosophy, namely: "That the good things of life 
are for a few, and it is up to that few, to use other people to help 
them get the good things." That these and many other attitudes 
and treatments are unchristian ought to be understood and ac- 
cepted by our Churches today. 

Christians will protest injustices and discriminations against 
any group. Prejudiced will towards any group is unchristian. All 
citizens have the right to equal privileges and treatment in our 
local. State and Federal Governments. 

The New Testament never holds up a high standard of morals, 
ethics, and religion apart from the Christian spirit of grace. It 
is the deep conviction of your Committee, that around this cen- 
tral teaching of the New Testament, we find something that is 
everlastingly true. That with the same exactness found in Euclid's 
position — A Straight Line Is The Shortest Distance Between Two 
Points; or chemistry — That water is composed of H20, when 
through faith in Jesus Christ, God's Grace comes into our hearts, 
prejudice, racial, religious, and political goes out. Whether our 
churches can help this racial question or not depends on how much 
of Christ is in our churches. 



LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 23 



THE CHURCH'S DUTY TOWARD PUBLIC HEALTH 

First, every seriously minded person must have been greatly 
disturbed in the past weeks and months as they have noticed 
the reports from draft boards indicating the great number of 
those examined that failed to pass the physical and mental exami- 
nation. There are ten thousand patients in our mental hospitals in 
Raleigh, Morganton, Goldsboro and Butner-Caswell. As the aged 
have become more numerous, and living space has dwindled, many 
elderly people have found themselves the displaced persons of 
the family. It is both logical and reasonable to think that many of 
these people are suffering more from the social disease of rejection 
by their families than from mental weaknesses. 

It is true that medical science has made great progress to- 
wards mastering many of the diseases caused by germs. The great 
destruction once wrought by these diseases very probably will not 
occur again, but while this is true, for which all of us are grate- 
ful, sanatoriums have increased at a rapid rate because of the 
increase in patients who suffer from that which the psychologist 
call disintegrated persons, split personalities, diseases caused be- 
cause of prejudices, ill will, and selfishness. 

It is true that our Federal Government is informed and alarm- 
ed about these things and has and is appropriating great sums 
for the purpose of hospitals. Our State and Counties are also spend 
ing great sums for the treatment of those who are sick. 

Religious denominations are working at this thing also. I 
personally think that it is the duty of the Church to minister to 
these conditions in every way possible. Help to get spiritual 
leadership for all the institutions where the sick and suffering 
are; build and equip hospitals on the highest and best scientific 
basis we know. 

I think that it is the Church's duty to go back of the treat- 
ment to find and eliminate the cause. The things mentioned above 
are the results of something; it is the Church's duty to find that 
cause. Teach the facts, preach against the evils. Jesus said if 
the house was builded on a rock it would not fall, but remember. 
He put back of the building of such a house intelligence — I will 
liken him unto a wise man, — the word translated wise is the 
Greek word for intelligence. 

THE CHURCH'S DUTY TOWARD THE EVILS OF ALCOHOL 

First, I gathered from a report in the News and Observer that 
the ABC Stores of North Carolina did one of the biggest businesses 
ever in the month of September. There was an increase of sales 
in all the districts where these stores are located. I am told that 
there are more young women working in places where some form 



24 LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 

of alcoholic beverage is sold in our country than there are in 
our colleges and universities. 

It is reported that a man travelling through fifty cities of 
our nation observed that in every one of them some kind of al- 
coholics could be bought on Sunday in many different places — 
hotels, eating places, beer gardens, wine sellers, etc. This same 
man visited one or more churches in each city to observe that 
only one preacher said one word against this evil from the 
pulpit. 

At the time our Association met a year ago, we were working 
planning, praying that we might be successful in getting enough 
votes in our county to keep ABC stores out. We succeeded in that 
particular effort, but since then our largest town has voted the 
sale of beer and is now or will soon be selling the same. 

There are in almost every community places where alcohol 
in some form is sold. Some of these places are near enough to 
the church, so those engaged in this business can hear the church 
bell ring. Alcohol is the fourth ranking health problem in our 
land. There are one million known alcoholics in our land. One 
person says that at least twenty-five percent of all patients ad- 
mitted to state hospitals suffer from chronic alcoholic conditions. 

THE CHURCH'S RESPONSIBILITY FOR THE HOME 

The home has always been the basis of society. As the home 
goes so goes the nation. There is much in modern life that is des- 
tructive of the home. Certain programs and advertisements over 
the radio, the prevelance of world amusements, the undermining 
of the meaning of marriage, the ridicule of things spiritual by 
people of influence; the cocktail party and glass, vulgarity, drunk- 
enness, profanity, the commercialized sabbath — children cannot 
escape the influence of these things. 

As a result of the breakdown in our homes, two disturbing 
expressions come out as a result — a greatly increased divorce 
rate, and the problem of juvenile delinquency. The Church does 
have a responsibility concerning these two things. A teacher said 
in my presence some weeks ago that she had checked over a 
period of time with the persons connected with the courts and 
other agencies that have dealt with the juvenile group and that 
she finds that two-thirds of them could not repeat the Lord's 
prayer and that not one of a certain large group could give the 
basis of the ten commandments. In the Adult Training Union 
quarterly program for Sunday night, October 1st, when the sub- 
ject for discussion was "Bringing People Into Right Relationship 
To God", the 5th point was "What Our Churches Can Do." 

First, our Churches must be changed before they can do the 
thing that needs to be done. Churches have been increasing in 



LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 25 

number, in gifts, and in many other ways while our world has 
been becoming what it is. 

Is is not illogical to despair of our homes and our youth while 
one half of our churches are dark on Sunday nights and the one 
half that are open are half empty and the places of amusements 
are filled with many of the church members. 

Respectfully submitted, 

A. C. McCall 

Following the reading of this report it was amended to 
provide for a standing committee on social service, and upon 
motion duly made and seconded was adopted as amended by 
unanimous vote. 

19. Moderator Campbell recognized Dr. L. L. Carpenter, 
Editor of the Biblical Recorder. Dr. Carpenter spoke briefly 
but inspiringly on the Recorder and other Christian literature, 
and urged every church to place the Recorder in every church 
family. 

20. Brother Raymond Moore delivered a report on "Our 
Unenlisted Church Members." Brother Moore laid particular 
emphasis on the need for enlisting church members in the 
work of Christ. 

Following this report. Brother G. Scott Turner, Sr., moved 
that the session give Brother Moore a rising vote of thanks for 
his work in the Association as Associational Missionary. This 
motion was duly seconded and unanimously passed by the dele- 
gates rising in a body. 

22. Brother Ernest Russell lead a panel discussion on "Our 
Physically Dependent." Dr. W. D. Moore, who was to dis- 
cuss our care for the sick and give the report on the Baptist 
Hospital was unable to be present. 

Brother Russell then recognized Dr. W. K. McGee, Direc- 
tor of the Department of Religion at Bowman Gray School of 
Medicine, who gave an informative and uplifting address on 
the work of our hospital and its ever increasing need for sup- 
port from our churches. 

H. Paul Strickland commented on our care for the home- 
less child and delivered the report on Baptist Orphanage. His 
report as presented and adopted reads as follows: 

REPORT ON BAPTIST ORPHANAGE 

The Baptist of North Carolina can justly be proud of the 
work which they have done through their orphanage, which con- 
sists of two units. The Mills Home at Thomasville, N. C. and the 



26 LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 

Kennedy Home at Kinston, N. C. These institutions have, through 
the years, provided a Christian home for countless hundreds of 
boys and girls who, through no fault of their own, have had to 
depend upon the Baptist of North Carolina to provide for them 
a home. 

During the past year, the Baptist Orphanage has provided a 
home for 781 children which have come from every section of 
our State. The health of these children has been excellent and 
they have done well in school. There were fourteen graduating 
from Mills Home and five from Kennedy Home. There have been 
70 baptized at Mills Home and a large number at Kennedy Home. 
The excellent care which these children have received is due to 
the fine work which has been done under the supervision of Dr. 
Zeno Wall, General Superintendent at the Mills Home, and Mr. 
W. C. Reed at Kennedy Home, assisted by their co-workers, many 
of whom have given many years of service to this noble cause. 

The Baptists of North Carolina during the past year contri- 
buted more to the support of their orphanage than they had ever 
contributed in any one year, and by so doing, many long needed 
improvements were made v/hich will enable it to render a greater 
service to the boys and girls who make their home there. In March 
of this year, the Co-Executors of the Robert M. Idol Estate turn- 
ed over to the orphanage $586,000.00 to be used in building a 
church at Mills Home, in memory of his mother, an infirmary at 
Mills Home, in memory of his sister, and a vocational building, 
which the trustees have suggested should be in memory of Mr. 
Idol himself. This is the largest single bequest the orphanage has 
ever received and will help provide for a great need at Mills Home. 

Dr. Zeno Wall, who has been General Superintendent at Mills 
Home, retired during the summer at the age of 68, and is now 
making his home in Shelby. Mr. W. C. Reed, who has been at 
Kennedy Home, has been selected to take Dr. Walls place at Mills 
Home, and Mr. and Mrs. W. A. Smith of Boone, are to take over 
the work at Kennedy Home. He will be Superintendent and his 
wife will assist him. 

The orphanage is supported by monthly offerings in the vari- 
ous churches, and a special offering at Thanksgiving, together 
with any private donations which may be made by friends. There 
are many churches in our Association, which for years have con- 
tributed to this most worthy project, but some of our churches in 
this Association should make a greater effort to more effectively 
support the work of the orphanage. 

Respectfully submitted, 

H. Paul Strickland 



LIl TLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 27 



Ht' Following Brother Strickland's report Brother Russell 
presented Mr. W. C. Reed, Superintendent of the Baptist Orp- 
hanage at Thomasville. Brother Reed delivered a stirring mes- 
sage on the work we are doing in our orphanages. 

23. Mr. James W. Ray, State Baptist Student Secretary, 
delivered a very informative address on "Our Undedicated 
Wealth" with particular emphasis on the agricultural assets 
within the geographical confines of our Association, and urged 
that these great assets be employed in expanding the Kingdom 
of God. 

24. Brother Forrest Maxwell suggested that the minutes of 
this session be dedicated to the late Dr. P. G. Parker, and upon 
motion duly made and seconded it was so ordered. 

25. Upon motion of Brother G. Scott Turner, Sr., second- 
d by Brother Ernest Russell, the Executive Committee was 

appointed as the Budget Committee to recommend a budget 
for the Associational Missionary program for the coming year. 

26. Brother G. Scott Turner, Sr., introduced a resolution 
reciting the value of Campbell College to this area and the 
State and calling upon all individuals and churches in our 
Association to give wholehearted support to the recently in- 
stituted enlargement program for the College. The Moderator 
relinquished the Chair to Brother Sam Hudson and upon mo- 
tion dulv made and seconded, the resolution was adopted by 
unanimous vote. Brother Hudson then returned the Chair to 
the Moderator. 

27. The Moderator recognized Brother Raymond Moore, 
Chairman of the Committee on Organization, for the report 
of that committee. The report of the committee was unani 
mously adopted and the names of the elected officers appear 
in the front of these minutes. 

28. Mrs. Exie Smith, Chairman of the Committee on Reso- 
lutions was recognized and gave the report of her committee. 
The report as adopted reads as follows: 

; REPORT OF THE RESOLUTION COMMITTEE 

The Little River Association in its 75th annual session feels 
a deep gratitude to the Heavenly Father for the privilege of serv- 
ing the lost world, and coming to Piney Grove Baptist Church 
for its high hour of inspiration on the theme, "The Church's Un- 
tapped Resources." 

We give thanks for the large attendance and the fact that 
every church in the Association sent messengers. ' 



28 LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



We appreciate the bountiful dinner and cordial hospitality 
of the entertaining churches composed of Rawls, Baptist Grove, 
Macedonia and the Host Church, and the loyalty of the Associa- 
tion officers. 

We thank our Moderator, our Missionary, and all those who 
assisted in this fine program. 

We are greatly indebted to our Moderator for his report on 
the history of the association during its 75 years. 

We respectfully commend Mr. Scott Turner for his appeal 
for the Evangelistic Crusade for 1951, and we pledge full support 
in this great effort. 

We appreciate the presence of Secretary Huggins, Rev. Henry 
Walden and Miss Ruth Provence and the high inspirations of 
their messages. We want to thank Mr. Reed of Thomasville Or- 
phanage and Dr. McGee from Baptist Hospital for their appeal- 
ing messages. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Mrs. Exie Smith, Coats, Chairman 

Mrs. F. D. Byrd, Bunnlevel 

Mr. J. E. Womble, Lillington 

29. No report was presented from the Executive Committee 
or the Special Committee. 

30. Brother J. C. Bullock, Treasurer, was unable to be 
present and give his report. However, copies of his report 
were distributed to tlie delegates. His report is as follows: 

TREASURER'S REPORT 

Report of J. C. Bullock, treas., of Little River Associational 
Mission and Minute Funds. 

(December 1, 1949 through September 30, 1950) 

Balance in Bank of Lillington, Dec. 1, 1949 $ 678.37 
Received of: 

Angier 158.56 

Antioch 250.00 

Baptist Grove 18.97 

Buies Creek 100.00 

Chalybeate Springs 100.00 

Coats 11.00 

Cumberland Union 57.75 

Dunn, First 550.00 

Erwin, First 180.00 

Friendship 100.00 

Holly Springs 25.00 

Layton's Chapel 75.00 



LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 29 

Lillington 225.00 

Neill's Creek 13.20 

Swann's Station 10.00 

Baptist State Convention 800.00 



$3,352.85 

Paid out: 

R. E. Moore, Salary, 1-14-50 to 9-18-50 $1,701.00 

R. E. Moore, Expense fund. 2-1-50 to 9-29-50 1,125.00 

M. A. Huggins, Retirement fund, 1-14-50 to 9-18-50 .... 171.00 

Pope Printing Co., minutes, 3-3-50 185.00 

Byrd Butane Co., gas meter, 2-20-50 15.00 

Gray and Creech, supplies, 4-15-50 to 6-15-50 14.60 

Harnett Co. News, Printing, 6-12-50 13.50 

Baptist Book Store, Record Book, 8-16-50 75 

Totals $3,225.85 
Balance in bank, 9-30-50 127.00 



$3,352.85 
(Received since October 1, 1950) 

Balance in bank, 10-1-50 $ 127.00 

Received of: 

Angier 27.32 

Antioch 10.00 

Baptist Chapel 10.00 

Buies Creek 100.00 

Baptist Grove 12.00 

Broadway 10.00 

Bethel Baptist 25.00 

Coats 94.00 

Dunn, First 15.00 

Dunn. 2nd 30.50 

Erwin East 10.00 

Friendship 10.00 

Harmony 10.00 

Layton Chapel 75.00 

Lillington 10.00 

Holly Springs 25.00 

Macedonia 47.00 

Neill's Creek 15.00 

Oak Grove 25.91 

Piney Grove 25.00 



30 LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



Pleasant Memory ..............;. 7.00 

Rawls 30.00 

Swann's Station 25.00 

State Convention 100.00 

$ 875.73 
Paid out (since October 1, 1950) 

10-13-50, R. E. Moore, Salary $ 189.00 

10-13-50, Retirement. M. A. Huggins 19.00 

10-13-50, Supplies, Gray and Creech 12.13 



$ 220.13 
Balance in bank, 10-23-50 655.60 



$ 875.73 



31. Following the benediction the afternoon session ad- 
journed to enjoy an excellent meal on the grounds of the host 
church. 

EVENING SESSION 

32. The Evening Session opened with a period of hymn 
singing led by Brother Benny Slaughter, after which the mem- 
bers of the session quoted many verses of scripture from mem- 
ory. 

33. The Moderator called the session to order at 7:30 p. m. 
He recognized the members of the Piney Grove Church and 
thanked them on behalf of the Association for the splendid 
manner in which they had fulfilled the duties of the host church. 

34. The Friendship Choir sang, "Is Your All on the Altar" 
and "What Will You Do With Jesus," and the Junior Choir 
of the Dunn First Church, led by David Smith of Campbell 
College, sang "God The Almighty One." 

35. The Budget Committee, consisting of members of the 
Executive Committee, presented its recommendation and upon 
motion duly made and seconded the recommendation of the 
committee was adopted. The budget as adopted is as follows: 

Salary ....|2,700.00 

Travel 900.00 

Housing 600.00 

Retirement -— 96.00 

Printing and Supplies 50.00 

Associational Officers 150.00 

$4,496.00 



LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 31 

Upon the adoption of the budget, Brother Hudson com- 
mented briefly on the plan for providing the funds to meet 
the budget. He pointed out that under this plan each church 
was to give 3% of the amount of its budget, exclusive of build- 
ing funds. 

36. The Moderator recognized Dr. A. Paul Bagby who de- 
livered an inspiring address on "Our Uninformed and Un- 
trained." 

In the absence of Brother L. L. Coats, Brother Benny 
Slaughter read the report on our B. T. U. Program. The re- 
port as adopted reads as follows: 

THE TRAINING UNION REPORT 

During the past year our association has had two Training 
Union mass meetings. On Mobilization Day last December, 10 
churches were represented by 123 persons. Of these, 5 were pas- 
tors and 5 were Training Union Directors. At the spring mass 
meeting there were, as usual, entries in all the contests. Most of 
the participants in the memory work and hymn festival went on 
to one of the state assemblies, Fruitland or Caswell, and were de- 
clared winners there. 

Some new unions have been organized, and perhaps others 
have died. Only a very few churches have sent in every quarter 
their reports for the general and individual unions. Therefore you 
must wait to see the table compiled from the church letters to 
know the statistical facts. 

Your director has presided over three executive meetings, 
made as many contacts and visits as possible. Special mention 
should be made of the efforts of the chorister to stimulate interest 
in the hymn festival. The department leaders have promoted their 
contests, too, by visits or letters. 

Since no fund was provided for expenses, we have been de- 
pendent on our own personal resources and on the generosity of 
the Dunn First Baptist Church for the use of their facilities and 
for stamps, stationery, etc. A fund is urgently needed for the 
Training Union to do much in promoting the work throughout the 
association. 

For this coming year, a strategic one because of the simul- 
taneous revivals in the spring, we make the following recommen- 
dations: 

1. That much prayer and thought be given to the second part 
of the great commission of Jesus. "Teach them to observe all 
things which I have commanded you." 

2. That each church and each pastor make greater effort to 
maintain a growing Training Union with a place for every church 



32 LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



member; and that the status of the union and its parts be report- 
ed each quarter. 

3. That each Training Union provide, after every revival, a 
"New Members Class" for the new converts, using such a book as 
"My Life and My Church," and that the new members be then 
enlisted in the proper unions. 

4. That every church begin now to prepare participants 
for the various contests and tournaments next spring. 

5. That a minimum of $25.00 be provided for the expenses 
of the Associational Training Union. 

The 1951 aim of the Training Union is "to help every Chris- 
tian make all of life's choices in the light of God's will." Joshua 
said, "Choose you this day whom you will serve; as for me and 
my house, we will serve the Lord." (Joshua 24:15). 

The Training Union will light the dark windows of our city 
and country church houses to beckon toward God our young 
people, and their elders, from the brilliant lights everywhere 
calling them to lesser, even evil places. Never in the world has the 
World so needed men and women with knowledge and sta- 
mina to stand up for their faith. The Training Union is the church's 
agency for developing just such people. So develop your people 
through the Training Union. 

Respectfully submitted, 
L. L. Coats, Director 

Brother Julius Holloway rendered the report on our Sun- 
day School Program and his report, as adopted, reads as fol- 
lows: 

THE SUNDAY SCHOOL REPORT 

The Associational Sunday School organization has held gen- 
eral conferences and officers meetings during the year. We offer- 
ed a team of workers to each Sunday school to help present the 
Southern Baptist Sunday School Program for the year. An Asso- 
ciational Vacation Bible School clinic was held at Lillington to 
help our Bible school workers with their schools. 

The emphasis in the Sunday School work this year has been 
on: Bringing the whole family to Sunday School, a full time 
worship program where the pastor can not be there every Sunday, 
better Bible-teaching, better training for preparation of our work- 
ers. In the association 7 new departments were added. There were 
only 360 people added to our enrollment this year. The average 
attendance this year was 3558 compared with 3416 last year. Bible 
school enrollment this year 2469, last year 2425.Average atten- 
dance this year 2098 — last year 1958. 

An associational planning meeting was held at Lillington 
with Mrs. C. D. Bain as our visiting worker. We are offering 



LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 33 



again this year a team of workers to present the Sunday School 
program. A good number of churches have already had these 
workers and are off to a good start on the new years work. We 
hope that each church will invite the team and present the work 
by November. 

Again this year the theme is, "Take your family to Sunday 
School." Our aims are: "More people", "More Bible Study", 
"More trained workers", "More Soul-Winners." 

Let's do all the good we can to all the people we can this year. 
Respectfully submitted, 

Julius Holloway, Assn'l Supt. 

Brother J. W. Angell made the report of the Committee 
on Christian Education. His report as adopted reads as follows: 

REPORT OF COMMITTEE ON 
CHRISTIAN EDUCATION 

A crisis is rapidly developing with regard to our denomina- 
tional program of Christian Education, and unless we begin im- 
mediately to take steps to cope with it our schools and colleges 
will face failure and possible extinction in the not too distant 
future. That crisis presents itself now in at least three aspects. 

The first threat which confronts Christian Education is that 
posed by competition with the State. For more than a generation, 
government has been gradually taking over the whole field of 
education, and by the power of its tax funds the State has almost 
driven the churches out of contention on the high school level. 
Does the same fate await our colleges and universities? It must 
be obvious that our denominational funds for Christian Education 
do not even compare with the tremendous financial outlay of the 
State for its colleges and universities, and therefore that such 
an unbalance will continue to make competition more difficult 
for our schools. 

The second aspect of the crisis is closely related to the first. 
It is the increasingly widespread acceptance of the philosophy of 
secularism in education. To state it succinctly, our generation 
believes that education and religion are entirely separate matters 
and should be kept that way, from kindergarten to graduate school. 
As Dr. Bernard Iddings Bell pointed out in a recent article, 
American education has come to treat religion as a dispensable 
diversion, and therefore we are about to become a nation of 
religious illiterates. And this condition is a necessary outgrowth 
of the mistaken noton that, since education is to be left to the 
government, the principle of separation of Church and State dic- 
tates that no religion can be taught. 

The third threat to our program of Christian Education is 
from within the denomination itself, with all its agencies and 



34 LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



activities. As the family increases in size, the pie must be cut 
into smaller pieces. Although the gifts to the churches increase 
year by year, the total funds are divided with more and more 
agencies as the denominational program continues to expand. 
Thus our schools do not receive their proportionate share of the 
increase of funds at a time when their need is greatest. 

That, then, is the crisis which our program of Christian Edu- 
cation faces. What steps are to be taken to cope with it? Only three 
brief suggestions may be made here. First, we must increase our 
gifts to our schools and colleges both through the denominational 
channels and, directly, as individuals. Secondly, we must resist 
the secularization of education by sending more of our young 
people to Christan schools. And finally, we must develop a long- 
range denominational policy on Christian Education which will 
guarantee the schools a fair share of the total funds given by the 
churches. 

Respectfully su omitted, 

J. W. Angell, Chairman 

Dr. Marc Lovelace, Professor of Bible at Wake Forest 
College was presented and delivered an outstanding address 
on "Christian Education in the Home, Church and College." 

The Association adjourned by singing "Blest Be The Tie". 



LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 35 



OUR BELOVED DEAD 

ANGIER— Mrs. J. H. Hockaday, Mr. W. H. Smith, Mrs. Margaret 
Sorrell. 

ANTIOCH— Mr Oscar S. McAuley. 

BAPTIST CHAPEL— Mr. Robert Holt. 

BAPTIST GROVE— Mrs. Flora Gilbert, Mrs. Annie Johnson. 

BUIE'S CREEK— Mrs. Thomas H. Stewart, Mr. A. Paul Bagby, Jr., 
Mrs. Lillian Holland, Mr. V. A. Smith. 

CHALYBEATE SPRINGS— Mr. Fitzhugh Sherron. 

COATS — Mrs. Arthur Seagroves, Mrs. Mayton Upchurch, Mrs. A. 

F. Grimes. Mr. M. C. Stewart. 

DUNN, FIRST— Miss Myrtle Capps, Mr. J. F. Cannady, Mr. J. L. 
Hatcher, Deacon, Mr. Lafayette Norris, Mr. James G. Surles, 
Mrs. Marcella Tew, Mrs. Dewey Whittenton. 

ERWIN, EAST— Mrs. Nathan McLamb. Mrs. N. M. Horrell, Mr. 
Charlie Mason. 

ERWIN. FIRST— Mr. C. R. Parker, Mrs. C. R. Parker, Dr. Paul 

G. Parker. 

FRIENDSHIP— Mr. E. T. Byrd, Mrs. A. A. Bethune, Mr. J. B. 
Morgan. 

HOLLY SPRINGS — Mr. Lonnie Patterson. Mr. Prentice Sloan, Mr. 
M. C. Thomas, Deacon. 

LAYTON'S CHAPEL— Mr. C. T. Moore, Deacon, Mr. B. F. Matthews. 

LILLINGTON— Mr. Charles Rich, Mrs. M. B. McKinney. 

MACEDONIA— Mr. Coy Weathers. 

NEILL'S CREEK— Mrs. John Elmond Butts. Mr. N. A. Mat- 
thews. Deacon, Mrs. Vira Myatt. 

OAK GROVE— Mrs. Lula Cutts. 

PJNEY GROVE— Miss Lattie Oliver. 

PLEASANT MEMORY— Mr. H. C. Ousley. 

SWANN'S STATION— Mr. J. B. Wilson, Mrs. L. C. Lamm. 



36 LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



ORDAINED MINISTERS 

Name Address Church Membership Work 

J. W. Angell, Buie's Creek Buie's Creek Pastor 

J. L. Atkins, Raleigh, Rt. 4 ? Pastor 

R. E. Atkins, 27 Dixie Trail, Raleigh.. ? Pastor 

J. E. Ayscue, Buie's Creek .Buie's Creek Retired 

A. Paul Bagby, Buie's Creek .Buie's Creek Retired 

J. F. Blackmon, Buie's Creek Buie's Creek Retired 

W. T. Campbell, Fqy Spgs., Rt. 2 Neill's Creek Retired 

J. Ben Eller, Coats Coats Pastor 

C. T. Gray, New Hill, Rt. 3 ? Pastor 

R. F. Hall, Lillington Lillington Inactive 

A. C. Hayes, Spring Lake ? Pastor 

Julius Ho loway, Lillington X.illington Lillington 

C arles B. Howard, Buie's Creek Buie's Creek Pastor 

Sam F. Hudson. Lillington Lillington Pastor 

E. C Keller Dunn Dunn, Second Pastor 

Lester Mann. Durham. Rt. 4 Macedonia .... Licensed Pastor 

Forest Maxwell. Erwin Erwin, First Pastor 

V C. McCal , Bunnlevel Friendship Pastor 

R. E. Moore, Lillington J^illington Pastor 

Roy C. Parker. Buie's Creek Buie's Creek Lie. Pastor 

0. W. Pulley, Erwin Erwin, East Pastor 

C. E. Ruffin, Broadway Broadway Pastor 

E. P. Russell, Dunn Dunn, First Pastor 

1. K. Stafford, Buie's Creek Buie's Creek Pastor 

G. Van Stephens, Angier Angier Pastor 

Fulton Thomas, Buie's Creek ? Pastor 

T. Threat, Buie's Creek Buie's Creek Pastor 

G. Scott Turner, Jr., Wake Forest ? Pastor 

G. Scott Turner, Sr., Kipling Clhalybeate Spgs Pastor 

George Waddell, Angier Neill's Creek Lie. Pastor 

L. M. Yates, Bunnlevel, Rt. 1 Layton's Chpl Lie. Pastor 

MINISTERS LICENSED THIS YEAR 

Name Address Church 

Earl Davis Farthing, Dunn Dunn 

J. A. Hilliard, Fuquay Springs Kennebec 

Roy C. Parker, Buie's Creek Buie's Creek 

MINISTERS ORDAINED THIS YEAR 

Herman Moore, Jr., Clayton Cumberland Union 



LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 37 

STUDENTS FOR THE MINISTRY 

Name Church School 

Clyde Adams, Buie's Creek Campbell 

Carroll Barbour, Dunn. First Wake Forest 

Earl D. Farthing, Dunn, First Wake Forest 

T. M. Mishoe, Buie's Creek, Campbell 

Woodrow Neal, Buie's Creek Campbell 

William O'Neill, Buie's Creek Campbell 

Linwood Ragan, Piney Grove Campbell 

Odell Scott, Buie's Creek' Campbell 

Thurman Smith, Chalybeate Springs Wake Forest 

Tillman Smith, Chalybeate Springs Wake Forest 

James F. Sugg, Dunn, First Wayland (Texas) 

C. F. Thomas, Buie's Creek Campbell 

G. Scott Turner, Jr., Chalybeate Springs Wake Forest 

CHOIR DIRECTORS 

Church Name Address 

Angler Mrs. Kenneth Williams Angler 

Antioch Mrs. E. L. Powell Mamers 

Baptist Chapel A. L. Smith Sanford, Rt. 7 

Baptist Grove .Lenwood Howell Fuquay Springs 

Bethel Leland F Matthews Linden, Rt. 1 

Broadway H. A. Thomas Broadway 

Buie's Creek Mrs. Preston Stephenson Buie's Creek 

Chalybeate Spgs T. L. Caviness Fuquay Springs, Rt. 1 

Coats Miss Edith Allen Coats 

Cumberland Union....Herman Moore, Jr Clayton 

Dunn, First S. David Smith Buie's Creek 

Dunn, Second .B. O. Slaughter Dunn 

Erwin, East .W. C. Stone Erwin 

Erwin, First Mrs. Carl Byrd Erwin 

Friendship .Mrs. A. S. Byrd Bunnlevel 

Harmony H. S. Hedgepeth Bunnlevel, Rt. 1 

Holly Springs Nellie Nordan Broadway 

Kennebec Waymon Howard Angier, RFD 

Layton's Chpl Hartwell Butts Bunnlevel, Rt. 1 

Lillington .Mrs. Ruth Brown Lillington 

Macedonia J. E. Holt Holly Spgs., Rt. 1 

Neill's Creek Mrs. Alyda Smith Lillington, Rt. 1 

Oak Grove G. C. Denton Lillington, Rt. 1 

Piney Grove C. D. Jones Raleigh 

Pleasant Memory Lloyd Holloway Buie's Creek 

Rawls Henry Rawls Fuquay Spgs., Rt. 1 

Swann Station JR. A. Wilson Sanford, Rt. 6 



38 LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 

PIANISTS OR ORGANISTS 

Church Name Address 

Angier Mrs. Mary Massey Angler 

Antioch Miss Marjorie Stewart Lillington, Rt. 3 

Baptist Chapel Miss Nellie Howard Sanford, Rt. 7 

Baptist Grove Mantie Lou Rogers Fuquay Springs, RFD 

Bethel Mrs. H. W. Blalock Linden, Rt. 1^ 

Broadway Laura Rosser Broadway 

Buie's Creek Mrs. A. E. Lynch Buie's Creek 

Chalybeate Spgs Mrs. W. M. Pearson Chalybeate Spgs. 

Coats Mrs. Clem Godwin Coats 

Cumberland Union ....Mrs. Thomas Sears Fuquay Springs 

Duncan Mrs. A. E. Rollins Fuquay Spgs. Rt. 1 

Dunn, First Mrs. Charlie Upchurch Dunn 

Dunn, Second Marie S. Godwin Dunn 

Erwin. East Mrs. O. W. Pulley Erwin 

Erwin, First Mrs. D. C. Woodall Erwin 

Friendship Mrs. Roy Jones Bunnlevel 

Harmony Mrs. George R. Souders Lillington, Rt. 2 

Holly Springs Miss Dorothy Brown Mamers 

Kennebec Dwight Smith Willow Springs 

Layton's Chapel Mrs. John Fink Spring Lake, Rt. 1 

Lillington Miss Henretta O'Quinn Lillington 

Macedonia Helen Fay Truelove Holly Springs, Rt. 1 

Oak Grove Ada Denton Lillington, Rt. 1 

Piney Grove Mrs. Clara M. Adcock Holly Springs. Rt. 1 

Pleasant Memory Mrs. Carlie McLamb Coats, Rt. 1 

Rawls Mrs. Clinton Abernathy ....Fuquay Spgs., RFD 

Swann's Station Mrs. W. B. Castleberry Sanford, Rt. 6 

LIBRARIANS 

Church Name Address 

Antioch Miss Hazel Weaver Lillington, Rt. 3 

Dunn, First Miss Jo Hackett Dunn 

Harmony Miss Peggy Cash Lillington, Rt. 2 

Holly Springs Mrs. H. B. Patterson Broadway 



Does Pastor Live 
On Church Field? 



No. Years Present 
Pastor Has Served 



State Paper in 
Budget 



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Number Tithers 



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Revival Meetings 
Held 



Grand Total 
Present Membe rs 
Total Non-resident 
Members 



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Letters and Other 
Additions 



■>S<'^O00C^CqOC0CC|rHTt<05CD< 



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Baptisms 



Dates of 
Meeting 



Date 
Organized 



Location 
Rural V-T-C 



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Average 
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Vacation Bible 
School Enrollment 



Average 
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Grand Total 
Sunday School 

Enrollment 



Mission Sunday 
School Enrollment 



Officers Not 
Counted Classes 
and Departments 

Extension 
Department 



Adults 



Young People 



Intermediates 



Juniors 



Primaries 



Beginners 



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Average 
Attendance 



Grand Total 
Enrolled 



General Officers 
Enrolled 



Mission En- 
rollment 



Adults Enrolled 



Young People 
Enrolled 



Intermediates 
Enrolled 



Juniors Enrolled 






Primaries En- 
rolled 



Beginners Enrolled 



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Nursery Enrolled 



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Total Number 



Number Mission 
Unions 



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Adult Units 



OCqOHOr-irHoorHrHHiHr-lTHTHi?^ 



Number Young 
People Units 



OrHOinitHrH»-<Or-liHOrHOOt 



Number Inter- 
mediate Units 



No. Junior Units 



Number Primary 
Units 



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Number Beginner 
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Total Tithers All 
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Enrolled in 
Mission Study 



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Total Enrolled 



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Sunbeam En- 
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R. A. Enrolled 



G. A. Enrolled 



Y. W. A. Enrolled 



O(MOOOO<N0iMOO^t>OC0l>OI>-OOl>-OK:iOOOOO05 



W. M. S. Enrolled 



Total Units 



Sunbeam Units 



R. A. Units 



G. A. Units 



Y. W. A. Units 



W. M. S. Units 



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Goal Association 
Missions Coming 
Year 



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Goal Co-operative 
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Value of Church 
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Value Pastor's 
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Meets Held in Year 



Enrollment of 
Brotherhood 



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Grand Total Local 
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Pastor's Salary- 



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Other Local 
Expenses 



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Local Missions and 
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Literature, Song- 
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Total Salaries (Do 
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All Other Receipts 
Through All Or- 
ganizations for Year 



Money Borrowed 
Sale of Property, 
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Total Church Debt 
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Grand Total 
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All Purposes 



Total Expenditure 
for Missions 



Relief and Annuity, 
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Designated 
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POPH PTO. CO.. DUNN, N. C. 



LITTLE RIVER 

BAPTIST 

ASSOCIATION 

North Carolina 



Seventy-Sixth Annual Session 

Meeting With 

BUIPS CREEK BAPTIST CHURCH 

October 30th, 1951 

The next regular session of the Association will meet with 

the Lillington Baptist Church on Tuesday after the 

fourth Sunday in October, 1952 

The annual sermon will be preached by Rev. L. M. Woolweaver 
Rev. T. W. Williams, Alternate 



LITTLE RIVER 

BAPTIST 

ASSOCIATION 

North Carolina 



Seventy-Sixth Annual Session 

Meeting With 

BUIE'S CREEK BAPTIST CHURCH 

October 30th, 1951 

The next regular session of the Association will meet with 

the Lillington Baptist Church on Tuesday after the 

fourth Sunday in October, 1952 

The annual sermon will be preached by Rev. L. M. Woolweaver 
Rev. T. W. Williams, Alternate 



LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



INDEX 



ASSOCIATIONAL DIRECTORY 5 

CHOIR DIRECTORS 49 

CHURCH DIRECTORS 48 

CONSTITUTION 10 

HISTORICAL TABLE BEGINS 51 

OUR BELOVED DEAD 47 

ORDAINED MINISTERS 48 

LIBRARIANS 50 

LIST OF MESSENGERS 8 

PROCEEDINGS 12 

PROGRAM 15 

PIANIST OR ORGANISTS 50 

STATISTICAL TABLES BEGIN 51 

STUDENTS FOR THE MINISTRY 49 

REPORTS 

AMERICAN BIBLE SOCIETY 40 

ASSOCIATIONAL MISSIONARY 30 

BAPTIST HOME FOR AGING 25 

BAPTIST HOSPITAL 27 

BAPTIST ORPHANAGE 29 

BAPTIST TRAINING UNION 38 

BUDGET COMMITTEE 33 

EVANGELISM 29 

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 12 

MISSIONS REPORT 17 

MODERATORS REPORT 20 

RELIEF AND ANNUITY 24 

RESOLUTIONS COMMITTEE 34 

SOCIAL SERVICE REPORT 42 

SUNDAY SCHOOL 37 

TREASURER'S REPORT 13 

WOMAN'S MISSIONARY UNION 36 




DR. A. PAUL BAGBY 



To Whom This Annual Is Dedicated By Order Of The 
General Session Of The Association 

Dr. Alfred Paul Bagby was born at Russellville, Kentucky, Feb- 
ruary 4, 1880, the son of the Reverend George Franklin and Mary Court- 
ney Bagby. He was educated at the University of Richmond, Richmond, 
Virginia, from which he was graduated with the A. B. degree in 1898, 
and with the M. A. degree in 1899, and at the Southern Baptist Theo- 
logical Seminary, Louisville, Kentucky, where he was awarded the 
degree of Doctor of Theology in 1906. He was ordained to the gospel 
ministry in 1906. Since that time he has held many distinguished 
pulpits, including that of the Highland Baptist Church, Louisville, 



4 L ITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 

Kentucky; First Baptist Church, Glasgow, Kentucky; First Baptist 
Church, Williamsburg, Kentucky; and the Wake Forest, Wilson, Louis- 
burg, and Buie's Creek Baptist churches in North Carolina. He has 
served on the Relief and Annuity Board of the Southern Baptist Con- 
vention, and on the General Board of the North Carolina Baptist Con- 
vention, of which he was at one time chairman. In addition, Dr. Bagby 
has always manifested an active interest in civic and social affairs, 
and he is a member of the Masonic Lodge. While in college he excelled 
in sports, playing football, baseball and tennis; four times he won the 
Amateur Golf Championship of Kentucky. 

Dr. Bagby is a striking example of Christian character and achieve- 
ment. For many years he has been known throughout the south as an 
outstanding preacher, and in him scholarship and Christian devotion 
have been wonderfully balanced. Always full of good humor and in- 
tensely interested in many areas of life, he is a benediction upon all 
who know him. It is with gratitude that this Association acknowledges 
its debt to him by the dedication of the Minutes of 1951. 



DIRECTORY 
of The Association 

1. GENERAL OFFICERS OF THE ASSOCIATION 

Moderator L. H. Campbell, Buie's Creek 

Vice-Moderator H. Paul Strickland, Dunn 

Clerk W. A. Johnson, Lillington 

Treasurer Berles C. Johnson, Lillington, Rt. 1 

2. EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE MEMBERS 

Moderator L. H. Campbell, Buie's Creek 

Vice-Moderator H. Paul Strickland, Dunn 

Clerk W. A. Johnson, Lillington 

Treasurer Berles C. Johnson, Lillington, Rt. 1 

S. S. Superintendent Julius Holloway, Lillington 

B. T. U. Director Lonnie Small, Buie's Creek 

W. M. U. President Mrs. D. B. Andrews, Fuquay Springs, Rt. 2 

Supt. Evangelism G. Scott Turner, Angier, Rt. 2 

Associational Missionary R. E. Moore, Lillington 

E. P. Russell Dunn 

J. Ben Eller Coats 

D. B. Dean Lillington 

3. ASSOCIATIONAL MISSIONARY 

Rev. R. E. Moore Lillington 

4. W. M. U. ASSOCIATIONAL OFFICERS 

Superintendent Mrs. D. B. Andrews, Fuquay Springs, Rt. 2 

Associate Superintendent Mrs. L. M. Woolweaver, Mamers 

Secretary-Treasurer Mrs. H. M. O'Ouinn, Mamers 

Young People's Leader Mrs. R. E. Moore, Lillington 

Royal Ambassador Counselor ....Mr. Earle Holleman, Fuquay Spgs. 

Mission Study Chairman Mrs. G. Van Stephens, Angier 

Stewardship Chairman Miss Lillian Draughon, Dunn, Rt. 5 

Margaret Fund Chm Mrs. L. B. Smith, Fuquay Springs, Rt. 2 

Training School Chairman Mrs. Forrest Maxwell, Erwin 

Literature Chairman Mrs. James G. Tutor 

White Cross Chairman Mrs. A. C. Barefoot, Angier 

5 



LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



5. ASSOCIATIONAL SUNDAY SCHOOL OFFICERS 

Superintendent Julius Holloway, Lillington 

Enlargement E. P. Russell, Dunn 

Training G. Van Stephens, Angier 

Evangelism G. Scott Turner, Angier, Rt. 2 

Vacation Bible School Miss Pat Byrd, Mamers 

Secretary Mrs. Pauline Denning, Lillington 

Departmental Superintendents: 

Extension Mrs. Leslie Turlington, Buie's Creek 

Adult Wilbur Chalk, Dunn 

Young People Miss Hazel Matthews, Kipling 

Intermediate Mrs. Carl Gregory, Erwin, RED 

Juniors Miss Zula Rogers, Mamers 

Primary Miss Vara Lee Thornton, Dunn 

Beginners Miss Ruby Williams, Buie's Creek 

Cradle Roll .Mrs. H. M. O'Ouinn, Mamers 

Nursery Miss Evelyn Straughn, Dunn 

Group Superintendents: 

No. 1 C. D. Bain Dunn 

No. 2 W. M. Morgan Angier 

No. 3 E. J. Holleman Fuquay Springs 

No. 4 Mrs. Mack Byrd Bunnlevel 

No. 5 R. U. McNeill ....Broadway 

6. ASSOCIATIONAL B. T. U. OFFICERS 

Director ....Lonnie Small, Buie's Creek 

Associate Director Truby Powell, Lillington 

Secretary-Treasurer Mrs. Robert H. Morgan, Buie's Creek 

Chorister T. W. Williams, Lillington 

Pianist ....Henrietta O'Quinn, Lillington 

Pastor-Advisor A. C. McCall, Bunnlevel 

Department Leaders: 

Story Hour Leader Mrs. Thurman Collins, Mamers 

Junior Leader Mrs. W. E. Bethune, Bunnlevel 

Intermediate Leader Mrs. E. L. Powell, Mamers 

Young People's Leader ..Ed. Williford, Dunn 

Adult Leader Miss Lillian Draughon, Dunn 

Group Leaders: 

No. 1. L. L. Coats Dunn 

No. 2 Steadman Ray Angier, Rt. 2 

No. 3 W. E. Medlin Fuquay Springs 

No. 4 David Jones..... Bunnlevel 

No. 5 Erma Knight Broadway 



LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



7. STANDING COMMITTEES 

Presbytery and Pulpit: 

G. Van Stephens Angier 

G. Scott Turner.... Angier, Rt. 2 

J. Ben Eller ..Coats 

E. P. Russell ..Dunn 

Chm. on Christian Literature Mrs. L. Jackson, Erwin 

Chm. on Hospital.. Dr. A. W. Pecde, Lillington 

Chm. on Missions..... Mrs. D. B. Andrews, Fuquay Springs, Rt. 2 

Chm. on Temperance A. C. McCall, Bunnlevel 

Chm. on Ministers' Annuities C. D. Bain, Dunn 

Chm. on Christian Education Owen Odum, Coats 

Chm. on American Bible Society ..Mrs. W. E. Nichols, Coats 

Chm. on Orphanage Mrs. I. K. Stafford, Buie's Creek 



LIST of MESSENGERS 

ANGIER Herndon Wells, C. W. Flowers, and Mrs. R. L. Young 

ANTIOCH Mrs. H. M. O'Ouinn, Mrs. L. M. Woolweaver, Rev. 

L. M. Woolweaver, E. B. O'Quinn and Lee O'Quinn 

BAPTIST CHAPEL Deas Dickens, J. M. Dickens and Frank 

Hinant 

BAPTIST GROVE J. H. Rogers, W. E. Hardee, Raymond 

Gilbert and R. W. Wester 

BETHEL 

BROADWAY Owen Taylor, Mrs. Lois Stone, Connie Thomas, 

Leslie Pittman and Mrs. Rena Thomas 

BUIE'S CREEK B. P. Marshbanks, T. T. Lanier, E. A. Howard, 

Mrs. J. T. Bland, and Mrs. J. F. Blackmon 

CHALYBEATE SPRINGS G. R. Wells, Mrs. D. B. Andrews, 

Mrs. C. K. Smith, E. W. Smith, and Kenneth Smith 

COATS Mrs. W. D. Moore, Owen Beasley, Johnny Barnes, Mrs. 

J. B. Filer and Mrs. Exie Smith 

CUMBERLAND UNION Mrs. Nealie Abernathy, Mrs. Henry 

Farrell, John Sears, Mrs. Thomas Sears and Mrs. John Sears 

DUNCAN Mrs. Altie Tutor, J. D. O'Conncll, Scott Turner, Jr., 

and Mrs. Scott Turner, Jr. 

DUNN, FIRST H. Paul Strickland, Mrs. Allen H. A. Lee, Dr. 

C. D. Bain, Miss Lillian Draughon and E. Ralph Maxwell 

DUNN, SECOND 

ERWIN, EAST W. C. Stone, Mrs. C. M. Baker, Mrs. Donnie 

Smith, Mrs. Clyde Lambuth and Mrs. W. J. Davis 

ERWIN, FIRST 

FRIENDSHIP A. F. Jones, John Cameron and Mrs. A. C. 

McCall 

HARMONY Mrs. George Souders, Mrs. Euna Wilson, John 

Morgan, Glenn Hamilton and S. A. Lanier 

8 



LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 9 

HOLLY SPRINGS Mrs. B. B. Wilson, Miss Myrtle Thomas, 

D. J. Pittman, R. U. McNeill and Pierce Patterson 

KENNEBEC M. T. Olive, Walter Upchurch, Waymon Howard, 

Ernest Hare and Norwood Moore 

LAYTON'S CHAPEL Mrs. L. K. Clark, Mrs. Catherine West, 

Mrs. J. W. Fink and J. W. Fink 

LILLINGTON W. H. Parrish, Mrs. N. W. Maness and D. B. 

Dean 

MACEDONIA J. E. Holt, Leo Weathers, C. O. Hold, Paul 

O'Connell and J. C. Smith 

NEILL'S CREEK W. T. Campbell, Stedman Ray, J. B. Keith, 

Sidney Gregory and Mrs. N. A. Matthews 

OAK GROVE Curtis Byrd, Huie Byrd, Mrs. S. C. Horton, G. C. 

Denton and Clyde Pate 

PINEY GROVE W. E. Medlin, J. C. Betts, G. L. Howell, M. C. 

Honeycutt and R. E. Austin 

PLEASANT MEMORY Mrs. Talmon Penny, W. L. Franklin, 

Mrs. Carlie McLamb, Ben Upchurch and Mrs. Ben Upchurch 

RAWLS Mrs. Rex Bradley, Mrs. Rufus Moore, Miss Beatrice 

Rawls, Henry Rawls and Chester Snipes 

SWANN'S STATION Robert Godfrey, Mrs. Robert Godfrey, 

Richard Batchelor, Clayton Gregg and J. P. Graham 



CONSTITUTION 

1. This association shall be known as "Little River Baptist 
Association." 

2. The object of this association shall be the advancement of 
the Kingdom of Christ, and the means of accomplishing this shall 
be in strict conformity with the principles of the New Testament. 

3. The association shall have no authority over the internal right 
of any church belonging to it and shall act only as an advisory council. 

4. The association shall be composed of messengers chosen by 
the churches connected with it, each church being entitled to five 
delegates. Ordained ministers having oversight of churches in the 
association, or having their membership in these churches, shall also 
be received as messengers. 

5. A quorum shall consist of messengers from a majority of the 
churches of the association. 

6. The messengers from each church to the annual meeting of the 
association shall bear a letter certifying their appointment and giv- 
ing an account of the condition of the church and a statement of all 
funds contributed for local and benevolent purposes. 

7. The officers of the association shall be a moderator, a vice- 
moderator, a clerk and a treasurer, who shall be chosen annually 
from the members composing the association, and shall continue 
in office until their successors are elected. The term of office of the 
moderator shall begin at the conclusion of the session at which he is 
elected and continue until the close of the next annual meeting. 

8. It shall be the duty of the moderator to preside during the 
deliberations of the body, to enforce the observance of the constitution, 
preserve the decorum, appoint committees except when other provi- 
sions are made for their appointment, decide all questions of order, 
giving his opinion on any question under discussion, and cast the de- 
ciding vote in case of a tie. 

9. It shall be the duty of the clerk to record the proceedings of 
each annual meeting of the association, superintend the printing of 
the minutes and their distribution among the churches. 

10. It shall be the duty of the treasurer to receive all funds sent 
by the churches or collected during the sessions of this body and to 
disburse the same for the objects stated. He shall present a report on 
all funds administered by him at each annual meeting. 

10 



LITTLE RR'ER BAPTIST ASSOCIATIOX U 

11. The association shall appoint annually an Executive Promotion 
Committee of 12 members, among whom by virture of their office are 
to be the moderator, vice-moderator, clerk-treasurer. S. S. Supt. of the 
Association. Training Union Director. W. M. U. Superintendent. Supt. 
of Evangelism, the Associational :\Iissionary. This committee shall 
have general supervision of the affairs of the association during the 
interval between the meetings of the body: shall seek to promote the 
welfare of the churches, and their active participation in the causes 
fostered by the denomination; but shall be answerable to the associ- 
ation for its acts, and make an annual report to the association of its 
work. The Executive Promotion Committee shall meet once each quart- 
er and upon other occasions on the call of the moderator. 

12. The association in annual meeting shall appoint a presbytery 
of four members to sit with the pastor of any person whose ordination 
is sought, and the moderator of the association, to examine the quali- 
fications and opportunities for vs'ork of the candidate. 

13. The association shall hold an annual meeting commencing on 
Tuesday after the fourth Sunday in October. 

14. A meeting of the association may be called by the moderator 
at any time by the consent of five members of the Executive committee. 
Each church shall be notified of such a meeting in time to send dele- 
gates. 

15. This association shall have the right to exclude from its mem- 
bership any church that departs from Xew Testament principles. 

16. Any church desiring to become a member of this association 
may present a petition at the annual meeting of the body through 
delegates appointed for this purpose. If the association shall consent 
to receive such church the moderator shall extend the hand of fellov\-- 
ship to the delegates. 

17. The association may invite visitors to seats and extend to them 
all the privileges of the delegates except that of voting. 

18. By appointment, at each annual meeting, an introductory ser- 
mon, and a sermon or address on missions shall be delivered. 

19. This constitution may be amended at any annual session, by 
a vote of two-thirds of the delegates present, provided that notice 
shall be given in the morning session of the day on which such motion 
will be presented. 



PROCEEDINGS 



MORNING SESSION 

1. Moderator L. H. Campbell called the Association to order 
at the Buie's Church Baptist Church at 9:30 a. m. Oct. 30, 1951. 
The meeting began with the singing of "I Will Sing The Wondr- 
ous Story," led by Rev. T. Williams. 

2. Rev. J. Ben Eller, Pastor of the Coats Baptist Church, 
led the devotional. Brother Eller read Matthew 20:1-16 and led 
in prayer. 

3. The Clerk called the roll of Churches belonging to the 
Association, and all Churches, except Dunn Second, were rep- 
resented. The messengers from the Dunn Second Church came in 
later in the morning. 

4. Rev. T. W. Williams moved that the official messengers 
present constitute the Seventy-Sixth Annual Session of the Little 
River Baptist Association', and said motion, upon being seconded 
by Rev. R. E. Moore, was passed by unanimous vote. 

5. Moderator Campbell then expressed his pleasure over the 
fact that the session was meeting with the Buie's Creek Church 
and extended a warm welcome on behalf of said church and 
Campbell College. 

6. The Moderator recognized Rev. T. W. Williams and Rev. 
Herman Moore as new pastors in the Association and also recog- 
nized and welcomed the following visiting pastors: Rev. Earl 
Rogers, Pastor of the Wendell Baptist Church and Moderator of 
the Raleigh Association; Rev. W. M. Page, Pastor of the Fuquay 
Springs Baptist Church and his wife; and Rev. J. M. Page of the 
Raleigh Association. 

7. Rev. G. Scott Turner was called upon to read the report 
of the Executive Committee. The report as presented by Rev. 
Turner and adopted by the Association reads as follows: 

REPORT OF THE EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

Brother Moderator and Brethren: 

The Executive Committee of this Association, in a meeting at 
Lillington, May 23, 1951 requested the churches of the Association 

12 



LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 13 

to assist in the establishment of a Baptist Church in the area near 
Godfrey's Store in Anderson Creek Township. 

In a meeting at Buie's Creek, September 10, the following changes 
in the Constitution of the Association were recommended by unanimous 
vote of the Committee. 

(I) That the present article 12 of the constitution be amended 
by adding "The Executive Promotion Committee shall meet once each 
quarter and upon other occasions upon the call of the Moderator." 

(II) That article 20 be amended by striking out the words "before 
the day" and inserting in their place the words "in the morning session." 

(III) That the word "Delegates" be stricken out wherever it ap- 
pears in the constitution and the word "messengers" be inserted in its 
place. 

(IV) That Article eleven (11) of the constitution be stricken in 
its entirety. 

(V) That Article 12 be amended by inserting the word "Promo- 
tion" between the words Executive and Committee in the first line 
of such article. 

I request that this be received as formal notice that such amend- 
ments to the constitution will be presented in the afternoon session. 

Respectively submitted, 
G. Scott Turner 

8. At the request of the Moderator, Brother J. C. Bullock, 
Treasurer of the Association, read the following report: 

TREASURER'S REPORT 

Report of J. C. Bullock, Treasurer of Little River Association 
Missions and Minute Funds (October 1, 1950 through Sept. 30, 1951). 

Balance in Bank of Lillington October 1, 1950 $ 127.00 

Receipts: 

Angler 234.84 

Antioch 267.50 

Baptist Chapel 15.00 

Baptist Grove 46.93 

Bethel 55.50 

Broadway 25.00 

Buie's Creek 210.00 

Chalybeate Springs 80.00 

Coats 275.96 



14 LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 

Cumberland Union .._ 10.00 

Duncan 30.50 

Dunn 1st 530.00 

Dunn 2nd 35.00 

Erwin 1st 110.00 

Erwin 2nd - 10.00 

Friendship 135.00 

Harmony 10.00 

Holly Springs 75.00 

Kennebec 

Layton's Chapel 85.00 

Lillington 210.00 

Macedonia --- 79.00 

Neil's Creek 150.08 

Oak Grove " 60.91 

Piney Grove 37.50 

Pleasant Memory 7.00 

Rawls - - - 49.31 

Swanns Station 40.00 

Baptist State Convention 1,320.00 

Receipts from Evangelistic Crusade 414.75 



Total Receipts $4,736.78 

EXPENDITURES: 

Total Expenses of Evangelistic Crusade $ 287.70 

Pope Printing Co. (Minutes, etc.) 220.00 

Gray & Creech (Supplies) 43.92 

M. A. Huggins (Retirement Fund) 254.07 

To R. E. Moore (Salary) 2,340.30 

To R. E. Moore (Expenses) 1,500.00 



Total Expenditures $4,645.99 

Balance in Bank— September 30, 1951 . 90.79 



$4,736.78 

RECEIPTS & EXPENDITURES: 

(October 1, 1951 through October 10, 1951) 

Balance in Bank— October 1st, 1951 $ 90.79 

Receipts: 

Angier 21.91 

Baptist Grove 12.10 

Broadway 10.00 

Buie's Creek 120.00 



LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 15 

Cumberland Union 10.00 

Erwin 1st 100.00 

Layton's Chapel 15.00 

Lillington _ . _ 25.00 

Neil's Creek 33.41 

Pleasant Memory . 15.00 

Swanns Station 10.00 

Miss Zula Rogers . . 8.95 

Total $ 472.16 

EXPENDITURES 

: Julius Holloway (S. S. Expense) $ 15.40 

R. E. Moore (Balance Last Years Salary) 187.63 

Total Expenditures $ 203.03 

Balance as of October 11, 1951 269.13 

$ 472.16 

Upon motion of Rev. Turner, duly seconded, the Treasurer's 
Report was accepted and Mr. Bullock was commended for his 
good work. 

9. The program for the session, with "Our Cooperative Ef- 
forts To Meet the World Crisis" as the general theme, was pre- 
sented by the Moderator. The program as presented and adopted 
reads as follows: 

PROGRAM 

Seventy-Sixth Annual Session 

LITTLE RIVER ASSOCIATION 

BUIE'S CREEK BAPTIST CHURCH OCTOBER 30. 1951 
THEME: 

''Our Cooperative Efforts To Meet 
The World Crisis" 

MODERATOR: L. H. CAMPBELL 

Director of Music: T. W. Williams 

Pianist: Mrs. A. E. Lynch 



16 LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 

9: 30-WORSHIP J. Ben Eller 

9:45-ORGANIZATION And BUSINESS 

10:10-MODERATOR'S REPORT 
SPECIAL MUSIC 

10:20-MEMORIALS .Mrs. Charles B. Howard 

10:30-COOPERATIVE EFFORTS IN MISSIONS 

Missions Mrs. L. M. Woolweaver 

Report on Recommendations of the 

Committee of 19 J. W. Angell 

Discussion and Questions 

Mission Address Henry E. Walden 

12:00-SERMON E. P. Russell 

12:30-ADJOURNMENT For Lunch 

1:30-WORSHIP J. L. Atkins 

l:45-COOPERATIVE EFFORTS IN SOCIAL SERVICE 

Relief and Annuity C. D. Bain 

N. C. Baptist Homes James M. Hayes 

N. C. Baptist Hospital A. W. Peede 

N. C. Baptist Orphanage Mrs. I. K. Stafford 

Discussion and Questions 

2:30-COOPERATIVE EFFORT TO STRENGTHEN THE 
HOME BASE 

Report on Evangelism G. Scott Turner 

Associational Mission Work R. E. Moore 

Discussion 

3:00-ADDRESS 

"A Program for A Rural Church"... Arthur Stainback 

3:30-BUSINESS 

4:00-ADJOURNMENT 

SUPPER 

7: 15-WORSHIP L. M. Woolweaver 

7:30-COOPERATIVE EFFORTS IN TRAINING AND EDU- 
CATION 

W. M. U Mrs. D. B. Andrews 

Sunday School Julius Holloway 

B. T. U Bennie Slaughter 



LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 17 

Christian Colleges Owen Odum 

Literature Mrs. L. Jackson 

American Bible Society Mrs. W. E. Nichols 

8:00-COOPERATIVE EFFORTS IN FINANCING OUR PRO- 
GRAM (Panel Discussion) 

The Individual Mrs. J. Ben Eller 

Church Budget Berles Johnson 

Cooperative Program Forrest Maxwell 

8:30-COOPERATIVE EFFORTS FOR SOCIAL RIGHTEOUS- 
NESS-REPORT A. C. McCall 

Address James M. Hayes 

Program Committee L. H. Campbell, G. S. Turner, 

R. E. Moore 

10. Following the adoption of the program, a male quartet 
from Campbell College rendered two musical selections. 

11. Mrs. Charles B. Howard read the names of the church 
members in the Association who had died during the preceding 
year. Following the reading of these names, a complete list of 
which is set out in these minutes on page 47, Mrs. Howard 
read a passage of scripture and Dr. Angell led in prayer. 

12. Mrs. L. M. Woolweaver read the report on Missions. Her 
report, as adopted, reads as follows: 

REPORT ON MISSIONS 

The responsibility to win the lost to Christ is the supreme task 
of every Christian and of every church. Without exception we are to 
go unto the ends of the earth and preach the gospel to every creature. 
The starting point is the home base; or as Jesus put it, "beginning 
at Jerusalem." This means Associational Missions. Next in line come, in 
the respective order, State, Home and Foreign Missions, or as Jesus said: 
"Unto all nations." 

This is not a task which can be accomplished by one church, 
or by any of the agencies operating independently. It requires the co- 
operative and concerted efforts of every member of every church in 
the denomination, and the use of every means and agency therein to 
present the comprehensive program necessary to tell the world of Christ 
and His redemptive work. 

ASSOCIATIONAL MISSIONS 

Each local church may study about, contribute to and pray for 
missions, and still there would remain areas that would not be reach- 
ed within the bounds of our Association. To head up this program we 



18 LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



have employed an Associational Missionary, to whom has been delegated 
the responsibility to promote every phase of our Baptist work. He is 
closely connected with all the departments of the Convention, and 
the Woman's Missionary Union. He promotes evangelism and aids 
churches in securing pastors. He assists the smaller churches in fostering 
a well rounded program. Much help has been given in Vacation Bible 
Schools, Clinics, Schools of Missions and Study Courses in the various 
churches. The Convention cooperates with the Association in making 
this program possible, but the larger part of funds must come directly 
from the local church into the Associational Missions fund. 

STATE MISSIONS 

As we leave our immediate communities and launch out a little 
deeper, we come into our State Mission Program. Let us bear in mind 
that this Program has as it's main objective, "North Carolina for 
Christ." Thirteen cents out of the Cooperative Program dollar goes 
for this work, but State Missions must depend largely upon the offer- 
ings from the Woman's Missionary Union in September, and the 
churches in October. 

As we contribute to this phase of our work, we are helping our 
seven Baptist Colleges, and our Baptist Hospital. We share in the 
entire Program which also includes: Purchase of lots for new churches; 
Aid to missionary pastors; Maintenance of the Departments of Sunday 
School, Training Union and Student Union; Rural Church; Schools 
for Ministers and Deacons; Mission Schools; Assembly Program; Bap- 
tist Brotherhood; Work Among the Silent People and the Baptist 
Book Stores. ^ 

As we look unto the fields in our own state we see evidence of 
God's blessings upon the work and the challenge to enlarge the Pro- 
gram, realizing that the "light that shines farthest, shines brightest 
at home." 

HOME MISSIONS 

From the very beginning, the fields of service, and the task of 
the Home Mission Board have gradually expanded. They have widened 
in reach until today the territory stretches from the Atlantic to the 
Pacific, and also includes Alaska, Panama, Cuba and the Canal Zone. 

To meet the needs of the denomination for greater and more 
permanent support, the Home Mission Board is launching a Five Year 
Crusade, for more converts, more churches and more effective witness- 
ing. In the 1950-51 period the emphasis has been on Evangelism. In 
1951-52 the emphasis will be upon church extension, with the purpose 
of organizing new Baptist churches, more mission stations, and lead- 
ing all the churches into a soul winning program. 



LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 19 

In 1950 the Home Mission Board had 1,025 missionaries, including 
271 student workers. These workers are distributed among the various 
phases of the work carried on which includes: Ministering to thirty- 
seven different Nationalities in the Homeland; Work among the Ne- 
groes, Indians, Jews, Migrants; Good Will Centers; City Missions; Ru- 
ral Church Program; Department of Evangelism; Church Building Loan 
Fund and other phases. 

The Southern Baptist Home Missions Magazine, monthly publica- 
tion of the Board, now has a circulation of 130,000. This magazine 
should be in every Baptist home. 

The Home Mission task is greater today than ever before. There 
is more territory to be served; there are more people to be reached; 
and more souls to be won to Christ. Truly, the fields here in the 
homeland are white unto harvest. Surely, we shall meet today's chal- 
lenge by giving of our means to support this program of "Evangelizing 
the Unevangelized," for we know that we cannot give to the world 
at large that which we do not possess at home. 

FOREIGN MISSIONS 

Our responsibility does not end with the work in the Homeland 
and adjacent territory, but the Field is the World. How wonderfully 
blessed we are in having the Foreign Mission Board to head up this 
work and see to it that the gospel is preached in other lands. 

In 1950 a new record was set, in the appointment of 111 mission- 
aries, exceeding by 35 the largest previous record. Work has begun 
this year in three new countries: Southern Rhodesia in Africa; and 
Ecuador and Peru in South America. Our work also includes the Gold 
Coast and Nigeria; The Orient, including China, Japan and Hawaii; 
the Near East, including Palestine, Lebanon and Arabia; Europe, in- 
cluding Spain, Italy and Switzerland; and Latin America, which includes 
Chile, Colombia, Mexico, Paraguay, Uraguay, Brazil, Guatemala and 
Argentina. 

As we look upon our world today we can readily see that Advance 
in Missions is the answer to many of the grave problems. Communism 
continues to spread, and world unrest in other parts makes Advance 
difficult. But it has always been when times were darkest that Christi- 
anity spread more rapidly. We cannot afford to stand still. We must 
give and support Missions as we have never done before, realizing 
that only as we give will we have a world at all. We are living in a 
country that is overflowing with material prosperity. The results will 
be expressed in greed or in stewardship. 

While it has been necessary to re-locate China missionaries due 
to the rapid spread of Communism, we are not to think that our efforts 



20 LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 

and money invested in China have been futile. God is inside the 
curtain which is settling around China, and also there are many thou- 
sands of Chinese Christians, many of whom are trained, and are lead- 
ers among their people. They are a great strength to the people of 
China today. Dr. Baker James Cauthen says, "God often uses difficulties 
in one area as an occasion of sending his message into other lands 
where witness is needed. This is taking place today as a result of the 
impossibility of projecting mission service in China." 

Dr. Kenneth Scott Latourette says, "The total annual contribution 
to missions, home and foreign, of all evangelical churches would not 
build and equip one modern battleship. The entire Protestant foreign 
mission force is scarcely as large as a modern Army division." 

From a recent hymn by Garland Hopkins: 

"The times in which our lives are lived 

Are like a chastening rod. 
Our world, confused and changing, calls 

Advance, church of God." 

Respectively submitted, 
Mrs. L. M. Woolweaver 

13. Dr. J. W. Angell gave a report on the Recommendations 
of the Committee of Nineteen of the State Baptist Convention 
and after reading said report moved that it be approved by this 
Association. Following some discussion, the motion of Dr. Angell 
was carried. 

14. Moderator Campbell announced that because of insuffici- 
ent time he would forego the reading of his report to the Asso- 
ciation. However, his report as prepared is incorporated in these 
minutes and reads as follows: 

MODERATOR'S REPORT 

On this dividing line between the old year and the new, we first 
look backward, fondly hoping for evidences of progress toward our 
long range objectives. But if the best is yet to be, we must just as 
eagerly search for lessons from our mistakes and failures, always 
conscious that our future is now. 

It is gratifying to observe from the summaries of the past year's 
record as compiled by our Associational Missionary that advances 
have been made during the past year in practically every phase of 
our work. Our total church membership today of 8,805 in our 28 
churches represents an increase of 174 over 1950. Our several church 
agencies, including the Sunday School, Training Union and W. M. U. 
groups, all show increased memberships. Our total church offerings 



LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 21 

for last year, amounting to $200,379.50, show an increase of $45,583.68 
over 1950. Finally, partly due perhaps to our simultaneous revival 
campaigns, we report 459 baptisms for the year, or a gain of 120 over 
the previous year. 

But how great progress do these figures represent in our struggle 
for ultimate victory over the forces of evil in our midst? A prominent 
Methodist minister summed up our problem last Sunday in his sermon 
topic: ':'A Christian Minority Facing A Secular Majority." After 1900 
years, even in this favored land of Bibles, our society is largely secular. 
Even in the face of growing church memberships, crime is increasing, 
especially among the young. Why this apparent paradox? 

After relating the parable of the unjust steward, Jesus observed 
that "the children of this world are in their generation wiser than the 
children of light." Might Southern Baptist, and Little River Baptists 
in particular, learn from hard-headed business leaders valuable lessons 
for conducting our sacred Kingdom business? How is it that in spite 
of our wanton waste in wars and preparations for war Americans to- 
day have twice as much in consumer goods per capita as we enjoyed 
in 1910? 

For one thing, business knows what it wants and subordinates 
everything else to the creation of profits. Christians, on the other 
hand, dedicate too often only their left-overs to the promotion of 
God's work. The Christian concept of Stewardship is given only lip 
service by most of us 8000 Little River Baptists.Does this not in large 
measure account for the fact that it took on an average 25 of us last 
year to add another one by baptism? The situation calls for a new 
dedication to our supreme task and the enlistment of our great army 
of unenlisted. 

Next to this all-important singleness of purpose, perhaps efficient 
organization is most responsible for the marvelous success of modern 
business. On the other hand, how poorly are many of our churches 
organized to carry on God's work. Efficient organization must include 
manning of all our church agencies from the front office down to the 
lowest ranks with capable, well-trained leadership, if we are to match 
the wisdom of "the children of this world." Then imagine what would 
happen if business organizations followed the pattern of many churches 
that depend upon absentee leadership for most of the week. How can 
our churches ever develop greater efficiency while their pastors live 
miles away from their work, except for week-end visits and emergency 
calls? This Association has for years stressed the need that part-time 
pastors live among their people on well-planned fields, but we learn 
very slowly. Why not take a lesson from business and conduct during 
the next year clinics on church organization for greater efficiency? 



22 LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 

Another essential to business success in this highly competitive 
society is the adoption of scientifically proven methods of doing busi- 
ness. Elimination of waste in time, in cost of operation, and in human 
energy creates greater production and greater profits in business, and 
if applied to church work will cause the Kingdom of God to prosper 
in our hands. Too frequently we continue wasteful methods which more 
successful churches have abandoned. Allow me to mention briefly 
three suggestions that some of our churches should consider. (1) Ex- 
perience has taught that the old custom of calling pastors for just one 
year helps to create divisions in the church and prevents a pastor 
from making long-range plans. Most Baptist churches today extend 
their pastors calls for an indefinite period, or until God seems to lead 
pastor and Congregation to make a change. 

(2) Leading churches today, both in the cities and in the country, 
set for themselves at the beginning of the year worthy goals to strive 
toward and then call upon each member of the church to accept by 
faith his part in this program. We do more when we strive for definite 
goals. That is why most progressive churches adopt annual budgets 
and conduct the every-member canvas to enlist every member in the 
program. Several pastors and church leaders in our Association should 
prayerfully consider this forward step for next year. It has brought 
wonderful results elsewhere. Our Associational Missionary will gladly 
help any church in working out such a plan for doing God's work. 

(3) It is gratifying to observe the increased interest in study 
courses for improving our methods of work for deacons, Sunday School 
and training leaders, and soul winners. We must increase our know- 
how. Greater success will come with the use of better methods. 

A fourth very important lesson Baptists can learn from "the 
children of this world" is the necessity today of group cooperation 
and team work. Because of our love for individual freedom, too often 
Baptists tend to become individualists, even sometimes to the point 
of isolationism. More and more the preservation of individual freedom 
depends upon collective action with all others who love freedom. Both 
great political parties in America today approve the partial surrender 
of our national sovereignty to a United Nations organization, since 
our freedom depends upon making the world free. As individual 
Christians we must frequently subordinate our personal opinions to 
the expressed decisions of the local church. Local churches must join 
hands with our larger cooperating denominational groups. Personally, 
your speaker would carry this principle of Christian unity to its logical 
conclusion and say that Southern Baptists should unite in cooperative 
endeavor with other Christians around the world against our common 
enemy. 



LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 23 

A fifth lesson of survival which Baptists should learn from this 
secular world order is that our future depends upon a continuous 
program of education, indoctrination, and training, both within the 
churches and in our Baptist Colleges. Humanity will perhaps never 
remove itself more than a step or so from extinction. Our barns may 
now be bursting with the abundant fall harvest, but unless we preserve 
our seed corn, we may starve the following year. Our forefathers won 
freedom for America, but that freedom can be lost by one generation 
that refuses to pay the price to preserve it. We live today on the 
spiritual reserves of the past generation, and we are creating now, or 
failing to create, the spiritual foundations of the next generation. The 
present leadership in our churches quietly is dropping out. We must 
not forget that our task of indoctrination and education will never be 
finished until the task of winning this world for Christ is accomplished. 

Today, let us rejoice in our achievements, but at the same time 
let us learn from our failures. The importance of this session can be 
determined only by whether we build a nobler future. 

15. Moderator Campbell appointed the following committees: 
Committee on Resolutions: 

G. Van Stephens, Chairman, Miss Lillian Draughon and 
Mrs. N. W. Maness. 

Committee on Time, Place and Preacher: 
O. W. Pulley, Chairman, Mrs. H. M. O'Quinn and Mrs. 
John Morgan. 

16. Brother Julian Pentecost, from the Baptist Hospital, was 
recognized and upon motion duly made and seconded was per- 
mitted to give his remarks on the work of the Baptist Hospital out 
of order. Brother Pentecost brought greetings from the hospital 
and gave a brief and interesting summary of the work of the 
hospital during the past year. 

17. Dr. Henry A. Walden gave an interesting and informative 
address on the Baptist Mission Program. He used portions of 
scripture from Matthew 28 as the basis for his remarks and point- 
ed out with emphasis the need for increased efforts in our 
Mission Program. 

18. Rev. Ernest P. Russell, Pastor the Dunn First Baptist 
Church, preached the Annual Sermon. Brother Russell delivered 
an inspiring message, following which the session adjourned for 
the lunch hour and enjoyed a bountiful meal prepared by the 
Buie's Creek, Oak Grove and Pleasant Memory Churches and 
served on the grounds of the host church. 



24 LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



AFTERNOON SESSION 

19. The Association reconvened for the Afternoon Session 
at 1:45 with the singing of "Blessed Assurance." 

20. The Moderator presented Rev. J. L. Atkins, Pastor of the 
Piney Grove Church, who gave some excellent remarks on "How 
Churches Can Win The Lost." 

21. The Report on Relief and Annuity was presented by Dr. 
C. D. Bain. His report as unanimously adopted reads as follows: 

RELIEF AND ANNUITY 

The co-operative effort of Southern Baptists in trying to provide 
a measure of security for its pastors and their wives and other denomi- 
national workers is vested in the Relief and Annuity Board located at 
Dallas, Texas. The purpose is: (1) to provide annuities for ministers 
and church employees, who participate in the plans, when they reach 
retirement age, sixty-five; (2) to provide a disability annuity if such 
disability occurs at any time prior to age sixty-five; (3) to provide 
an annuity for the widow in the event of the death of the member 
before reaching sixty-five. 

Two forms of benefit are provided: 

1. Ministers' Retirement Plan 

2. The Widows' Supplemental Annuity Plan 

The cost of the Retirement Plan is as follows: the pastor pays 
4% of his salary; his church or churches pay 4% of his salary; the 
Convention adds to that amount. Funds are handled by our own Re- 
lief and Annuity Board and nobody makes a cent of profit out of it; 
and all amounts earn interest. This provides up to $500 a year for 
total disability. It provides age benefits upon retirement and also makes 
provision for the minister's widow. 

The Widows' Supplemental Annuity Plan is entirely in addition 
to the Ministers' Retirement Plan and is available only to members 
of the Ministers' Retirement Plan. These two plans taken together 
provide a very fine coverage for a man in case of disability before 
he reaches retirement age; and also benefits for his wife in case of 
his death before reaching retirement age; and benefits for both him- 
self and his widow after age sixty-five. On the whole, a man will 
receive in proportion to what he and his churches have paid into 
the plan. 

The plan was open to all North Carolina pastors in 1940. 
Those who were in the state at that time could, and perhaps should, 
have joined the plan. If they did and have been making payments all 



LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 25 

along and continue to do so, they will receive full benefits. Delayed 
joining, of course, means reduced benefits. Pastors now in active 
service who refuse or neglect to join the Ministers' Retirement Plan 
have no right to expect assistance from the relief department. 

There is growing concern on the part of the Relief and An- 
nuity Board over the ever increasing load which the relief depart- 
ment is called upon to carry. For instance, last year North Carolina 
Baptists gave $16,918.93 for ministerial relief but the Relief and 
Annuity Board spent for relief in North Carolina $23,029.50, leav- 
ing a deficit in the North Carolina relief account of $6,110.57. The 
Southern Baptist Convention requests that each church take a fellow- 
ship offering in June to help supplement the worthy cause of minis- 
terial relief. 

Ministers in North Carolina 1,989 

Certificates Issued in Ministers' Relief Plan ..- - 952 

There are Pastors in the Little River Association, who are mem- 
bers of the Plan. This shows that all of the other pastors in this Asso- 
ciation should join the two plans without delay, and several hun- 
dred in North Carolina should also join. 

We suggest that pastors, deacons, members of the finance com- 
mittees, and wives of ministers seek further information from Secre- 
tary M. A. Huggins about these plans. We urge every church in the 
Association to take the lead in helping the pastor to provide in a 
measure for the proverbial "rainy day." 

Respectively submitted, 
C. D. Bain 

22. Brother J. M. Hayes, Superintendent of the North Caro- 
lina Baptist Home at Winston-Salem was recognized and gave 
the following report: 

REPORT ON NORTH CAROLINA BAPTIST HOMES 
FOR AGING 

The North Carolina Baptist State Convention in its November, 
1950, session authorized the committee on the Home for the Aging 
to make plans for the opening and operation of our Home for the 
Aging as soon as the committee might find a way to meet the cost 
of equipping and operating. Because of the drive to raise money for 
the construction of the new wing to the Baptist Hospital, the Con- 
vention instructed the committee for the Home not to expect direct 
help from the Baptist State Convention during the year 1951. 

On January 9, the committee on the Home elected Rev. James 
M. Hayes, pastor of North Winston Baptist Church, Winston-Salem, 



26 LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



superintendent of the Heme, and Miss Edna Heinzerling, director of 
Nurses of the Baptist Hospital, to serve as supervisor of our Home. 
The committee decided to open the Home for residents when sufficient 
funds became available to begin. 

There are many evidences of the Lord's favor upon the Home thus 
far. In the first place. He led in m.aking a home immediately avail- 
able. Ten years ago the trustees of the Bowman Gray School of Medi- 
cine of Wake Forest College leased a three-story, brick-constructed, 
fireproof building, with an elevator, for a period of 25 years for $1.00 
a year. The committee en the Home was able to secure this building 
for 15 years at the same rental price. The building accommodates 
20 residents at present. The top floor, if completed, would give space 
for 16 additional residents. The completion of this floor would cost 
approximately $23,000. With more than 100 applications for admis- 
sion already received, and inquiries coming almost daily, one can 
easily see the pressing need of more space. 

The Homie has been greatly helped by the gifts received — 
furniture, office equipment, heating system, blankets, linens, towels, 
and many other items, as well as discounts on supplies necessary 
to be purchased. Although the Home has been operating only since 
March 16, yet it now has assets approximating $75,000, and is not 
operating in the red. 

Our residents range in age from 67 to 91 years, and come from 
widely scattered sections of North Carolina — from Franklin to Eliza- 
beth City — the mountains to the sea. Regardless of the sections from 
which they come, they are a happy, congenial family, ail rejoicing in 
the opportunity to live in the Home. The attitude of all the residents 
is well expressed in the brief statements of Miss Bertha Callaway, 
former m.atron of Mills Home Orphanage: "I like this good Christian 
home"; and of Mrs. Carroll: "I wouldn't exchange it for any other." 

The Home offers four things to those who come to live there: 
security, comfort, congeniality, and a Christian ministry. With this 
sort of program. North Carolina Baptists can add years to life and 
life to years for those who reside in our Baptist Home for the Aging. 

One donor said when he sent his check to the Home: "I believe 
in this practical kind of Christianity. North Carolma Baptists have 
waited too long to begin it." Surely it is practical, for Jesus said: 
"Inasmuch as ye have dene it unto one of fhe least of these my 
brethren, ye have done it unto me." 

The committee on the Home has challenged North Carolina Bap- 
tists to build a home adequate to meet the need of the increasing 
number of old people from 65 years up. Their program calls for a 
million dollar plant, which would accommodate 270 residents. With 



LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIAT ION 27 

the Lord leading and North Carolina Baptists cooperating, such a 
plant should be built and in operation within a fevv? years. 

"Now also when I am old and grayheaded, O God, forsake me 
not" (Psalm 71:18). 

23. Dr. A. W. Peede dcii\'cred the report on the Baptist 
Hospital. His re})ort was unanimously adopted and reads as 
follows: 

REPORT ON BAPTIST HOSPITAL 

For twenty-eight years our Baptist Hospital has sought to pro- 
vide a Christian ministry of healing. The highest good of the in- 
dividual who is sick has been at the heart of the motive and effort 
of this work. Thousands of sick persons have been blessed by it. 
Without it, many of these could not have received the care they 
needed. 

Last year 9,700 patients were cared for in our Baptist Hospital at 
Winston-Salem, and 95,000 visits were made to the clinics for exami- 
nations and treatments. About half of these were persons with little 
or no money. They were provided free professional care by our 
doctors, and were given additional financial assistance with the cost 
of the service they received. 

This free service was made possible by our Mothers Day offer- 
ings which amounted to $140,000. Other assistance came from various 
health and welfare agencies, the Duke Endowment, and individual 
gifts. All this added together enabled the Hospital to spend $337,000 
in free service. When the free services of the doctors are added to 
this, it means that our hospital provided three-quarters of a million 
dollars in free services. In other words, everytime we gave one dollar 
in our Mother's Day offerings, it enabled our hospital to give five 
dollars in free services to sick persons who are poor in this world's 
goods. 

Our hospital has a medical school, school of nursing, school of 
X-Ray Technology, school for Nurse Anesthetists, School of Labora- 
tory Technology, and a Department of Religion, with a director, tvv^o 
chaplains and a student secretary. The hospital is the property of 
North Carolina Baptists and is the concrete expression of their de- 
sire to minister to the whole person. A special plan of ministering to 
ministers and missionaries through the out-patient department has 
proven a great blessing to those who devote their full time to King- 
dom work. Both the outpatient department and the Private Diagnostic 
Clinic have ministered to hundreds from all walks of life during the 
year who did not have to be hospitalized. 



28 LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 

The new hospital wing has been started. When the building is 
complete many more patients can be provided for more adequately. 
North Carolina Baptists are furnishing the funds with which to build 
the new wing. 

The following is a report of our part in the Little River Asso- 
ciation for the Mother's Day offering and the New Wing. 

CHURCH MOTHERS DAY OFF. NEW WING 

Angier $ 70.69 $ 311.00* 

Antioch 47.45 231.25 

Baptist Chapel 25.00 13.50 

Baptist Grove 21.75 53.18* 

Bethel 15.00 25.00 

Broadway 40.00 . .00 

Buie's Creek 50.00 126.00 

Chalybeate Springs 25.03 10.00 

Coats 76.48 212.98* 

Cumberland Union 20.00 36.00 

Duncan 14.91 21.09 

Dunn, First 182.95 458.60* 

Dunn, Second 13.25 14.00 

Erwin, East . 44.00 27.85 

Erwin, First 140.00 153.35 

Friendship 31.62 226.82 

Harmony 25.00 114.20* 

Holly Springs 88.05 .00 

Kennebec 17.57 25.00 

Layton's Chapel 26.00 22.25* 

Lillington 191.00 462.45* 

Macedonia 16.30 25.00 

Neill's Creek 40.00 71.36 

Oak Grove 00 95.75* 

Piney Grove 58.83 

Pleasant Memory 4.00 27.00 

Rawls 38.52 37.47 

Swann's Station 44.30 10.33 

Totals $1,367.70 $2,811.76 

* These churches have reached their goals. 

Respectively submitted, 
A. W. Peede, 
Hospital Representative 

24. The report on Baptist Orphanages was presented by Mrs. 
I. K. Stafford. Following the reading of her report, which is as 
follows, the same was unanimously adopted: 



LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 29 



REPORT ON BAPTIST ORPHANAGES 

"It is immediately recognized and readily admitted that every 
boy and girl should have a home — a home filled with Christian love 
and care where they will have the food, shelter, and clothing and the 
sound training necessary to carry them to adult life as strong, well 
disciplined citizens. 

Most children have such a home in natural circumstances. But as 
long as there is sin in the world, there will be many boys and girls 
whose homes have been broken." 

These words are quoted from a recent article in a publication of 
the Methodist Home of Texas, but they express why we, as North 
Carolina Baptists, are concerned about our orphanage program. We 
desire that North Carolina boys and girls whose homes are broken 
by sin and tragedy should have the best training possible. Thru our 
Mills Home and Kennedy Home this is given year by year, and we 
have been doing a good job. 

Increasing demands make it imperative that we continue what 
we have begun and that we enlarge. This year has seen plans made 
and begun to improve the facilities at Mills Home thru the erection 
of a new infirmary, print shop and church. These were made possible 
thru the gifts of the Idol family. Improvements in the cottages both 
at Mills Home and Kennedy Home have taken place. The Mills Home 
children have been included in the public school system of Thomas- 
ville and our leaders think this is a step forward. 

Our plan for supporting this important part of our work is by 
monthly offerings in our churches and the Thanksgiving offering. In 
our Association there are several churches which do not give month- 
ly to this cause. We urge that they begin to do so. 

We urge that we pray for the superintendents; Mr. W. C. Reid of 
Mills Home and Mr. W. A. Smith of Kennedy Home; the pastors of 
both Homes and their fine co-workers. 

Respectively submitted, 

Mrs. I. K. Stafford 

25. Brother W. A. Smith, Superintendent of the Kennedy 
Home was recognized for some brief remarks on our responsi- 
bility to orphans. Rev. G. Scott Turner gave the report on Evange- 
lisrn which was unanimously adopted. His report reads as follows: 

REPORT ON EVANGELISM 

During this year of 1951 Southern Baptists engaged in the great- 
est evangelistic effort in our history — the simultaneous campaign. It 
would seem that if our people ever co-operate fully in any movement 



So LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



it would be in evangelism. Your Associational Missionary, chairman of 
evangelism and several of the pastors of the Association made a major 
effort to enlist all the churches in this movement. There was some 
measure of co-operation in almost all of our churches though some 
were not excessively enthusiastic. We found it very difficult to get 
reports from some churches and perhaps the most accurate measure 
we have of the success of the campaign is found in the reports of the 
churches to this meeting 459 additions by baptism, 289 by letter or 
restoration, which is 100 more than our best year in the records I 
have. If one hundred souls were saved and brought to eternal life 
how glorious a return was that for our small efforts. 

Many churches took a census of their community and the mem- 
bership was challenged by the results to greater efforts to win their 
own communities to Christ. If the information gathered in a religious 
census is made use of it can be one of our most effective endeavors 

Your committee feels that a simultaneous campaign of evangelism 
is very much worthwhile but that there are such varying conditions 
in the different communities that it is not the best method for every 
year. We do urge each church to have one or two evangelistic meet- 
ings each year and to be earnest and persistent in our evangelistic ef- 
forts all the year. Let us be equally diligent to give careful training 
and instruction to those added to our church. We often reap a scant 
harvest by failure in this important duty. 

Respectively submitted, 

G. Scott Turner 

26. Associational Missionary Moore gave his report which was 
adopted. His report reads as follows: 

ASSOCIATIONAL MISSIONARY REPORT 
TO LITTLE RIVER ASSOCIATION 

The mission of the church is missions. The church is to make 
disciples for Jesus at home and abroad. In order that the task be 
accomplished, it is needful to have churches in each community that 
are concerned about the needs in the local community and of the 
whole world. The first responsibility of a local church is the local 
community. The next area of responsibility is the adjoining territory 
or in most cases the county; then the state, the homeland and other 
lands. As Baptist People, we are interested in world missions. Too 
many churches limit their mission interests to a long-range co-operative 
effort to the neglect of the field close at home. To be interested in 
local mission work will create a vital interest in all other phases 
of organized mission effort. To strengthen the churches of our asso- 
ciation and to create within them a greater interest in world missions 
is an important task. 



LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 31 



The work of the local or Associational Missionary consists of both 
mission and promotional work. He is to work in cooperation with and 
under the direction of the missions committee of the Association. 
This committee and the missionary are to try to carry out the wishes 
of the Association. The work of associational missionary is not a new 
thing. The oldest Baptist Association in America — the Philadelphia, 
organized in 1707 employed a missionary to work in its own area 21 
years before British Baptists sent out Carey. Early in the history of 
the Charleston Association (organized 1751) two missionaries were 
employed. 

In recent years, the number of associations employing missionaries 
has increased rapidly. At present, some 54 of the 71 associations in 
North Carolina have missionaries. In 1942 there were 4. What do these 
missionaries do? It depends largely upon the nature of the need in 
the association. All are concerned about promoting mission activity 
in the area of the association, encouraging the churches to participate 
in the program of the State or Southern Convention, and assisting any 
given church in its work according to the specific need. Activities of 
the missionaries generally fall under four divisions: 

1. General promotional work. This is done generally through: 

(a) Establishing and maintaining educational organizations of the 
association such as the Assn'l S. S., B. T. U., W. M. U. and Brotherhood. 

(b) By promoting cooperative efforts among the churches as 
schools for preachers and deacons, stewardship campaigns, evangelistic 
campaigns, and clinics for training workers. 

(c) By preparing and distributing a monthly associational bulletin. 

2. Activities in local churches: 

(a) Study courses for various organizations, stewardship revivals, 
assistance with church budgets, encouraging reading of denominational 
papers, helping locate pastors, and assisting the churches in any way 
according to specific needs. This work is especially important in pas- 
torless churches or in churches with non-resident or student pastors. 

3. Work in unchurched areas and institutions by making surveys 
of fields of service to discover opportunities, by assisting in establish- 
ing missions under sponsorship of some church, and conducting Vaca- 
tion Bible Schools or revivals in unchurched areas. 

4. General activities such as personal soul-winning, distributing 
tracts and other literature, and enlisting others in Christian service. 

The Associational Missionary is a servant of the churches, seek- 
ing to harness and coordinate their energies and resources for the ex- 
tension of the Kingdom in the association, and encouraging indepen- 
dent, autonomous churches to better cooperate in winning the world 
to Christ. 



32 LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 

Following is a list of some of the activities of the Little River 
Missionary during the past year: 

Sermons preached in regular or special services on Sundays 35 

Sunday School study courses taught ... 3 

Baptist Training Union Study Courses taught 2 

Mission and other courses taught 3 

Taught Stewardship course in Divisional Camp, Caswell 1 

Associational meetings attended 16 

Spoke on Cooperative Program ._ 7 

Illustrated lectures given 7 

Other speeches in churches 18 

Regional meetings attended (Including Rural Ch. Dev. meetings) 9 

State-wide meetings attended 8 

Performed wedding ceremony 1 

Conducted and tabulated census 1 

Preached in three weeks of revival in association 

Worked in six Vacation Bible Schools. 

Conducted radio devotions two weeks. 

Published a bulletin monthly — 250 copies per month. 

Attended one Rural Life Conference in Louisville, Ky. 

Attended numerous committee meetings. 

Traveled 15,000 miles in doing the work. (Does not include the Ky. trip) 

Much of the work of the missionary consisted of personal contacts 
during the week with various individuals in the churches, correspond- 
ence concerning activities, and other individual conferences of which 
no accurate records are kept. Also, the various activities on the deno- 
minational calendar were presented by personal contact, by corre- 
spondence and through the Associational bulletin — The Little River 
Baptist News. 

The Calendar of Activities for the Association is generally made 
to run with the calendar year. By the first of January, State and South- 
wide calendars are available and the Associational Calendar can be 
made to correspond with them. 

The following is a list of some objectives that your missionary 
would like to see adopted for the year 1952. 

1. Continue the work of Associational Missions with a Missionary 
employed for full time work. 

2. Enlist a full corps of Associational Officers for each of the follow- 
ing departments: S. S., B. T. U., W. M. U., and Brotherhood. 

3. Have a 5-day Pastor-Deacon School. (Perhaps in the Spring-group 
schools) 

4. Have a 5-day S. S. teacher training course — (central, group, or 
simultaneous) 

5. Have an Association-wide V. B S. Clinic. 



LITTLE RIVER J^APTIST ASSOCIATION 3S 

6. Plan for a School of Missions. (Perhaps for the fall) 

7. Organize an Associational Choir. 

8. Work out early in the year a correlated Calendar of Activities 
for all the organizations. 

The following is a list of things with which your missionary could 
help in 1952, upon invitation of the church: 

1. Assist in Sunday School Revivals in local churches. 

2. Assist in Baptist Training Union and W. M. U. study courses in 
the local churches. 

3. Assist with survey and enlargement campaigns in local churches 
and assist with organization of new units in any department. 

4. Make surveys of needy mission fields and help organize new 
churches. 

5. Assist with setting up a good church budget in local churches. 

6. Stimulate desire for better, more adequate, and more beautiful 
church buildings. 

7. Present ministries of the Cooperative Program. 

8. Give illustrated lectures (using projector with slides or film- 
strip) on various phases of denominational work. 

Respectively submitted, 
R. E. Moore, 
Associational Missionary 

27. Rev. Arthur Stainback, Pastor of Stoney Creek Church 
in the Roanoke Association was presented by the Moderator and 
gave a most interesting and inspiring address on "The Challenge 
of Our Rural Work." 

28. Mr. Berles C. Johnson gave the report of the Budget 
Committee, which was adopted and reads as follows: 

REPORT OF BUDGET COMMITTEE 

We recommend the following budget for the Little River Asso- 
ciation for the year 1951-52. 
Missionary: 

Salary of missionary ....._ $2,700.00 

Travel expense 900.00 

Housing ^ 600.00 

Retirement 96.00 

Printing and supplies 50.00 

General: 

Expenses of Assoc. Officers $ 150.00 

Printing, distributing minutes 220.00 

Clerk 35.00 



$4,751.00 



34 LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



We recommend that the churches be requested to give 3 per cent 
of their budget exclusive of the building fund, for Associational Mis- 
sions and that they send a suitable amount with their letter to the 
annual meeting for the expenses connected with the minutes. 

Respectively submitted, 

G. S. Turner 

J. Ben Eller 

Berles Johnson 

29. Associational Missionary Moore rendered the report of 
the Nominating Committee, which report was adopted by unani- 
mous vote. The adoption of said report resulted in the election 
of the several officers listed in the Directory of these minutes. 

30. The Committee on Time, Place and Preacher was recog- 
nized for its report. The report as presented reads as follows: 

Preacher Rev. L. M. Woolweaver, Pastor 

of Antioch Baptist Church 

Alternate _ Rev. T. W. Williams, Pastor 

of Lillington Baptist Church 

Place Lillington Baptist Church 

Time.... .......October 28, 1952 

31. The report of the Resolutions Committee was present- 
ed and adopted by unanimous vote. The report of this commit- 
tee reads as follows: 

REPORT OF THE RESOLUTIONS COMMITTEE 

The Little River Baptist Association in its 76th annual session, 
meeting with the Buie's Creek Church, on the 30th day of October, 
1951, with gratitude to Almighty God for His manifold blessings, and 
for the privilege of being "workers together with Him" in the in- 
coming, and the ongoing of His Glorious Kingdom, desire to express 
at this time: 

1. Our thanks to each of the 28 churches of the Little River 
Association represented: 

2. To the Buie's Creek, Oak Grove, and Pleasant Memory Churches 
for their gracious hospitality, and for their adequate provision for our 
every need; 

3. To the program committee: L. H. Campbell, G. S. Turner, and 
R. E. Moore for such an interesting and helpful program; 

4. To each one on the program for the good reports, the splendid 
messages, including the inspiring sermon by Rev. E. P. Russell, and 
for the music by Rev. T. W. Wilhams, Mrs. A. E. Lynch, Mrs. J. W. 
Angell and the Campbell College quartet. 



LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 35 

5. To Moderator L. H. Campbell for the very capable manner in 
which he presided over the association; 

6. To Rev. R. E. Moore for his faithful work as Associational Mis- 
sionary, to Brother W. A. Johnson for his splendid work as clerk, to 
Brother J. C. Bullock for his efficient work as treasurer, and to Rev. 
G. Scott Turner for his work as Superintendent of Evangelism during 
the evangelistic crusade. 

7. To the Executive Committee for the recent manner in which 
they have gone about their work, including the suggested changes to 
the constitution of the Association; 

We suggest (1) That any such future changes be sent to the 
churches, at least one month before the annual meeting of the Asso- 
ciation; and (2) That the Executive Committee give due consideration 
to the idea of having another day of the Association sometime in the 
spring. 

Respectfully submitted, 

G. Van Stephens 

Miss Lillian Draughon 

Mrs. N. W. Maness, Committee 

32. Brother J. Ben Eller moved that the Association go on 
record as opposing the sending of an Ambassador to the Vatican 
and that the Resolution Committee prepare and furnish the 
United States Senators from North Carolina and to the Congress- 
man from the Seventh Congressional District copies of an ap- 
propriate resolution to sach effect. This motion was duly second- 
ed and unanimously adopted. 

33. Upon motion of Arsociational Missionary Moore, duly 
seconded, B. P. Marshbanks, Sr. w^as duly elected as the Little 
River Baptist Association R,epresentative on the Board of the 
North Carolina Baptist Home. 

34. Upon motion of Rev. G. Scott Turner, duly seconded, 
the Clerk was authorized to edit all reports given at this meet- 
ing to the extent he deemed necessary before having the minutes 
printed. 

35. At the suggestion of Moderator Campbell, upon motion 
duly made and seconded it was ordered that the As-ociation send 
greetings to Dr. A. Paul Bagby who was ill and unable to at- 
tend the meeting. 

36. Upon motion duly made and seconded, the Association 
adjourned to reconvene at 7:30 for the evening session. 

37. During the period of adjournment the host churches pro- 
vided an excellent meal on the grounds of the Buic's Creek 
Church. 



36 LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



EVENING SESSION 

38. The Evening Session convened at 7:30 with the singing 
of "My Hope Is Built On Nothing Less." The opening worship 
was led by Rev. L. M. Woolweaver, following which Mrs. J. W. 
Angell rendered two violin selections. Her accompanying Pianist 
was Mrs. A. E. Lynch. 

39. The report of the Women's Missionary Union was pre- 
sented by Mrs. D. B. Andrews and adopted in the following 
form: 

ANNUAL REPORT WOMAN'S MISSIONARY UNION 
LITTLE RIVER ASSOCIATION 

Woman's Missionary Union has made some important changes 
during 1951. When our women met in annual session in Charlotte 
last March, keeping step with Southern Union, we voted to change 
our year. That is to say, instead of running from January to January 
as we have done previously, we shall now close our books on Septem- 
ber 30, as does this association. Thus it was necesary that we have 
a "nine months year." This is most advantageous in making a re- 
port to this meeting. 

Happy indeed am I to report that the Little River Associational 
Woman's Missionary Union is A-1 for the year just completed. It was 
with gratitude to God and to our faithful women that I noted that 
all 13 points on the Standard for Associations had been reached. 
It is the first time in the history of our work that more than 1000 
women are serving through our Missionary Societies. Almost 1000 
Young People are enrolled in our Young People's organizations. 

Those societies reaching all points on the Standard of Excellence 
are: Chalybeate Springs, Coats, Harmony, and Neil's Creek. Also 
A-1 were Neil's Creek Y. W. A., Chalybeate Jr. G. A., Lillington Jr. 
G. A., Chalybeate Sunbeams, and Lillington's 2 Sunbeam Bands. 

Our most notable gains have been made in our gifts through 
our Special Offerings. 

Let us, as we begin our new year, ask forgiveness for all we have 
left undone, seek divine strength and guidance as we endeavor to 
lead a lost world to "Behold the Lamb of God which taketh away the 
sin of the world." 

"Let every kindred, every tribe 

On this terrestrial ball 

To Him, all majesty ascribe 

And crown Him Lord of all." 

Respectively submitted, 
Mrs. D. B. Andrews 



LITTLE RIVER BAPT IST AS SOCIATION _37 

40. Julius Holloway presented the Sunday School report. 
His report as presented and adopted reads as follows: 

THE ASSOCIATIONAL SUNDAY SCHOOL REPORT 

The associational Sunday School organization has held general 
conferences and officers meetings during the year. We offered a 
team of workers to each Sunday School to help present the Sunday 
School work for the year. An Associational Bible School clinic was 
held to help our workers do a better job. An associational planning 
meeting was held at Lillington with better attendance than usual. 
The aims for the past year were: "More people," "More Bible study," 
and "More trained workers." Our Sunday School attendance last year 
was 3,620 this year 3,948 a gain of 328. The enrollment last year, 
6,714, this year 7,168 gain of 454. 

The main objectives for the new year are: 

(1) An increased enrollment with special attention being given 
to Intermediates, Young People, and Adults. We are urging that new 
classes be started in these groups if at all possible. 

(2) An expanding Bible-Teaching program including: 

1. An enriiched Sunday morning session of one hour and fifteen 
minutes each Sunday. 

2. A Vacation Bible School for two weeks. Most of our churches 
have Bible Schools for one week. Please try to have two weeks this 
year. 

3. January Bible Study Week. Many of our churches are beginn- 
ing to enjoy this more than any week of the year. This year we are 
going to study, January 7-11, Dr. J. Clyde Turner's book, "The New 
Testament Doctrine of The Church." Dr. Duke K. McCall says: "All 
Baptist beliefs Must be based on the Bible. Today our denomination 
faces a challenge to its unified life both from within and without in 
terms of our beliefs about the church. It is appropriate and imperative 
therefore that Southern Baptists should use Dr. Turner's book as a 
guide to finding what the Bible teaches." We must have the support 
of the Pastors and Deacons to get our entire church above the pri- 
mary department into this week of study. 

4. Use Bible books in Sunday School training course. We are sug- 
gesting that each church have a training course for its Sunday School 
workers. You would not think of hiring a teacher to teach in the 
public schools without some training. Yet we hand a quarterly to 
some person who has had no training and say to him or her guide 
the life of my child. Please offer your teachers a chance to train 
for the greatest of all business on earth. We have just completed 
some group training schools for our workers. We hope we can make 
this a yearly occasion. 



38 LITTLE RIVER BAPllST ASSOCIATION 

5. Work for daily Family Bible study. If this were done it would 
remake many of our homes. Homes are the backbone of our nation. 
If they are weak our nation will be weak. If they are godly they will 
have a righteous influence on our nation. 

(3) All of our Sunday School efforts centered in winning 
people to Christ. "Not every one that sayeth Lord, Lord shall 
enter the Kingdom of God but He that doeth the will of the Father." 
Jesus said about a certain woman who came to anoint His body for 
burial, "She hath done what she could." Will you do all you can to 
win the lost to Christ this year? 

Respectively submitted, 

Julius Holloway 

41. The B. 1. U. report was presented by Brother Bennie 
Slaugluer and was nnaniniously adopted. His report reads as 
follows: 

THE TRAINING UNION REPORT 

With the exception of the director we had a capable set of 
leaders in our Associational B. T. U. for this year, and would perhaps 
have had, under the right man, a glowing report of accomplishment in 
co-operatively developing an ever enlarging group of people with 
service as their goal and training as a means to that end. I don't 
mean this as an apology — for had I been twins I could have let the 
other do what I never seem to find time for, or energy or interest in 
and information for doing a job like underneath we feel should be 
done. Neither is it a boast that under different circumstances, I could 
now say what I'd like to say and what you'd like to hear. It is said 
simply hoping we can spread our work and responsibility to enough 
people so that all are busy and growing, but none tired and confused 
or inadequate to keep us on the march of growth. 

I wish our new director Godspeed and that with the new leaders 
they may inspire all our churches to develop green (growing) pro- 
grams of training for kingdom service. I hope too that he will not 
be loaded with too much "other" work to prevent him giving ample 
time and effort to this important phase of our work. Such practices 
keep latent talent latent in others. My resignation therefore wasn't 
"reluctantly" but determined beforehand and should perhaps have 
been given at the last meeting of our group. 

To report on what has been done will be inaccurate to say the 
least. Only a few of our churches have reported to us of the facts 
we need to make an accurate picture of how it all shapes up. Of five 
churches reporting, three have a complete organization from Story 
Hour to Adult Unions, and two having all but the Story Hour Union. 



LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 39 

One of the five shows much evidence of growth — enrollment jumped 
from 196 to 216 in 3 months necessitating a new union making 13 in 
a country church (Antioch). 

The reporting churches are all what we'd call not city churches, 
but have a total of 501 enrolled for training program. If this could 
be construed as average, then we could presume our Association 
could boast 2800 trainees. Such a report would sound good — it would 
be good! Maybe your church is like mine was — small, under manned 
and needful of what our associational organization should be con- 
cerned with most of all: namely, to actively promote by inspiration 
and perspiration in organizing and training of leadership to take 
over. 

But maybe you request help and get none and become discouraged 
or else look elsewhere and do it anyhow — if you can't get what you 
want get something better — I don't have to suggest a means if you 
really want a training program. You'll find one! Our church did — 
God helped us. 

We made effort in mass meetings to carry on the work of hymn 
singing, better speakers, sword-drilling and memory work and here 
again was evidence of this work going on in some churches, others 
if so — we didn't know it. Our groups going to Raleigh in Regional 
activity did well. Not enough churches were represented but we would 
have had to have longer sessions if they had been. But every one 
attending these meetings knew that the work behind the training of 
these youngsters of ours was well worth the accomplishment we wit- 
nessed, and these youngsters themselves will be forever grateful for 
whatever and however much you expend in their behalf. 

I am glad to note finally that adults also have at last begun to 
learn that study and training should never cease, nor be interrupted. 
For growth, not goodness, is the measuring stick of the vitality of 
our faith. No standard of goodness or attainment should ever capture 
our fancy, or bind us as fact. 

We invite, not challenge, you to consider the boundless possibili- 
ties of growth in Christian life and service even to the determination 
that a training program in your church shall be; and that as a group 
our power will be in our unity of purpose and working for the same 
goal of stronger and yet stronger workers in Christ's Kingdom. Back 
up and utilize your B. T. U. 

Respectfully submitted, 

B. O. Slaughter 

42. Mrs. W. E. Nichols was recognized and delivered the re- 
port on the American Bible Society. Her report as adopted, reads 
as follows: 



40 LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



REPORT ON AMERICAN BIBLE SOCIETY 

As we have listened to the challenging messages of the mission- 
aries in recent months our minds have been made to be aware of 
the one sentence, "Wake up America." Yes, wake up to God's won- 
der Book. 

The Bible light for our understanding is secure in its guidance. 
For in reality its word is a lamp unto our feet and a light unto our 
paths. 

Our field today is the world, and the seed is the word of God. 
The American Bible society working with Southern Baptists mission 
agencies in their advance for world wide missions joins in reporting 
that advance has begun. The Society also joins in urging that this 
missionary advance must continue and increase. Experience on mis- 
sion fields around the world shows that in every missionary advance 
the Bible goes forward first. 

The Bible Is a "Must" In Mission Work 

If the people of the world are to know Christ, they must have 
the Bible. It is the one primary source of knowledge of Him. The 
Bible is the missionary's chief tool. The Bible itself is a missionary. 
It can go where the human missionary cannot go, stay when he 
must leave, and keep on working in a man's heart. 
^ Every man must have the Bible in his own native tongue if the 
Word of God is to speak to his heart. Someone must translate it into 
his language, publish it and send it to him, wherever he may live. 

The American Bible Society, a missionary non-profit organization, 
supported by gifts, serves as that "Someone." It aids in Bible trans- 
lation, publishes the Scriptures without note or comment, and dis- 
tributes them, without profit and usually below cost, for use in 
mission work around the world. 

During 1950 the American Bible Society — 

— distributed through its own work, at home and abroad, more 
than 11 million volumes of Scriptures. Another 3 million volumes were 
produced through gifts of materials and money to Bible Societies of 
other countries, especially Germany and Japan, bringing the grand total 
to more than 14 million volumes for the year; 

— supplied Testaments in 9 different languages for United Nations 
forces in Korea; 

— started printing 2 million service Testaments for our own ex- 
panding armed forces; 

— in Japan, distributed 3 million volumes, which was the goal 
for 1950, making the total distribution in Japan since World War II, 
more than 6 million volumes. 



LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 41 

1951 Opportunities Call For Even Greater Advance In Scripture 
Distribution 

Japan is the major challenge for greater Advance. It is not just 
an "open door"; "the whole side of the house has fallen out" and 
we are free to walk right in. Other fields also present needs which, 
though not so dramatic, are just as real. 

In 1950, Southern Baptist Churches gave $78,643 to the American 
Bible Society; gifts from churches of all denominations amounted to 
$646,756. In view of Southern Baptists' strength and readiness to 
respond to missionary needs, it is expected that Southern Baptist 
churches will soon be giving to the American Bible Society at least 
$150,000 each year. 

The Bible is a companion book for the journey of the day, for 
the rest of the night, for the blessing of the morning. When thou goest 
it shall lead thee, when thou sleepest it shall keep thee, and when thou 
wakest, it shall talk with thee. 

In our efforts to sow the good seed, let's think not only of our 
foreign neighbors but think of our own Bibleless America. There are 
Bibleless Americans within the sound of every church bell. They live 
on some of our main streets. They harvest our crops. They live in 
hogans of the desert. They scratch a living from the thin top soil 
of our mountain sides. They huddle together in our cities. They are 
Americans — But they are Bibleless. 

The American Bible Society has in faith adopted the largest 
budget it has ever tried to raise. So far the response has been en- 
couraging. The goals can be reached if our Christian people make 
sacrificial gifts and will see that his church according to the methods 
prevailing in his denomination does its share for seeing that more 
widely than ever in today's distraught world the man with the Book — 
meets the man without the Book and persuades him that herein "is the 
lamp unto his feet and a light unto his path." 

This Book unfolds Jehovah's mind. 

This Voice salutes in accents kind. 

This friend will all you need supply 

This fountain sends forth streams of joy, 

This mine affords us boundless wealth, 

This good physician gives us Health. 

This Sun renews and warms the Soul, 

This sword both wounds and makes us whole. 

This letter shows our sins forgiven. 

This guide conducts us safe to Heaven. 

This charter has been sealed with blood. 

This volume is the Word of God. 

Respectfully submitted, 
Mrs. W. E. Nichols 



42 LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 

43. Upon motion of Rev. Russell, duly seconded, the 1951 
Minutes were ordered dedicated to Dr. A. Paul Bagby. 

44. Mrs. J. Ben Eller, Berles Johnson and Rev. Forrest Max- 
well participated in an interesting panel discussion on "Coopera- 
tive Efforts in Financing our Program." 

45. Rev. A. C. McCall delivered the Social Service report. 
His report as presented and adopted reads as follows: 

SOCIAL SERVICE REPORT 

I guess that no one acquainted with Goethe would think he was 
too much concerned with religion. Yet it was Goethe, that said, Re- 
ligion was made to help folks to bear the unbearable, and do the im- 
possible. 

As I have thought and read through the years, I have come to 
the conclusion, that the primary purpose of religion is to know God. 

The New Testament according to my understanding interprets this 
knowledge of God in two directions, 1st, The making of people dif- 
ferent, Expressed in the song, "The Light of The World Is Jesus", "Once 
I Was Blind But Now I Can See." Somewhere the Romans said know- 
ledge is power, This power is first a personal matter, 2nd, This chang- 
ed individual is to bless and change society, making the kingdoms 
of this world into or at least towards the Kingdom of God, "Ye Are 
The Light of The World." A city that is set on a hill cannot be hid, 
said Jesus. Now the only difference in the importance of these two 
things, is in its, or their tense. Without the personal knowledge of 
God through his Grace, The individual has no place to stand and no 
message powerful enough to make society over. Ye cannot combat a 
force with a farce. 

If you will take time to observe as you read a lot of the so called 
religious literature of today, you will find that much of it has been 
written around the word ought instead of the word is. It is often 
in the subjunctive mood instead of the indicative mood. Somewhere 
in history some person said I would rather be damned than to be 
saved alone, I doubt that there is any such thing as being saved alone, 
any good psychologist will tell you that there is no "Impression With- 
out Expression." Just remember this, Religion is essentially a Gospel 
not about what ought to be. It is a gospel about what everlastingly is. 

It seems that some people looked out on a bad situation and there 
felt their need of God. Turning to Him dedicated their lives to go any 
where He sent them. Isaiah, is an illustration of this. The prayer of an 
unknown person is another. As this person stood beside the great 
ocean marveled at its mystery he dropped his head closed his eyes 
and prayed thus, "O God Thou Art So Great And I Am So Small." In 
another case Jesus our Lord pointed out that in order to get to God 



LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 43 

in worship, we needed to get right with society, or at least a part of 
it." If You Bring Your Gift to The Altar And There Remember 
That Thy Brother Has Ought Against Thee, Leave There Thy Gift, 
Go Be Reconciled With Thy Brother Then Come Offer Thy Gift, 
Whichever road one may take. An individual experience with God, 
and right dealings with society. Constitutes the New Testament mes- 
sage on religion. 

Some of you may be trying to see some relationship between 
these things I am trying to say and the subject of this report. Well 
in my own thinking, our society, our world, the tragedies we are 
surrounded with are here today because we have failed to see, hear, 
and do these two things. Personally unless some way, some how we 
come to them we will still live in a sick world. 

FIRST THE ALCOHOL EVIL 

It is generally understood and accepted that our number one 
enemy to a better society is beverage alcohol. Through the years the 
different religious denominations, civic organizations, etc. have been 
passing resolutions concerning this great evil. All the time the sale 
of and the drinking of alcohol has increased, and all the religious 
denominations together have not had enough influence, power, or 
whatever it takes to get the legislature to grant an election to see if 
the majority of the people in our state want to be in the alcohol 
business. 

From June 30, 1940, until June 30, 1941, the State of North Caro- 
lina sold $8,519,200.21 worth of alcoholic products, 10 years later the 
sales amounted to $47,417,490.45. This is an increase of about four million 
dollars each year. During these ten years North Carolina revenue 
from these sales was $43,860,168.81. At the present there are 28 
counties and five towns with ABC stores. 

A. The National Safety Council, says that one out of every four 
drivers or pedestrians, in fatal accidents last year had been drinking 

B. The alcohol interests in our nation spend one hundred fifty 
million dollars each year for advertisements. They rationalize this by 
saying that they are not trying to increase drinking, but are only 
trying to get people to drink their brand. 

C. There are more bar maids in this nation of ours than there 
are girls in college. 

D. The F. B. I. in its publication "Unified Crime" Reports, says 
this, arrests for drunken driving increased during last year from 
153.5 per 100,000. to 164.8 per 100,000. 

E. A preacher feels a little hesitant, when he thinks of how much 
less alcoholic beverages would have been sold, if the members of 
his church (both men and women) had been total abstainers which is 
the first Christian Principle in dealing with alcohol. 



44 LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 

SECOND THE CONDITION OF OUR HOMES 

Two things point out the perilous condition of our homes to- 
day. 1st, The continuous increase of divorces. 2nd, The ever growing 
problem of juvenile delinquency. Dr. R. T. Vann (Remembered As 
One of North Carolinas Great Preachers and Teachers) once said to 
me, McCall "That which don't start in the home don't start." 

A. Seventy years ago the ratio between marriages and divorce was 
one to twenty, now the ratio is 2 in 5. It is predicted by wise and 
considerate people, that in the next 10 to 15 years it will be 1 out of 
2. Here the church faces a challenge to do something more than 
shake their heads and say, "To bad, to bad," What a shame. 

B. The latest statistics (That I received) given out by the F. B. I. 
indicates that the 17 year olds represent the largest criminal group. 
Dr. John C. Almack, Professor of Education at Stafford University, 
says that about fifty percent of high school and college students drink, 
and that it is fast becoming a problem of how to deal with the junior 
high school pupils the 13 and 14 year olds concerning drinking. 

C. Back of these two great evils is a cause. Gauss and effect will 
ever be true. There are 15 million sex magazines printed and read 
monthly by a third of our nation. One hundred thousand girls enter 
white slavery every year. The Sunday morning church services are 
attended by only 5 percent of the population of our land, the Sunday 
night services by only 2 percent of them. "Twenty-seven million child- 
ren and young people under 21 years old have no religious training 
at all," I ask are there no voices among us today to uphold the ideals 
of purity, virtue, and decency. This is an hour for action, an hour for 
the proclamation of the ideals and principles of Jesus. 

THIRD THE RACE QUESTION 

To begin with I quote Dr. E. M. Poteat. "The race relation ques- 
tion is not the most pleasant of subjects, while we have hope about 
it, our timidity is collosal. Are we bold? Is it the part of boldness to 
say nothing about segregation, hated and frightened word, is it a 
subject about which we must not talk. If segregation is not un-Ghristian 
we must defend it. If it is un-Christian we must protest against it. 
Measure by both the teaching of Jesus and his example. The 
church in our part of the world has been about the most un-Ghristian 
institution among us. When Jesus was going through Samaria he stop- 
ped at Jacobs well talked with a Samaritan woman. When the Greek 
woman came asking for the crumbs from the masters table he as- 
sociated with her and helped her, complimenting her for her faith. 
Jesus, teachings are numerous concerning prejudices of any kind. 

A. The Southern Baptist Convention in its 1950 session passed 
resolutions recommending that pulpits be exchanged between the 
races, that simultaneous revivals be carried on together. I asked my 



LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 45 

church the other Sunday morning what would they do if I should an- 
nounce that Dr. Benjaman Mays of Atlanta was going to preach in my 
church the next Sunday? I know what most of them woud do. They 
would criticize me all the week and stay at home on Sunday, run me 
off the third Sunday. Well lets hope that the spirit back of said re- 
solution will serve as the (Psychologist would say as a conditioner). 
Bringing about a better feeling between the races. 

B. The fact that the Southern Baptist Seminaries have opened 
their doors to the Negro, that many years ago Union Seminary in 
Richmond did this, that the University of North Carolina has opened 
one of its schools to Negroes also allowing them to sit in the football 
stadium. In last weeks Biblical Recorder you saw the picture of Dr. 
George Kelsey who is returning for his second appearance before 
the B. S. U. I. went to James Ray and told him I appreceiated this. I 
knew that this part of our denomination was interacial. 

C. There are four other things I mention which appeal to me to 
be brotherly to Negroes. I accept Peters Discovery of Simons House 
By The Sea, God Has No Favorites. 1st. The houses where they live, 
I doubt seriously, that a person that lives in a comfortable home, 
with modern conveniences and allows the tenant on his farm to live 
in a shack, is practicing Christian ethics. In a book "These My Bre- 
thren" some facts that ought to stir us wide awake are found. The 
tenant houses average 3 and a fraction rooms. Two-thirds of these 
houses are unpainted. The sanitary conditions around these houses 
is possibly the greatest factor in the fact that the average Negro 
lives 10 years less than the white man that owns the farm. 

D. The place they worship, the Church, Negro Churches are being 
organized just one third as fast as they were 20 years ago. Eighty-eight 
percent of their churches are rural, three of these churches out of 
four have only one room, two out of five need repairing. Half of them 
need painting, three out of five have a roof that leaks. In 86 percent 
of the cases the church, the church lot, has little or no attraction, as 
far as appearance is concerned. 

3rd. Training outlook for future leaders, as well as their pre- 
paration of present leaders. This applies to religious leaders. 

A. There is not a single accredited theological school especially 
for Negroes in our nation. In all the Negro schools in America there is 
only 150 Negroes with the B. D. degree available per year. A survey 
in 12 Negro Colleges shows that there are only 335 undergraduate 
students that say they will enter ministry, and only in comparison 
with other years. Only 100 of these are expected to graduate. 

4th. Their health. The death rate among the Negroes is 60 percent 
higher than among the whites. There are four problems the Negro 
faces concerning improved health. 

A. His Inability To Pay For Adequate Medical Care. 



46 LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 

B. The shortage of Doctors and Nurses in the area where the Ne- 
groes live. Only 105 Negro specialists are located in the South 

C. The discrimination against Negro Doctors and patients. It is 
impossible for a Negro surgeon to keep himself in good standing with 
the American College of Surgery in the South. 

D. Insufficient health education to utilize personnel and health 
facilities advantageously. 

FOURTH SOCIAL RIGHTEOUSNESS 

No report on social service. That thinks at all about Social 
Righteousness will be even near complete without mentioning. 

1st. The widespread of the dope evil of our day. All the way from 
outstanding physicians to neurotics of the lower strategy of humanity 
this evil is taking its toll. 

2nd. The mania for gambling, (literally the desire to get something 
for nothing) slot machines, number racket, dog race gambling (legaliz- 
ed in our state) and many other forms. To mention just one more the 
Society Women (some from my church that play bridge for prizes). 

3rd. The desecration of the Sabbath Day. Picture shows, ball games, 
automobile races, stores wide open. Many of the operators and owners 
of these and other things that make the Sabbath a Holiday instead of 
a Holy Day are members of our churches. I have yet to know intimately 
a person that treats lightly the command to keep the Sabbath day 
Holy, that doesn't grow cold and indifferent towards the spiritual things 
of life. 

Religion has been administered on such a low level for so long. 
Religion has lost its power, its courage, its influence, in our world. 
Rhinold Neiber says that it has been two hundred years since any 
sizeable group of people took Jesus seriously or had any intention 
practicing his teaching. 

Respectfully submitted, 
A. C. McCall, Committee. 

46. The program of the meeting was concluded with an in- 
teresting and challenging address by James M. Hayes, Superinten- 
dent of the North Carolina Baptist Homes for Aging. 

47. Following the address by Brother Hayes, Rev. J. E. Ayscue 
delivered the benediction and the meeting adjourned. 



LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 47 



OUR BELOVED DEAD 

ANGIER— Mrs. A. B. Currin, Sr., Mr. Johnnie Deal, Mr. Lewis Parrish 

ANTIOCH— Mr. W. W. McLean, Mrs. Rebecca Page 

BAPTIST GROVE— Mrs. Maggie Cain 

BROADWAY— Mrs. Matilda Sloan, Mrs. H. M. Thomas, Deacon, Mrs. 
A. Collins, Mr. Sam Kelly 

BUIE'S CREEK— Mrs. Daisy Lee Upchurch Stevens, Mr. L. E. McPhail, 
Mr. J. H. Berghanser, Deacon, Mr. E. M. Cain, Mr Luther Forbes, 
Mr. Ferd D. Jackson 

CHALYBEATE SPRINGS— Mrs. W. F. Sanford, Mrs. J. A. Lyon 

COATS— Mrs. T. D. Stewart, Mrs. M. D. Denning 

DUNN, FIRST— Mr. H. C. Lee, Mr. John A. McKay, Trustee, Mr. L. D. 
Ennis, Mrs. Frank T. Godwin, Mrs. Florence Troville, Mrs. Delia 
Upchurch, Mrs. Alex Bass, Mr. George M. Floyd 

ERWIN, EAST— Mrs. Hettie McLeod 

ERWIN, FIRST— Mrs. John Wilbourn, Mr. A. H. Ennis, Mrs. Crissie 
Parker, Mrs. Zulie Home, Mrs. Albert Wallace, Mr. Demery 
Williams 

HOLLY SPRINGS— Mr. B. A. Byrd, Deacon, Mr. Graham Patterson, 
Mrs. H. Y. Smith 

KENNEBEC— Miss Clyde Jones 

MACEDONIA— Mrs. Lula Weathers, Mrs. Thetus Dennis 

NEILL'S CREEK— Mrs. Vonnie Parrish, Mrs. Alma B. Hockaday, Mr. 
Milton Wilborn 

OAK GROVE— Mr. Frank Pate, Mrs. Lena Betts, Mr. H. H. Turling- 
ton 

PINEY GROVE— Mrs. Martha Stephenson, Miss Nannie Betts 

RAWLS— Mr. Wilton Gray, Mrs. J. T. Keith, Mrs. R. E. Wheeler 

SWANN'S STATION— Mrs. B J. Morrison 



48 LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 

ORDAINED MINISTERS 

Name Address Church Membership Work 

J. W. Angell, Buie's Creek Buie's Creek Pastor 

J. L. Atkins, Raleigh, Rt. 4 ... Piney Grove Pastor 

J. E. Ayscue, Buie's Creek Buie's Creek Retired 

A. Paul Bagby, Buie's Creek .. Buie's Creek Retired 

J. F. Blackmon, Buie's Creek . Buie's Creek Retired 

W. T. Campbell, Fuquay Springs, Rt. 2 .. Neill's Creek Retired 

J. Ben Eller, Coats Coats Pastor 

C. T. Gray, New Hill, Rt. 3 ? Pastor 

R. F. Hall, Lillington Lillington Retired 

Johnnie A. Hilliard, Angier Kennebec Evangelist 

Julius Holloway, Lillington .Lillington Lillington 

Charles B. Howard, Buie's Creek _. Buie's Creek Pastor 

Earl Howard, Buie's Creek Layton's Chapel Pastor 

Sam F. Hudson, Lillington Lillington Pastor 

E. C. Keller, Dunn Dunn, Second Pastor 

Lester Mann, Durham, Rt. 4 Macedonia Pastor 

Forrest Maxwell, Erwin ...Erwin, First Pastor 

A. C. McCall, Bunnlevel Friendship . Pastor 

Herman Moore, Jr., Clayton Cumberland Union Pastor 

R. E. Moore, Lillington Lillington Pastor 

Roy C. Parker, Buie's Creek Buie's Creek Lie. Pastor 

0. W. Pulley, Erwin Erwin, East Pastor 

C. E. Ruffin, Broadway Broadway Pastor 

E. P. Russell, Dunn Dunn, First Pastor 

Dr. L. C. Smith, Fuquay Springs, Rt. 2 . Chalybeate Spgs. . Lie. Pastor 
Thurman S. Smith, Fqy. Springs, Rt. 2 ... Chalybeate Spgs. . Lie. Pastor 

1. K. Stafford, Buie's Creek Buie's Creek Pastor 

G. Van Stephens, Angier Angier Pastor 

Fulton Thomas, Buie's Creek ? Pastor 

G. Scott Turner, Jr., Wake Forest ? Pastor 

G. Scott Turner, Sr., Kipling Chalybeate Spgs. Pastor 

J. V. Watterson, Buie's Creek Buie's Creek Chaplain 

T. W. Williams, Lillington Lillington Pastor 

L. M. Woolweaver, Mamers Antioch Pastor 

MINISTERS ORDAINED THIS YEAR 

Name Address Church 

J. B. Stephenson, Fort Worth, Texas Angier 

Jack W. Byrd, Erwin Erwin, First 



LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 49 

STUDENTS FOR THE MINISTRY 

Name Church School 

Russell Cutchins, Buie's Creek Campbell 

Jerreal B. Buchanan, Buie's Creek _ Campbell 

Manuel E. Cunnup, Buie's Creek Campbell 

Robert R. Hunter, Buie's Creek _ Campbell 

Dallas D. Hicks, Buie's Creek Campbell 

Thomas E. Wright, Buie's Creek . Campbell 

Truman S. Smith, Chalybeate Springs . Southeastern Seminary 

Tillman Smith, Chalybeate Springs ..- - Wake Forest 

Earl Davis Farthing, Dunn, First Wake Forest 

James Ferrell Sugg, Dunn, First Baylor University 

E. H. Williford, Dunn, Second Campbell 

Lynwood Ragan, Piney Grove Wake Forest 

CHOIR DIRECTORS 

Church Name Address 

Antioch Mrs. E. L. Powell Mamers 

Bethel Leland F. Matthews Linden, Rt. 1 

Broadway H. A. Thomas Broadway 

Buie's Creek Mrs. Preston Stephenson Buie's Creek 

Chalybeate Springs Mrs. Connell Smith Fuquay Springs, Rt. 2 

Coats Mrs. F. H. Fleming Coats 

Cumberland Union John Sears Fuquay Springs, Rt. 1 

Duncan J. D. O'Connell Holly Springs, Rt. 2 

Dunn, First S. David Smith Buie's Creek 

Dunn, Second B. 0. Slaughter Dunn 

Erwin, East W. C. Stone Erwin 

Erwin, First Paul Royall Buie's Creek 

Friendship Mrs. Archibald Byrd Bunnlevel 

Harmony H. S. Hedgepeth Bunnlevel 

Holly Springs Dorothy Brown .Mamers 

Lillington Mrs. Ruth Brown Lillington 

Kennebec Waymon Howard Fuquay Springs, Rt. 2 

Layton's Chapel Robert West Spring Lake 

Macedonia Leo Weathers Holly Springs, Rt. 1 

Oak Grove Onnie Lamm Angier, Rt. 2 

Pleasant Memory Wilton Reardon Lillington 

Rawls Mrs. Clinton Abernathy Fuquay Spgs., Rt. 1 

Swann's Station R. A. Wilson _ Sanford, Rt. 6 



50 LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 

PIANISTS OR ORGANISTS 

Church Name Address 

Angier _ Mrs. Mary Massey Angier 

Antioch Mrs. L. M. Woolweaver Mamers 

Baptist Grove Polly Senter Fuquay Springs 

Bethel ._ Mrs. H. W. Blalock Linden, Rt. 1 

Broadway ..._ .Miss Laura Rosser Broadway 

Buie's Creek ..Mrs. A. E. Lynch Buie's Creek 

Chalybeate Springs Miss Janet Johnson Chalybeate Springs 

Coats Mrs. Dewey Yarley Coats 

Cumberland Union .... Mrs. Thomas Sears Fuquay Springs 

Duncan Mrs. A. E. Rollins Fuquay Springs, Rt. 1 

Dunn, First Mrs. C. C. Upchurch W. Harnett St., Dunn 

Dunn, Second .....B. O. Slaughter Dunn 

Erwin, East Mrs. O. W. Pulley Erwin 

Erwin, First Mrs. D. C. Woodall Erwin 

Friendship ...Miss Roy Jones Bunnlevel 

Harmony ..Mrs. George R. Souders Lillington, Rt. 2 

Holly Springs Nellie Nordon Broadway 

Lillington Mrs. Joe T. Long Lillington, Rt. 1 

Kennebec Dwight Smith Varina, Rt. 1 

Layton's Chapel Mrs. J. W. Fink Spring Lake 

Neill's Creek Mrs. Alyda Smith Lillington, Rt. 1 

Oak Grove Mrs. G. C. Denton Lillington, Rt. 1 

Piney Grove Mrs. John C. Adcock Holly Springs, Rt. 1 

Pleasant Memory Mrs. Carlie McLamb Coats, Rt. 1 

Rawls Mrs. Clinton Abernathy Fuquay Spgs., Rt. 1 

Swann's Station Mrs. Lonnie Taylor . Sanford, Rt. 6 

LIBRARIANS 

Church Name Address 

Antioch Mrs. Jean C. Grasse Mamers 

Dunn, First Miss Jo. Hackett Dunn 

Holiy Springs Nellie Wilson Broadway 



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POPE PTG. CO., DUNN, N. C. 



LITTLE RIVER 
BAPTIST 

ASSOCIATION 
North Carolina 



I 



Seventy-Seventh Annual Session 

Meeting With 

NEILUS CREEK 'BAPTIST CHURCH 

October 28th, 1952 



The next regular session of the Association will meet with 

the Holly Springs Baptist Church on Tuesday after the 

fourth Sunday in October, 1953 

The annual sermon will be preached by Rev. J. Ben EUer 
Rev. E. Weldon Johnson, Alternate 



LITTLE RIVER 
BAPTIST 

ASSOCIATION 
North Carolina 



Seventy-Seventh Annual Session 

Meeting With 

NEILL'S OREEK 'BAPTIST CHURCH 

October 28th, 1952 



The next regular session of the Association will meet with 

the TTolly Springs Baptist Church on Tuesday after the 

fourth Sunday in October, 1953 

The annual sermon will be preached by Rev. J. Ben Eller 
Rev. E. Weldon Johnson, Alternate 



INDEX 

ASSOCIATIONAL DIRECTORY 5 

CHOIR DIRECTORS 39 

CONSTITUTION 10 

LIBRARIANS , 40 

LIST OF MESSENGERS 8 

ORDAINED MINISTERS 38 

OUR BELOVED DEAD 37 

PETITION OF NEW CHURCHES 16 

PIANIST OR ORGANISTS 39 

PROCEEDINGS 12 

PROGRAM 12 

STATISTICAL TABLES BEGIN 41 

STUDENTS FOR THE MINISTRY 38 

REPORTS 

AMERICAN BIBLE SOCIETY 19 

ASSOCIATIONAL MISSIONARY 26 

BAPTIST HOME FOR AGING 24 

BAPTIST HOSPITAL 24 

BAPTIST ORPHANAGE 25 

BAPTIST 1 RAINING UNION 18 

BUDGET COMMITTEE 30 

CHRISTIAN EDUCATION 20 

EVANGELISM 35 

MISSIONS REPORT 34 

RELIEF AND ANNUITY 23 

RESOLUTIONS COMMITTEE 31 

SUNDAY SCHOOL 17 

TEMPERANCE COMMITTEE 32 

TIME, PLACE AND PREACHER COMMITTEE 31 

TREASURER'S REPORT 14 

WOMAN'S MISSIONARY UNION 30 




c:lem waison flowers 

To Whom This Annua} Is Dedicated By Unanimous Vote 

Of The Little River Association, In Its Annual Session, 

October 2S, 1952. 



Clem Watson Flowers, son of James W. and Nancy Temperance 
Flowers was born in Black River Township, Harnett County, on Janu- 
ary 23, 1876. He was baptized on the first Sunday in August, 1896, 
and received into the fellowship of the New Life Baptist Church, 
which later became the Angler Baptist Church. 



4 LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 

Brother Flowers, and his faithful wife have reared two sons, and 
seven daughters — all active church members. There are 23 grand- 
children and 12 great grandchildren. 

Brother Flowers attended Buie's Creek Academy, now Campbell 
College, and was greatly influenced by Dr. J. A. Campbell. 

He has served as a deacon in the Angler Baptist Church for some 
30 years; S. S. Supt. for about 27 years; S. S. teacher for some 47 
years. He has served as song leader, member of the choir, and trustee 
of the church for several years. At the present time, he is a deacon 
and trustee of the church, teacher of an Adult Men's Class, a member 
of the Adult Training Union, and Chairman of one of the Committees 
of the Baptist Brotherhood. It is very unusual for him to miss a service 
or meeting of any kind. 

Brother Flowers has attended 55 of the last 56 annual meetings 
of the Little River Association. He is an humble Christian, a loyal 
Baptist, a devoted husband and father, and a patriotic citizen. He is 
young in spirit, optimistic in outlook, and faithful in the performance 
of duty. He is a layman worthy of praise and example. 



LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 5 

DIRECTORY 
of The Association 

I. GENERAL OFFICERS OF THE ASSOCIATION 

Moderator _ L. H. Campbell, BuTe^ Creek 

Vice-Moderator H. Paul Strickland, Dunn 

Clerk... W. A. Johnson, Lillington 

Treasurer Berles Johnson, Lillington, Rt, 1 

II. EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE MEMBERS 

Moderator L. H. Campbell, Buie's Creek 

Vice-Moderator H. Paul Strickland, Dunn 

Clerk W. A. Johnson, Lillington 

Treasurer Berles Johnson, Lillington, Rt. 1 

S. S. Superintendent : Rev. T. W. Williams, Lillington 

B. T. U. Director Lonnie Small, Buie's Creek 

W. M. U. Supt Mrs. D. B. Andrews, Fuquay Springs, Rt. 2 

Superintenden Evangelism...^ Rev. G. Scott Turner, Lillington 

Brotherhood President Irvin Stephens, Lillington, Rt. 2 

Associational Missionary Rev. Julius Holloway, Lillington 

Rev. E. P. Russell.., ._ ..Dunn 

Rev. Forrest Maxwell Erwin 

Mr. D. B. Dean Lillington 

IN. STANDING COMMITTEES 

Presbytery and Pulpit: 

G. Van Stephens Angier 

Julius Holloway Lillington 

tVeldon Johnson Buie's Creek 

J. Ben Eller _ Coals 

Chm. on Christian Literature Mrs. Perry Langston, Buie's Creek 

dim. on Hospitals Dr. A. W. Peede, Lillington 

Chm. on Mission Mrs. Donald Moore, Coats 

Chm. on Temperance..... Rev. Weldon Johnson, Buie's Creek 

Chm. on Ministers' Annuities Mrs. C. W. Hart, Buie's Creek 

Chm. on Christian Education _ A. R. Bm^kott, Buie's Creek 

Chm. on American Bible Society, Mrs. T. L. Caviness, Fq. Spgs. R. 1 

Chm. on Orphanage Mrs. Alton Johnson, Lillington 

Chm. on Baptist Homes Mrs. Willie Lou McLamb, Dunn 

Chm. on Memorials Mrs. Forrest Maxwell, Erwin 



G LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 

IV. ASSOCIATiONAL MISSIONARY 

Rev. Julius HoUoway { .....Lillington 

V. W. M. U. ASSOCIATIONAL OFFICERS 

Suj3erintendeiu Mrs. D. B. Andrews, Fuquay Springs, Rt. 2 

Associate Superintendent 

Secretar}-Treasurer Mrs. H. M. O'Ouinn, Mamers 

Young People's Leader Mrs. Cliff Amnions, Lillington 

Royal Ambassador Counselor.. ..Mr. Earle Holleman, Fuquay Spgs. 

Mission Study Chairman Mrs. G. Van Stephens, Angier 

Ste-wardship Chairman Miss Lillian Draughon, Dunn 

Margaret Fiuid Chairman Mrs. L. B. Smith, Fuquay Spgs. Rt. 2 

1 raining School Chairman ...Mrs. Forrest Maxwell, Erwin 

Literattne Chairman Miss Ztda Rogers, Mamers 

White Cross Mrs. A. C. Barefoot, Angier 

Comnuniit\ Missions Chairman Mrs. Milton Stevens, Erwin 

Vf. ASSOCIATIONAL SUNDAY SCHOOL OFFICERS 

Supciintendent ...Rev. T. W. Williams, Lillington 

.\ssociatc Supcrimendent Truby Powell, Lillington 

Enlargement Rev. E. P. Russell, Dunn 

7'raining Mrs. G. Van Stephens, Angier 

E\angclism.... Re\ . G. Scott Turner, Lillington 

Vacation Bible School Miss Pat Byrd, Mamers 

Secretary... Mrs. Willie Dean, Lillington 

Departmental Su})erintendents: 

PZxtension Mrs. Leslie Turlington, Buie's Creek 

Adult.. Wilbur Chalk, Dunn 

Young People. Miss Hazel Matthews, Kipling 

Intermediate ...Miss Evelyn Straughan, Dunn 

Juniors Miss Zula Rogers, Mamers 

Primaries Miss Mamie Haighwood, Lillington 

Beginners Miss Ruby Williams, Buie's Creek 

Cradle Roll Mrs. H. M. O'Quinn, Mamers 

Nursery Mrs. C. D. Bain, Dunn 

Grouj) Superintendents: 

No. 1 C. D. Bain Dunn 

No. 2 W. M. Morgan Angier 

No. ?, E. J. Holleman Fuquay Springs 

No. 4 John H. Morgan Lillington, Rt. 2 

No. 5. R. V. McNeil Broadway, Rt. 1 



LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 7 

VII. ASSOCIATIONAL B. T. U. OFFICERS 

Director Lonnie Small, Buie's Creek 

Associate Director Ed. Williford, Buie's Creek 

Secretary-Treasurer Miss Bettic Williford, Buie's Creek 

Choirster T. W. Williams, Lillington 

Pianist Mrs. Neal Ray Johnson, Lillington 

Pastor Advisor A. C. McCall, Bunnlevel 

Department Leaders: 

Nursery Mrs. Charles Taylor, Angier 

Primary.. Mrs. Thurman Collins, Mamers 

Junior..... Miss Bessie McNeill, Broadway, Rt. 1 

Intermediate Mrs. E. L. Powell, Mamers 

Young People Steadman Ray, Angier, Rt. 2 

Adult Miss Lillian Draughon, Dunn, Rt. 5 

Group Leaders: 

No. 1 Miss Janet Byrd Erwin 

No. 2 Mr. Carl Pleasant Angier 

No. 3. W. E. Medlin Fuquay Springs 

No. 4 H. S. Hedgepeth Bunnlevel 

No. 5. Miss Erma Knight Broadway, Rt. 1 

VIII. ASSOCIATIONAL BROTHERHOOD OFFICERS 

President Ervin Stephens, Lillington, Rt. 2 

Advisory Committee T. W. Williams, Lillington; 

E. P. Russell, Dunn; G. Van Stephens, Angier 

Program Vice-President C. R. Ammons, Lillington 

Promotion Vice-President W. M. Morgan, Angier 

Secretary-Treasurer James Brown, Lillington 

Membership Vice-President Wilbur Chalk, Dunn 



. 11.1. RivhR BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



LIST of MESSENGERS 



AXCxIER 



ANTIOCH Mrs. J. P. O'Quinn, Irvin Stephens, Mrs. Irviii 

Stephens, Mrs. H. M. O'Quinn, Miss Alice Patterson 

BAPTISl^ CHAPEL Deas Dickens, A. L. Smith, John Howard, 

J. M. Dickens, Mrs. E. J. Thomas 

BAPTIS 1 GRO\ E Henry Howell, Mrs. Henry Howell, Tyree 

Sentcr, Edward Johnson, L. C. Howell 

BEl HEL Mrs. Eeland F. Matthews, Leland F. Matthews, Mrs. 

O. L. Hamilton, Mrs. Leslie Matthews, James Flowers 

BROADW^AY Leslie Pittman, Mrs. Joe Berry, Owen Taylor, 

Mrs. Rena Ihomas, J. B. Frye 

BUIE'S CREEK Mrs. M. B. Matthews, Worth Lanier, T. T. 

Lanier, B. P. Marshbanks 

CHALYBEAFE SPRLNGS G. R. Wells. Mrs. L. R. Bailey, 

R. \V. McDonald, Mrs. C. K. Smith, Tyson Matthews 

COALS Owen Odum, Eugene Stewart, E. D. Dixon, Mrs. W. D. 

Moore, Mrs. J. R. Butier 

CUMBERLAND UNION Mrs. Mary Fairell, Mrs. S. G. Lanier, 

S. G. Lanier, Mrs. Ellen Arnold, Glenwood Caviness 

DUNCAN Mrs. Alta Tutor, Mrs. Minnie Goodwin, E. T. Tu- 
tor, C. T. Butts, L. V. Pegram 

DUNN, FIRSF Dr. J. M. Morgan, Dr. C. D. Bain, H. Paul 

Strickland, Mrs. Allen H. A. Lee, Mrs. Ralph Maxwell 

DUNN, SECOND Mrs. Troy Faircloth, Mrs. Joe Earnhardt, 

Sylvia Slaughter 

ERW'IN, E.XS'l Mrs. C. M. Baker, Mrs. W. J. Davis, Mrs. 

Lester Mooie, \V. C. Stone, Mrs. W. C. Stone 



ERVVIN, FIRST 

FRIENDSHIP Lamie Byrd, Lhomas Allen, F. M. Allen, Mrs. 

Charlie Strickland, Mrs. Joe Horton 

HARMONY Raeiord Smith, John Morgan, H. S. Hedgpeth, 

Mrs. W. A. Wilkins, Mrs. George R. Souders 
HOLLY SPRINGS Paul Patterson, Mrs. Liele Patterson, Myr- 



LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 9 

lie llionias 

KENNEBEC Coney McLean, Mrs. Coney McLean, Waymon 

Howard, Walter Wagner, Marvin Matthews 

LAYTON'S CHAPEL Hartwell Butts, J. W^ Fink, C. W. 

Painter 

LILLINGTON W. H. Parrish, Mrs. Allen Shaw, Mrs. A. G. 

Rickman 

MACEDONIA ^^J. E. Holt, S. M. Hobby, Mrs. S. M. Hobby, 

Gertrude Smith, Roy Weathers 

NEILL'S CREEK Mrs. Sidney Gregory, Stedman Ray, J. B. 

Keith, Mrs. Vick Mangum, Berles C. Johnson 

OAK GROVE G. C. Denton, Mrs. H. Byrd, H. Byrd, Peele 

Gaskin, Mrs. Peele Gaskin 

PINEY GROVE T. E. Smith, R. E. Austin, Mrs. R. E. Austin, 

M. D. Honeycutt, Mrs. M. D. Honeycutt 

PLEASANT MEMORY Mrs. Carlie McLamb, W. L. Frank- 
lin, Mrs. W. L. Franklin, Mrs. T. H. Penny 

RAWLS Henry Rawls, Mrs. Lillie Jones, Mrs. B. I. Gotten, 

O. J. Sniper, Thomas Moore 

SWANN'S STATION Robert Godfrey, O. R. Link, Richard 

Batchelor, Mrs. Richard Batchelor 



10 LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



CONSTITUTION 



1. This association shall be known as "Little River Baptist 
Association." 

2. The object of this association shall be the advancement of 
the Kingdom of Christ, and the means of accomplishing this shall 
be in strict conformity with the principles of the New Testament. 

3. The association shall have no authority over the internal right 
of any church belonging to it and shall act only as an advisory council. 

4. The association shall be composed or messengers chosen by 
the churches connected with it, each church being entitled to five 
delegates. Ordained ministers having oversight of churches in the 
association, or having their membership in these churches, shall also 
be received as messengers. 

5. A quorum shall consist of messengers from a majority of the 
churches of the association. 

6. The messengers from each church to the annual meeting of the 
association shall bear a letter certifying their appointment and giv- 
ing an account of the condition of the church and a statement of all 
funds contributed for local and benevolent purposes. 

7. The officers of the association shall be a moderator, a vice- 
moderator, a clerk and a treasurer, who shall be chosen annually 
from the members composing the association, and shall continue 
in office until their successors are elected. The term of office of the 
moderator shall begin at the conclusion of the session at which he is 
elected and continue until the close of the next annual meeting. 

8. It shall be the duty of the moderator to preside during the 
deliberations of the body, to enforce the observance of the constitution, 
preserve the decorum, appoint committees except when other provi- 
sions are made for their appointment, decide all questions of order, 
giving his opinion on any question under discussion, and cast the 
deciding vote in case of a tie. 

9. It shall be the duty of the clerk to record the proceedings of 
each annual meeting of the association, superintend the printing of 
the minutes and their distribution among the churches. 

10. It shall be the duty of the treasurer to receive all funds sent 
by the churches or collected during the sessions of this body and to 
disburse the same for the objects stated. He shall present a report on 
all funds administered by him at each annual meeting. 



LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION H 

11. The association shall appoint annually an Executive Promotion 
Committee of 12 members, among whom by virture of their office are 
to be the moderator, vice-moderator, clerk-treasurer, S. S. Supt. of the 
Association, Training Union Director, W. M. U. Superintendent, Supt. 
of Evangelism, the Associational Missionary. This committee shall 
have general supervision of the affairs of the association during the 
interval between the meetings of the body; shall seek to promote the 
welfare of the churches, and their active participation in the causes 
fostered by the denomination; but shall be answerable to the associ- 
ation for its acts, and make an annual report to the association of its 
work. The Executive Promotion Committee shall meet once each quart- 
er and upon other occasions on the call of the moderator. 

12. The association in annual meeting shall appoint a presbytery 
of four members to sit with the pastor of any person whose ordination 
is sought, and the moderator of the association, to examine the quali- 
fications and opportunities for work of the candidate. 

13. The association shall hold an annual meeting commencing on 
Tuesday after the fourth Sunday in October. 

14. A meeting of the association may be called by the moderator 
at any time by the consent of five members of the Executive Com- 
mittee. Each church shall be notified of such a meeting in time to 
send delegates. 

15. This association shall have the right to exclude from its mem- 
bership any church that departs from New Testament principles. 

16. Any church desiring to become a member of this association 
may present a petition at the annual meeting of the body through 
delegates appointed for this purpose. If the association shall consent 
to receive such church the moderator shall extend the hand of fellow- 
ship to the delegates. 

17. The association may invite visitors to seats and extend to them 
all the privileges of the delegates except that of voting. 

18. By appointment, at each annual meeting, an introductory ser- 
mon, and a sermon or address on missions shall be delivered. 

19. This constitution may be amended at any annual session, by 
a vote of two-thirds of the delegates present, provided that notice 
shall be given in the morning session of the day on which such motion 
will be presented. 



12 LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 

PROCEEDINGS 

MORNING SESSION 

1. Moderator L. H. Campbell called the Association to order 
at the Neill's Creek Baptist Church at 9:30 a. m. on October 28, 
1952. The meeting opened with the singing of "O Worship the 
King," lead by Rev. T. W. Williams. 

2. Rev. G. Van Stephens, Pastor of the Angler Baptist 
Church, lead the devotion which consisted of reading Psalms 
127 and 128 and a prayer by Brother Stephens. 

3. The Clerk called the roll of the Churches belonging to 
the Association. After the roll call the Moderator announced 
that a quorum was present, whereupon Rev. E. P. Russell moved 
that the official messengers present constitute the Seventy-Seventh 
Session of the Little River Baptist Association. Said motion was 
duly seconded and passed by unanimous vote. 

4. The Moderator recognized Rev. E. Weldon Johnson and 
Rev. Raymond Britton as new pastors in the Association. He also 
recognized representatives from the South Erwin Baptist Church, 
Gourd Springs Baptist Church and Johnsonville Mission. 

5. The program for the meeting, with the theme "The 
Christian Home— The Key to Church Life," was then presented 
by the Moderator and adopted by unanimous vote. The program 
as presented and adopted reads as follows: 

PROGRAM 

LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSN. 
(Seventy-Seventh Session) 



THEME; 



NEILL'S CREEK BAPTIST CHURCH 
October 28, 1952 



// 



The Christian Home- 



The Key To Church Life" 

MODERATOR; L. H. CAMPBELL 

Director of Music: T. W. Williams 

Mrs. J. T. Long, Organist 

G. Scott Turner. Host Pastor 



LITTLE RIVER BAPTLST ASSOCIATION IS 



MORNING SESSION 

9:30-Hyii]n, Scripture, and Prayer G. Van Stephens 

9: 15— Organization And Business 

Recognition of New Pastors and Visitors 

treasurer's Report Berles Johnson 

Appointment of Committees 

]0:05-Moderator's Report L. H. Campbell 

10:15— Special Music 

"THE CHRISTIAN HOME- 
THE KEY TO EDUCATION" 

10:20— "From Birth to Birth" Weldon Johnson 

10:30-Report of Sunday School T. W. Williams 

10:35— Report of Training Union Lonnie Small 

]0:40-Report on Literature Mrs. L. Jackson 

10:45— American Bible Society Mrs. W. E. Nichols 

10:50— Report on Christian Colleges Owen Odum 

10:55— (Lime to be prorated among representatives of Christian 

Education) 

1 1:20- Address, "Christian Education" Dr. Roger H. Crook 

1 1:50— Announcements and Congregational Singing 

12:00— Annual Sermon L. M. Woolweaver 

12:30— Adjournment for Lunch 

(The food has been provided by the ladies of the Neill's 

Creek, Chalybeate and Lillington Churches) 

AFTERNOON SESSION 

1:30— Hymn, Scripture, and Prayer _ C. E. Ruffin 

1:40— Memorials Mrs. E. P. Russell 

"THE CHRISTIAN HOME- 

THE KEY TO SOCIAL SERVICE" 

1:50-Relief and Annuity Dr. C. D. Bain 

1:55— N. C. Baptist Homes O. W. Pulley 

2:00-N. C. Baptist Hospital Dr. A. W. Peede 

2:05— N. C. Baptist Orphanage Mrs. I. K. Stafford 

2:10— (Time to be prorated among representatives of Social 

Service Agencies.) 
2:30— Announcements and Congregational Singing 

2:35 -Report of Associational Missionary.... Julius HoUoway 

2:50-Business 

Reports of Committees 

Nominating 

Budget 

Time. Place and Preacher 



24 LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 

Miscellaneous 
o: 15— Special Music 

"THE CHRISTIAN HOME- 

1 HE KEY TO SOCIAL RIGHTEOUSNESS" 
3:20— Discussion of Social Righteousness ..A. C. McCall 

(With Emphasis on Good Government) 
1:00— Adjoinnment until Evening Session 

EVENING SESSION 

7:15— Hynni, Scripture and Prayer Zeb Moss 

"THE CHRISTIAN HOME- 
THE KEY TO MISSIONS" 

7:30-\V. M. U. Report Mrs. D. B. Andrews 

7:35— Report on Missions ..Mrs. D. B. Andrews 

7:40— Advance Program in N. C State Representative 

8:10— Annoimcements, Song Service and Special Music 
"THE CHRISTIAN HOME- 
THE KEY TO EVANGELISM" 

8:20— Report on Evangelism..... G. Scott Turner 

8:25— Sermon Dr. }. Winston Pearce 

9:00~Adjournment 

Program Committee: 
Julius Hollowav 
E. P. Russell 
T. W. Williams 

Dr. Roger H. Crook is Professor of Bible at Meredith College. 
Dr. J. AVinsion Pearce is pastor of the First Baptist Church 
of Durham. 

6. Ihc Moderator recognized Berles C. Johnson, Treasurer 
of the Association, for his report. The report as presented and 
adopted reads as follows: 

TREASURER'S REPORT 

Report of Berles C. Johnson, Treasurer of Little River Bap- 
tist Association Missions and Mintite Funds (Noveinber 3, 1951 
through October 15, 1952). 

Balairce in Bank of Lillington Nov. 3, 1951.. | 5.18 

Receipts: 

Angier ._ _ _ 244.12 

Antioch _ ■ 335.00 

Baptist Chapel 00 

Baptist Grove 37.06 

Bethel 00 

Broadway 10.00 

Buie's Creek 210.00 



LIT TLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 15 

Chalybeate Springs 1 14.92 

Coats ..- 191.41 

Cumberland Union 40.00 

Duncan .00 

Dunn, First -.... 950.00 

Dunn, Second __ .00 

Erwin, First ..- 325.00 

Erv/in, Second 50.00 

Friendship 100.00 

Harmony .00 

Holly Springs 00 

Kennebec 7.24 

Layton's Chapel .00 

Piney Grove 100.00 

Lillington 300.00 

NeilFs Creek 121.5G 

Macedonia .0? 

Pleasant Memory 25.47 

Rawls 62.09 

Swann's Station 30.00 

Baptist State Convention 1,380.00 

Cash 30.37 

Associational Minutes 196.00 

Total Receipts $4,865.36 

Included in this total is $323.33 earmarked for Gourd Springs 
Baptist Church Building Fund. 

Expenditures: 

Artlmr H. Stainback (travel to asso.) $ 15.00 

B. L, Mullinax (travel & expense to asso.) 30.00 

A. S. Hale (travel to asso.) 10.00 

Eph Whisenhunt (travel to asso.) 5.00 

J. Clyde Turner (travel to asso.) 5.00 

|. H. Mauney (travel to asso.) 5.00 

To R. E. Moore (salary and expense fund Nov. 3, 1951 

through Feb. 1952) 1,436.00 

To Julius Holloway (salary and expense fund March 

1,' 1952 through October 15, 1952) 2,746.00 

Gray & Creech (supplies) 52.14 

Baptist Book Store (supplies) 28.00 

National Film Service (Spring asso. meeting) 8.00 

Pope Printing Co. (part payment on 1950-51 minutes) 150.00 

Gourd Springs Baptist Church (building fund) 323.33 

Total Ex]:)enditures $4,813.47 



m LIl 1 LE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 

Balance in Bank of Lillington Oct. 15, 1952 | 51.89 

UNPAID BILLS: 

Pope Printing Co. (bal. on 1950-51 minutes) .....$ 145.00 

Expenses of associational officers 150.00 

Clerk 35.00 

$ 830.00 
Respectfully submitted, 

Berles C. Johnson, Treasurer 

7. Rev. G. Scott Turner, Pastor of the Neill's Creek Baptist 
Church, was recognized and extended a warm welcome on behalf 
of the host church. At this time it was pointed out that the Asso- 
ciation was meeting w^ith the Neill's Creek Church because the 
Lillingioii Baptist Church, originally designated as the host 
church for ihis Session, ^vas undergoing extensive repairs and 
therefore not a\ailable for use. 

8. Rev. Forrest Maxwell, Chairman of the Committee ap- 
]x)inted to investigate the Petition of the South Erwin Baptist 
Church for membership in the Association was recognized by 
the Moderator and presented the following Petition to the 
Association: 

PETITION TO THE LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 

South Erwin Baptist Church 
October 28, 1952 
We the members of the South Erwin Baptist Church do hereby 
petition your body now in session at the Neill's Creek Baptist Church 
for admission as a sister church in the Little River Baptist Association. 
We have 39 church members. Sunday School enrollment 78. 

Mrs. Ola House, Church Clerk 
Rev. Raymond Britten, Pastor 
The following Committee recommends this church to the Asso- 
ciation. 

Forrest Maxwell, 

Pastor, Erwin First Baptist Church, chm. 

E. P. Russell, 

Pastor, Dunn First Baptist Church 

Julius Holloway, 

Associational Missionary 

1 hereupon Rev. J. Ben Eiler moved that the South Erwin 
Baptist Church be accepted in the Association and such motion, 
upon being duly seconded, was unanimously passed. 

9. Associational Missionary Julius Holloway was recognized 
for a report of the committee appointed to investigate the Peti- 
tion of the Gourd Springs Baptist Church. Mr. Holloway pre- 
sented the following petition: 



LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 17 

PETITION TO THE LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 

Gourd Springs Church 
October 28, 1952 
We the members of the Gourd Springs Baptist Church do hereby 
petition your body now in session at the Neill's Creek Baptist Church 
for admission as a sister church in the Little River Baptist Association. 
We have 52 church members. Sunday School enrollment 92. 

Mrs. B. E. Lucas, Church Clerk 
Rev. B. E. Lucas, Pastor 
The following Committee recommends this church to the Asso- 
ciation: 

Julius Holloway, 

Associational Missionary 

T. W. Williams 

Pastor, Lillington Baptist Church 

A. C. McCall, 

Pastor, Friendship Baptist Church 

Upon motion duly made and seconded the Petition was 
allowed and the Moderator thereupon extended a welcome to 
these two new churches. 

10. A male (juartet from Campbell College was recognized 
by the Moderator and rendered two musical selections. 

11. Rev. E. Weldon Johnson, Pastor of the Buie's Creek 
Baptist Church, delivered a brief and inspiring message on the 
need for Christian homes and the value of parents exerting 
Christian influence on their children in early life. 

12. Re\. T. W. Williams presented his report on the work of 
the Sunday Schools. His report, as presented and adopted, is as 
follows: 

THE ASSOCIATIONAL SUNDAY SCHOOL REPORT 

The Sunday School work of the Little River Baptist Association 
has gone forward in a wonderful way during this past year. Four 
general conferences and officers meetings were held. The Vacation 
Bible School Clinic was one of the best ever, and as a result the 
Bible Schools were the best ever. Ten teams of workers have just 
completed the work of presenting the aims of our Sunday School 
work for this new church year. These aims are: (1) A net enrollment 
gain of 500,000 (This is only 1-5 of our unenrolled church members). 
This means for our association a gain of 1,150 or 15 for every 100 
church members. Our gain in 1950 was 328. In 1951 it was 454. In 
1952 it was 515. We will need to work hard to reach this goal. For 
some churches this will mean additional classes or additional depart- 



18 LITILE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 

ments and additional workers. We grow at the rate of 10 pupils for 
each new worker. Perhaps some churches will need to organize a 
branch Sunday School. Some will need to set up a systematic pro- 
gram of visitation— WHEN WE GO— THEY COME. Some will need 
to start weekly or monthly officers and teachers meetings. There 
should be a program of training for workers. We are recommending 
group training schools in our association again this year. These have 
proven very successful. 

(2) A Vacation Bible School in every church for two weeks if 
possible. 

(3) January Bible Study Week. We are to study the Book of 
Philippians, using Dr. Ralph Herring's study guide. 

(4) A Christian home for every child. 

(5) All these efforts centered in winning people to Christ. 
Five things stand out this year: More people, more Bible study, 

more complete church families, stronger churches, and more Christi- 
ans. 

Respectfully submitted: 

T. W. Williams 

Associational S. S. Superintendent 

13. The report of the Training Union was read by Mr. Lonnie 
Small, Association Training Union Director. His report was 
adopted and reads as follows: 

REPORT OF THE TRAINING UNION 

Little River Baptist Association 
Neill's Creek Baptist Church, October 28, 1952 

The Baptist Training Union of the Little River Baptist Association 
reporting to the Little River Association, meeting with the Neill's 
Creek Baptist Church, October 28, 1952. 

The Training Union of this Association has in many ways had a 
rather encouraging year, even in spite of being so badly disorganized 
in the beginning. Securing active co-operation from the group leaders 
was the most difficult task, partly because of failure on the part of 
the director to go with the leaders into the churches. 

Turning now to the bright side of training union work in the 
Association, the report shows a definite increase in many of the 
activities engaged in during the year. Four Associational mass meet- 
ings were held and each was well attended and well received. 

I mention only two of them. The first known as "M" Night was 
held at the Campbell College auditorium on December 8. This 
meeting was held for the purpose of setting up goals and launching 
our new year program. The showing of the film "Christ Speaks to 
the Churches" was narrated on by Mrs. Charles Howard of Buie's 
Creek. A fourteen point new year program was presented by the 
director and adopted by the churches. As a final climax to this initial 



UTILE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 19 



meeting Dr. J. W. Angel brought an inspiring message on "Christ 
Speaks." Another of the meetings was held in the Buie's Creek 
Baptist Church. At this meeting representative groups from the 
churches entering the Training Union Promotional Contest present- 
ed themselves, and winners were chosen to represent the Association 
in the regional meeting held at Durham First Baptist Church, April 
2nd and 3rd. We were represented at the regional meeting by winners 
in the Adult Bible Readers Contest, the Young Peoples Speakers 
Contest, the Intermediate Sword Drill, and the Junior Memory Work 
Contest. Our Juniors won in the Regional meeting and later were 
declared State winners at the State Summer Assembly. There was 
evidence at the meetings that a great training program is being con- 
ducted on a local church level through-out the Association. 

During the summer with the help of Miss Mary Evelyn Hensley 
and Miss Ann Fuller of the State Training Union Department, we 
organized two new training unions, one at Kennebec and the other 
at Bethel. Both are already doing good work. In the past few days a 
most heartening report has been received from Mrs. Irvin T. Ellen, 
the training union director at Kennebec. They now have 71 members 
with a department for every age group. 

During the year, the Executive Committee held the required 
number of executive committee meetings. Tribute is paid to Mr. 
Truby Powell for his outstanding work as Associate Director. 

We are under a deep conviction that there is a great need for 
training in church membership in our association. The responsibility 
to meet this need is placed squarely upon the shoulders of the train- 
ing union organizations now existing, and upon pastors and leaders 
in the Association. The task is before us. This Association is promised 
land. We are well able to possess it. Do we dare accept the challenge? 

Sincerely in His Name, 
Lonnie D. Small 
Training Union Director 
Little River Baptist Association 

14. Report of the American Bible Society was given by Mrs. 
W. E. Nichols. Her report, as adopted, reads as follows: 

AMERICAN BIBLE SOCIETY REPORT FOR 1952 

The task of the American Bible Society is to open the Book of 
Books to the people of every land and language — to place in their 
hands scriptures which they can read — presented in a way they will 
read. 

It would be easy just to give away scriptures but opening the 
Bible to people is a task demanding thought, prayer, experience and 
the assistance of hundreds of thousands of Bible lovers. The distri- 
bution of the Bible is' still a must in Mission Work, 

During 1951 the American Bible Society — 



20 LIT! LE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 

— distributed at home and abroad more than 16 million volumes, 
of scriptures; 

— helped the Japan Bible Society to distribute 3,372,803 Scripture 
volumes, making a total of approximately 10 million volumes distri- 
buted in Japan since V-J Day. 

— in Korea, supplied over 1 million scripture volumes for civilians, 
South Koreans and other UN armed forces and North Koreans and 
Chinese in prison-of-war camps. 

— aided the Brazil Bible Society to reach the largest Scripture 
distribution in the country's history 1,510,712 volumes. Of these 168,670 
were whole Bibles; 

— provided 941,241 Scripture volumes for our Armed Forces, bring- 
ing the number supplied since 1940 to more than 10 million volumes; 

— received from churches and individuals, gifts which made possible 
the largest budget in its history — and in faith adopted an even greater 
program for 1952; 

— but faced additional requests from many fields, especially Brazil, 
Korea, and Japan, emphasizing the fact that a world-wide missionary 
advance, through increased Scripture distribution, waits . . . waits only 
for needed funds. 

In 1951, Southern Baptists Churches gave $90,909 to the American 
Bible Society. $9,643.76 came from churches in the North Carolina Bap- 
tist State Convention. Southern Baptist gifts stood second, exceeded 
only by Methodist gifts which amounted to $120,812. 

Increased gifts from Southern Baptists will help provide enough 
Bibles now and will inspire others to give more. Please send gifts 
from your church to your Baptist State Headquarters office, marked 
"for the American Bible Society." 

Respectfully submitted, 
Mrs. W. E. Nichols 

15. Mr. Owen Odum gave the report of the committee on 
Christian Education and his report, as presented and adopted, 
reads as follows: 

REPORT OF COMMITTEE ON CHRISTIAN EDUCATION 

Christian Education grew up with the American way of life. 
In the early Colonial life there was little time for getting a formal 
education. Money was scarce, and the leaders were slow to tax 
people for an education. The common theory was to let each man 
educate his own children. Hence, private tutors were employed to 
teach the children in the home. Then leading parents in the com- 
munity would unite their efforts and secure the teacher. 

These efforts were often worked out by leading church people. 
A teacher was secured and a building erected in close proximity to 
the church by the leading church people. Now we have the home, 
the church and school closely knit together. Almost all education 



L ITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 21 

conducted in that manner was Christian Education. Parents considered 
education of their children part of their Christian duty to them. 
Oftentimes the teacher was the minister of the leading denomination 
of the community. It was out of this kind of thinking that our deno- 
minational academies grew up. These educational centers had develop- 
ed a profound influence at the turn of the twentieth century. Indeed, 
a large number of our higher colleges and universities grew up as 
church schools. Such an educational program could serve only the 
tew who were able to pay their way. 

By the turn of the twentieth century leaders throughout our 
state were advocating public education to be supported by public 
taxes. This was to give all children an equal opportunity for an 
education. As this idea grew, the gap between the church and school 
grew wider and wider. Today we have tax supported schools dotting 
our land from the mountains to the sea. Our children are taken to 
and from these schools' at public expense. Teachers are secured by state 
officials. Indeed they are state employees. The church is left out 
altogether. No semblance of Christian Education is in this set up. 

But being good Baptists as we are, we would have it no other 
way. Complete separation of church and state is one of the fundamen- 
tals of Baptist. As, indeed, it is one of the fundamentals of our 
government. 

Confronted then as we are with a complete change in economical, 
social, political, and educational conditions in our country, what shall 
we do about Christian Education? To drop it, or to turn it over to 
the State, is unthinkable. 

What is Christian Education? How does it differ from secular 
education? Christian Education deals with facts in the same way 
as secular education. But it goes further. It deals with motives, the 
will, social concern, the church as the center of social culture, con- 
science and character. These are taught best perhaps by the atmosphere 
of the school. Hence, the importance of Christian teachers. The life 
of the teacher teaches a great deal more than his subject. We must 
ever be on the alert to secure Christian teachers to run our Christian 
schools. 

We are fortunate to have in our association just such a school 
in Campbell College. Somehow we must find more money from the 
general fund, private gifts, etc. to run this Christian school in a 
better and larger way. 

While we must not neglect our Christian school, we must also 
not neglect the importance of the home, and the church as live 
igencies in a real program of Christian Education. 

Respectfully submitted, 
Owen Odum, Chairman 



22 LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 

1(). in (onneclion with tiie report on Cliristian Education, 
Dr. Roger H. Crook, Professor ot Bible at Mereditli College, 
delivered an informative address on the distinctive aspects of a 
Christian College. Following his address an informal discussion 
ivas had and Moderator Campbell delivered a brief comment 
:)n the work l)eing done by Campbell College and emphasized 
Lhe need for additional financial help from all Baptist schools 
in order that such schools might be in a better position to com- 
[)ete with publicly financed institutions. 

17. Moderator Campbell appointed the following committees: 

a. Nominating Committee: 

Julius Holloway, Chairman, G. Scott Tianer, Mrs. 
D. B. Andrews, T. W. AVilliams and Lonnie Small. 

b. Committee on Resolutions: 

Mrs. Henry Hamilton, Chairman, Raymond Britton 
and J. H. Morgan. 

c. Committee on Time, Place and Preacher: 

Owen Odum, Chairman, W. M. Morgan and B. P. 
Marshbanks. 

d. Budget Committee: 

L. H. Campbell, Chaiiiiian, H. Paul Strickland, Berles 
C. Johnson and Julius Holloway. 

18. Re\-. L. M. A\'oolweaver was introduced by the Moderator 
to preach the Annual Sermon. Rev. AVoolweaver delivered an 

inspiring message based on Luke 22:28. 

19. lhe Session recessed lor the lunch hour and enjoyed an 
excellent meal prepared by the Neill's Creek, Lillington and 
Chalybeate Springs Chinches and served on the grounds of the 
host chiuxh. 

AFTERNOON SESSION 

20. lhe Association reconvened for the Afternoon Session 
at 1:30 p. m. with the singing of "What a Friend We Have in 
fesus." Re\'. C^. E. Ruffin read several verses of scripture and 
lead the opening prayer. 

21. Mrs. E. P. Russell read the names of the church mem- 
bers in the Association who had died during the preceding 
year. A complete list of tliesc deceased members appears in these 
minutes on page 37. 

22. lhe Moderator commented on the fact that the An- 
nual Session was being held in the oldest church in the Associ- 
ation, the host church having been established in 1819. He 
recognized Mrs. Miranda Matthews, who has attended twenty-six 
annual meetings without interruption, and Mr. C. W. Flowers, 



LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 23 

who has attended every session except one for the past fifty-six 
)ears. 

23. Dr. C. D. Bain presented the report of the Relief and 
Annuity Board, which report was adopted and reads as follows: 

REPORT OF THE RELIEF AND ANNUITY BOARD 

of the 

LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST CONVENTION 

The general plan of the Relief and Annuity Board is as follows: 
The pastor pays 4 per cent of his salary; his church pays 4 per cent 
of his salary; the Convention adds to that amount. This builds up a 
fund from which an annuity is paid to the minister in case of dis- 
ability or of age retirement. 

The Board feels that far too many pastors are retiring without 
any source of income, thus adding to the burden of the relief depart- 
ment. It suggests two ways to help this situation. First, that churches 
take a Fellowship offering for ministerial relief on the first Sunday 
in June; Second, that a date should be set, after which time, no pas- 
tor would be eligible for assistance from the relief department un- 
less he had tried to do something for himself by being a member 
of the Ministers Retirement Plan. 

Pastors in the Little River Association in the Plan are: 

G. Van Stephens, Angler 
J. Ben Eller, Coats 
E. P. Russell, Dunn 
Forrest Maxwell, Erwin 
Weldon Johnson, Buie's Creek 
A. C. McCall, Friendship 
E. C. Keller, Dunn, Second 

Every active pastor should take advantage of the opportunity 
which his denomination has provided that he may not face a penni- 
less old age. 

For further information regarding this and the Widows' Supple- 
mental Plan, write to Dr. M. A. Huggins, Raleigh, North Carolina. 

Respectfully submitted, 
C. D. Bain 

24. Ihe report on the N. C. Baptist Home was presented 
by Rev. O. W. Pulley. His report was adopted and reads as 
follows: 



24 LIITLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 

REPORT ON NORTH CAROLINA BAPTIST 
HOME FOR THE AGING 

RESTHAVEN, WINSTON-SALEM, N. C. 

Operation of Resthaven was begun March 16, 1951. Soon after the 
opening, it was filled to capacity, twenty residents. When the news 
spread of the beginning, applications began to accumulate rapidly. 
To date, there have been close to 500 inquiries. Had there been rooms 
available, and all applicants could have made financial arrangement, 
our Home would have had 200 residents instead of twenty. 

Residents range in age from 64 to 92 years, and come from widely 
scattered sections of our State. 

In spite of the fact that Resthaven did not receive financial 
assistance last year from the Baptist State Convention (except a loan 
which was repaid), it was operated clear of a deficit. By the friends 
responding, and the residents who came on the monthly-pay plan, 
we were able to do this. 

Our Home presents a great challenge to N. C. Baptist to provide 
adequate facilities for our thousands of people of 65 years of age or 
older. 

Respectfully submitted, 
O. W. Pulley 
25. Dr. A. \V. Peede delivered the report on the Baptist 
Hospital and his report, which was adopted, reads as follows: 

YOUR BAPTIST HOSPITAL 

October 28, 1952 

The North Carolina Baptist Hospital opened its doors to receive 
its first patient on May 28, 1923. It was originally an 80 bed institution, 
enlarged in 1942 to 250 beds and 50 bassinets. This Hospital admitted 
10,491 persons as bed patients in 1951 and rendered a total of 92,177 
days of patient care. The new South Wing is now under construction 
and should be completed in 1953, making a total of 450 beds available 
to all classes of people. 

The Wake Forest College Medical School was expanded from a 
two year to a full four-year medical school in 1941 and is closely 
associated with the Baptist Hospital. 

The School of Nursing was opened in 1923 and graduated its 
first class in 1926. A total of 505 students have graduated since 
then, and are approved by the North Carolina Board of Nurses. 

There is also connected with the Hospital a School of X-Ray 
Technology, a School for Nurse Anesthetists, a School of Laboratory 
Technology and a School for Medical Records-Librarians. 

The Hospital is the property of North Carolina Baptists, dedi- 
cated to healing and teaching and is the expression of their desire 
to minister to the physical, mental and moral needs of all patients. 



LITTL E RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 25 

To meet this need, the Hospital has a Department of Religion with 
a director, two Chaplains and a student secretary. Their duties con- 
sist of pastoral care for the patients and their families, and pro- 
motion of a religious program for nurses and medical students. 

Funds received each year in Mother's Day Offerings are used 
exclusively to help pay the hospital expenses of those patients who 
can pay only a part or none of their hospital expenses. Receipts in 
1951 totalled $157,130.88. During the year 1951 the Hospital rendered 
free service in the amount of $456,788.50 to needy persons. Mother's 
Day Offerings for 1952 from Little River Association are as follows: 

Chalybeate $ 152.41 Broadway $ 93.00 

Dunn, 2nd 32.05 Pleasant Memory .... 60.50 

Rawls Oak Grove 25.00 

Holly Springs 50.34 Baptist Grove 

Harmony 55.00 Xeill's Creek 51.70 

Angler 65.30 Antioch 176.80 

Macedonia 26.65 Erwin, East 70.00 

Kennebec _ 30.40 Piney Grove 50.00 

Friendship _ 50.45 Cumberland Union 15.00 

Swann Station 90.00 Lillington 99.96 

Layton's Chapel 67.50 Coats 90.82 

Erwin, Jst 250.00 Total $1,612.88 

The goal set for Little River Association for Hospital Expansion 
Program — $7,430.00; at the last report the amount received on this 
was $7,202.43. 

Respectfully submitted, 

A. W. Peede, M. D., Chairman 

26. Report on the Baptist Orphanages was presented by 
Mrs. I. K. Stafford and this report, as adopted, reads as follows: 

REPORT OF BAPTIST ORPHANAGES 

"North Carolina Baptists have always been in the forefront in 
mmistry to the dependent child," says Mr. W. C. Reed, general super- 
intendent of our orphanage. We believe that "a nation, or people, or 
religious denomination that neglects its children is signing its own 
death warrant." 

The remodeling of cottages, building of new ones and the print 
shop, infirmary, and church has been going on throughout the year. 
The Idol wills made possible the print shop, infirmary, and church. 
A recreation center, much needed at Mills Home, will be completed 
soon. This is to be called the I. G. Greer Recreation Center. 

Through the once-a-month offering and the Thanksgiving offering 
we have supported our orphanage work for many years.Naturally the 
cost of operation has increased as prices have risen. So as we give 



26 LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 

our Thanksgiving offering this year we are asked to increase our 
gifts. Only two churches in our association failed to give thru this 
offering last year; let's be 100 per cent this year^ 

"Charity and Children" published in the print shop at Mills 
Home keeps us informed about this phase of our work. To read it 
weekly and see the interesting pictures makes our orphanage work 
come alive. Besides it contains some of the most helpful Christian 
reading to be found anyv/here. In bundles of ten or more sent to one 
address the cost is only 60 cents a year. If your church does not have 
"Charity and Children" please write Editor Marse Grant, Thomas- 
ville, N. C. and begin to read this informative weekly paper. 

Respectfully submitted, 
Mrs. I. K. Stafford 

27. Following presentation of the two above mentioned re- 
ports, Dr. W. K. McGhee spoke on the work of the Baptist 
Hospital and Mr. W. C. Reid spoke on the work of the Orphan- 
ages. 

28. Following se\'eral announcements and the singing oi 
"The Chtaxli's One Foundation," Associational Missionary 
Holiow^ay delivered his report. Upon the presentation of his re- 
]X)rt he was commended for the fine work he is doing and upon 
motion duly made and seconded, was granted a two-weeks vaca- 
tion. Mr. Holloway's report as adopted reads as follows: 

ASSOCIATIONAL MISSIONARY REPORT 

We look back with humble pride on the achievements of the 
past year. And yet when we look back we see many things that should 
have been done. Our hope is that many of these will be accomplished 
next year. With rare exception, in my contacts with the churches, 
they have shown a marvelous spirit of willingness to cooperate in 
the things we have tried to do. Some of our churches have gone the 
second mile to support; in finances, in labor when asked, in prayers, in 
sympathy and cooperation with the work. The major portion of the 
churches have supported the finances for the work which has been 
gratifying. Though some have not given us as much as they could for 
the work in their churches or for the mission work. Some of the 
churches that have contributed most have not seen the Missionary in 
their church more than tv/o or three times during the year. Where 
the work is needed most they are the least able to pay. Yet the fruit 
of the support of those who have paid is seen in the work of the 
missions where a good deal of my time has been spent. The churches 
that have supported the work the most have not particular needed 
my work anyway since they were able to carry on. However it is 
hoped that the others will show enough gratitude for what has been 
done to send in at least a little for the support of the work. 



LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 27 

We have every reason to thank the Lord, take new courage and 
go forward with the work. I am sure that the great fellowship of 
of our Association rejoices in the accomplishments that have been 
made this year. We wish to express our thanks and appreciation to 
Rev. R. E. Moore who laid the plans and got the work started this 
year, and to all ^vh'^ have assisted in the work in anyway. Without 
your work and voluntary support we could not have done anything. 
It is not our aim to say to the churches you have to do this or that. 
But to be progressive, and do our share to make the kingdoms of this 
world become the kingdoms of our Lord, v/e must lead to bigger 
and more noble things. I am sorry for any group or individual that 
feels it is doing the very best it can. We can improve if we will. I 
saw a little thing on a calendar sometime ago that said, "None of us 
are perfect, but the worst of it is some of us are impossible." That 
is so because we fail to see the need of improvement. 

Here are some of the things we have helped do: 

Deacons schools planned __ 3 

VV. M. U. Meetings attended 3 

Brotherhood meetings attended .._ 3 

Training Union meetings attended _-.._ 6 

State, regional, and Rural Church Develoj^ment meetings 14 

Letters and cards written and mailed 1,578 

Bulletins published and mailed 3,575 

Sermons preached regular services or special days 25 

Sermons preached in tvv^o-week revival _._ 16 

Cottage prayer meetings conducted 6 

Study courses taught _._. 8 

Group and individual conferences held ._ _ 633 

Worked in Vacation Bible Schools _ _ 10 

Visits to churches other than revival or special services 50 

Led singing in revivals 2 

Led Morning Devotions WCKB, one week 5 

Conducted Religion in the News WCKB each Saturday 
morning 8:30 

W^rote religious article for Harnett County News each week 

Funerals conducted 3 

Executive committee meetings attended 13 

Taught Sunday School Lesson in Prison 2 

Wedding ceremonies performed 2 

Baptisms performed _. 2 

Officiated at Lord's supper ____ 2 

Miles Traveled 12,566 

Served on Committee to organize church --- 1 

Served on committee to investigate churches to come 

into Association 2 



28 LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 

"A" Night meeting planned -. 1 

Planned with Campbell College a course RELIGIOUS 

P^DUCATION for Ministers, Educational Directors, 

(Church Secretaries, who were not able to take full 

college work. 

Attended State Association Alissionary Conference Caswell 

One Week 
Presented Denominational and Associational causes to indivi- 
duals and churches at every opportunity. 
Started one mission in Johnsonville township. Attendance has 
grown in Sunday School from 17 to 60. Attendance for preaching 
services has grown from 20 to 75. We started meeting in a small two- 
room tenant house of Simon Campbell. A number of ministers and 
layman in the Association have visited and spoken to the group. We 
have outgrown the building the petition was taken out and curtains 
put up to divide classes. After we had filled the building in this way 
a committee was appointed to find a building site on which we 
could build a building large enough to hold the group. A building 
site was given by O. H Mangirum and has been cleaned off. A 
lot of timber has been promised we are going to cut it take to mill 
and have it sawed and do the work ourselves. A piano has been bought 
and paid for. We have now about $300.00 dollars to apply on the 
building. All literature has been paid for out of the treasury. 

The South Erwin Baptist Chapel sponsored by the First Baptist 
Church in an old beer parlor for awhile as a mission, has built and 
paid for its own building and was organized into a Baptist Church 
October 12, 1952. The new church is built just a little way from the 
mission site. The present church membership is 39, Sunday School 
attendance 78. A Training Union has been organized and much in- 
terest is being shown the attendance is 35. The present pastor is Rev. 
Raymond Britten a student at Campbell. This is a daughter of the First 
Church Erwin v/ho I am sure is very proud of her child and will con- 
tinue to watch with pride her growth and development. The First 
Church has loaned workers, given time, money, council and much 
prayer for the work. Without love, watchcare and interest the mother 
would not have seen her child as it is today. 

The Gourd Springs Baptist Church started as a mission Sunday 
School under a tobaccobarn shelter and was organized into a church 
sometime last year. Rev. B. E. Lucas has been ordained and is now 
serving as pastor. They have 52 church members, Sunday School 
attendance is 85. Their building is not complete but is paid for as 
far as they have gone they are using it. A number of churches in 
our Association contributed toward the building. A few weeks ago 
a revival was held and I Baptised 14. Plans are being made to or- 
ganized a Training Union. The spirit of fellowship and cooperation is 
fine. Brother Lucas is leading in a marvelous way. Possibilities are 



LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 29 

great in this field. 

The Dunn First Baptist Church has a mission Sunday School. 
Enrollment has reached 73. 49 were present October 19th. They have 
outgrown the building they started in and new rooms are being added 
to take care of the increase. Rev. W. L. Davenport is preaching, he 
is a student at Campbell College. Dunn First has also loaned workers, 
given money, time, and prayers to see this child of hers grow. 

Only Heaven will reveal the full results of the work that is being 
done by these mother churches in their efforts to see their children 
grow into sister churches of which they will be proud. 

Another Mission Point your missionary would like to see started 
is at the crossroads near Lillington at Mr. Barnes store or at the air- 
port. Plans have been and are being discussed with T. W. Williams and 
G. Scott Turner, pastors of Lillington and Neill's Creek churches. 
It is hoped that a Burlington Mills plant will be there in the near 
future. But now is the time for us to start something. If we don't 
other groups will and their teachings are contrary to our beliefs and 
the teaching of the Bible. A census from the Neill's Creek Church 
showed mostly Baptist preferences there now. If we can get a mission 
started we might be laying the foundation for one of the greatest 
Baptist Churches in our Association in the future. I covet your prayers 
and suggestions as this committee works on plans for this project. 

OTHER THINGS I WOULD LIKE TO SEE DONE NEXT YEAR 

1. All churches using Associational Calendar which will be pre- 
pared in just a little while. 

2. Continue work of Associational Missionary employed full-time. 
Each Church supporting it. 

3. Have a five-day S. S. teacher training course in group schools. 

4. Plan school of Missions. 

5. Have invitations from more churches to show slides and film- 
strips on Denominational work. 

6. Each church with a good budget. Help can be had from State 
or Assocational office. 

7. An Association wide stewardship week, October 18-25, 1953. 

8. Sometime a pastorium for Missionary large enough for family 
and office. 

9. A five-day Training Union workers training course. 

Respectfully submitted. 
Rev. Julius Holloway 

29. llie Moderator announced that the program was being 
changed to enable Mrs. D. B. Andrews to present the report on 
W. M. U. work at this point rather than at the Evening Session 
as originally planned. Mrs. Andrews' report, as presented and 
adopted, reads as follows: 



30 LniLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 

REPORT OF WOMAN'S MISSIONARY UNION 

Woman's Missionary Union of Little River Association has had a 
good year. Missionary Societies have been organized in three churches 
where there were no Missionary organizations. These were Duncan, 
Cumberland Union, and Macedonia. We now have enrolled in our 
societies 1110 women, 349 of whom are tithers. 

We are mindful of the fact that there are at present four churches 
with no Missionary organizations. If you belong to one of these church- 
es, or if you are pastor of such a church, will you not help us to or- 
ganize the women and young people? 

Our annual meeting was held in the Lillmgton church in March, 
with 19 churches represented. An inspiring program was presented, 
and supper was served by the women of the hostess church. 

Three associational meetings and a leadership conference have 
been held. Many women from our association attended the overnight 
Institute at Campbell College. 

Our young people under the direction of Mrs. C. R. Ammons, have 
made notable progress. Their Rally was held in the First Baptist 
Church in Dunn in September. 

Our watchword for the new year is John 4:35, "Lift up your eyes 
and look on the fields, for they are white already unto harvest." Then, 
as we behold the needs of a sin-sick world, we realize that "The har- 
vest truly is plenteous, but the laborers are few." We "pray therefore, 
the Lord of the harvest will send forth laborers into His harvest." 

We would enlist every woman within our association, and fully 
commit ourselves to the glorious task of carrying Christ to the whole 
wide world. 

Respectfully submitted, 
Mrs. D. B. Andrews 

30. The Moderator recognized Mr. Julius Holloway for the 
report of the Nominating Committee and the report of this com- 
mittee was unanimously adopted. The adoption of said report 
resulted in the election of the several officers listed in the direc- 
tory of these Minutes. 

31. Mr. H. Paul Strickland was recognized for the report of 
the Budget Committee. The report of this committee as present- 
ed and adopted is as follows: 

REPORT OF BUDGET COMMITTEE 

We recommend the following budget for the Little River 
Association for the year 1952-53. 
Missionary: 

Salary of Missionary ....|2,700.00 



L I TTL E RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 31 

Travel expense 900.00 

Housing - - - - 600.00 

Retirement - .- — - 96.00 

Printing and supplies 300.00 

General: 

Expenses of associational officers -..- 150.00 

Printing and distribution of minutes 300.00 

Clerk .' _ .-.._ 35.00 

Total Budget $5,081.00 

We recommend that the churches be requested to give 3 per 
cent of their budget exclusive of the building fund, for Associ- 
ational Missions. 

Respectfully submitted, 

H. Paul Strickland 
L. H. Campbell 
Julius Holloway 
Berles C. Johnson 

In connection with this report, attention was called to the 
fact that the Treasurer's Report showed a deficit of $330 for the 
year just ending. Upon motion of Rev. E. P. Russell, the Asso- 
ciation voted unanimously to prorate this deficit among the 
member churches on the basis of church membership. 

32. Mr. Owen Odum was recognized and gave the following 
report of the Committee on Time, Place and Preacher: 

Preacher: Rev. }. Ben Eller, Pastor of the Coats Baptist 

Church. 
• Alternate: Rev. E. Weldon Johnson, Pastor of the Buie's 

Creek Baptist Church. 
Place: Holly Springs Baptist Church. 
Time: October 27, 1953. 

33. Rev. R. L. Britton presented the report of the Committee 
on Resolutions. The report as adopted reads as follows: 

REPORT OF RESOLUTIONS COMMITTEE 

The members of the Little River Association meeting with the 
Neill's Creek Baptist Church on October 28, 1952, wish to express 
their sincere thanks to the pastor and the members for their most 
cordial hospitality. We give thanks to the women of Neill's Creek, 
Lillington and Chalybeate Springs for the bountiful supply of the 
delicious food served. 

To the program committee, Rev. E. P. Russell, Rev. T. W. WiUiams 



32 LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSQCJATION 

and Rev. Julius Holloway for the fine program they have arranged. 
To each speaker on the program for their message and reports. 
To the Campbell College quartet for their special music. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Mrs. H. M. O'Quinn 

Mr. J. H. Morgan 

Mr. R. L. Britton 

34. Rev. G. Scott Turner was recognized and commented 
briefly on the long and faithful service rendered by Mr. C. W. 
Flowers. Upon motion by Rev. Turner, duly seconded, the Asso- 
ciation voted unanimously to dedicate the 1952 Minutes to Mr. 

Howlers. 

35. Upon motion of Rev. E. P. Russell, duly seconded, Julius 
Holloway was appointed as Associational Missionary for the 
ensuing year. 

3{). 1 he Moderator recognized a quartet from the Lillington 
l^aptist Church for two musical selections. 

37. Rev. A. C. McCall delivered the report of the Temper- 
ance Committee. His report as presented and adopted is as follows: 

REPORT ON TEMPERANCE 

BILLIONS FOR LIQUOR 

Americans spend on liquor in one year, 91/2 billions. Four times 
the amount for bread, nine times that for soft drinks, 35 per cent 
more than for milk, and eight times the gifts to churches, therefore, 
the consumption of alcohol is on the increase. In 1932,, the last full 
year of prohibition, the American people were annually consuming 
1.69 gallons of alcoholic beverage per capita. Today they are drinking 
30.6 gallons annually per capita. 

CRIME ON THE INCREASE 

Since 1932, arrests for drunkenness have almost tribbled, and 
arrests for driving while drunk are two and one-quarter times greater. 
The FBI reports a phenominal increase for all types of liquor offenses — 
from the simplest to the major crimes. All of which indicates that 
crime conditions are growing steadily worse. 

In Massachusetts, a crime commission headed by J. T. Zollata, 
associate Justice of the Boston Municipal Court, reports that 50 per 
cent of the felonies and 85 per cent of the misdemeanors are due to 
drinking. 

Mayor Martin Kennelly of Chicago says that 80 per cent of all 
cases sent to the City lock-ups involve liquor. 

Judge John J. King of Columbus, Ohio, says that 80 per cent of 
the crimes in his city are committed under the influence of drink. 



LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 33 

In Washington, D. C, our National Capital, 14,000 arrests out of 
19,000 arrests, were for drunkenness. This was in 1949. 

In Charlotte, North Carolina, adult crime increased 24 per cent 
in one year, from 1945 to 1946, while four types of crimes — Criminal 
Homicide, sex offenses, drunkenness, and burgary — increased more 
than 500 per cent. 

THE REMEDY 

The remedy is total abstenance. Christians have always had one 
infallible authority to which they have gone to learn that certain 
human practices are evil in their very nature. For social guidance the 
Bible has always been their rule of faith and practice and their de- 
finition of right and wrong. 

"Look not thou upon the wine when it is red, when it giveth his 
color in the cup, when it moveth itself aright." (Prov. 23:31) 

"Woe unto them that rise up early in the morning, that they may 
follow strong drink; that continue until night, till wine enflame 
them." (Isa. 5:11) 

"Let us walk (Live) honestly, as in the day; not in rioting and 
drunkenness — not in strife and envying." (Rom. 13:13) 

WHO SHOULD TAKE THE LEAD 

If the combined religious forces" of the country would open up 
their artillery on this curse in our social order I have a hunch that 
things would happen fast. It is still true that "the liquor interests 
would destroy the Chdrch if they could; the Church could destroy the 
liquor business if it would." It is high time that the forces for righte- 
ousness become militant and aggressive in their fight against this great 
evil. I challenge you to do something about it. 

"If my people, which are called by my name, shall humble them- 
selves, and pray, and seek my face, and turn from their wicked ways; 
then I will hear from heaven, and will forgive their sin, and will heal 
their land." (2 Chron. 7:14) 

38. The Session adjourned to reconvene at 7:15 for the 
Evening Session. 

EVENING SESSION 

39. The Association reconvened for the Evening Session at 
7:15 with the singing of "All Hail the Power of Jesus' Name." 
Rev. J. Zeb Moss, Pastor of the Rawls Church lead the devotion. 

40. The Associational Missionary exhibited color slides of the 
various churches and numerous church groups in the Association. 

41. The report of Mrs. D. B. Andrews on Missions was pre- 
sented on her behalf by Rev. Forrest Maxwell. This report, as 
adopted reads as follows: 



'M LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 

REPORT ON MISSIONS 

The Advance Program goal set in 1948 is 1,750 foreign mission- 
aries and an annual budget of $10,000,000. Southern Baptists had 625 
missionaries on the foreign field and a budget of $3,782,800 at the 
beginning of 1948. At the beginning of 1952 we had 832 foreign mis- 
sionaries and a budget of $5,180,000. 

Since the beginning of 1948 our missionaries have entered sixteen 
additional countries. The newest field is Indonesia. Three former 
China missionaries landed on the island of Java on Christmas Day of 
1951 and in February this year vi^ere granted permission by the Min- 
istry of Religion in Indonesia to begin mission work. Other countries 
in the Orient entered since advance began are: Philippine Island, 24 
missionaries; Malaya, four; Thailand, 13 in the capital city; Formosa, 
15 in six centers; Korea, three in the city of Pusan. 

Most of this new work in the Orient has been projected among 
Chinese populations in those countries by China missionaries evacuated 
from China. For the first time in more than a hundred years we have 
no missionaries on the China mainland, although nine are in English 
Hong Kong and Portuguese Macao. However, the Orient staff has in- 
creased, during the years of advance, from 257 to 291. Most of the 
new missionaries are in Japan, where 82 are working in 13 centers 
(five of the centers opened in 1951; six more centers are assigned to 
missionaries now in language school). Others have gone in Hawaii, 
where 42 missionaries are located in seven centers. 

As many new countries have opened in Latin America as in the 
Orient. In South America are Venezuela, with three centers, and 
Ecuador and Peru with one each; in Central America are Costa Rica 
and Guatemala with one center each, and Honduras, to which mission- 
aries are under appointment; and a China missionary couple are in 
the Bahama Islands in an advisory capacity. 

Meanwhile, older mission areas in Latin America — Argentina, 
Chile, Colombia, and Brazil — have maintained their work. A great 
many new centers have been opened in Portuguese Brazil. The mission 
staff in Latin America has advanced from 237 to 346. 

Three other countries have been entered in other parts of the 
world. Medical personnel has been appointed for one of them, South- 
ern Rhodesia, where evangelistic work began in 1950. Lebanon, new 
field in the Near East, has evangelistic work and a school in Beirut. 
Opening of the Switzerland international seminary, where 39 students 
from twenty countries are enrolled this year, gives Baptists a new ap- 
proach to the mission task in Europe. 

Older mission fields in the Africa-Europe-Near East area also 
show advance. A second center was opened in the Gold Coast in 1951, 
and the Nigerian Mission is launching into its second century with 144 
missionaries in 19 centers. New ventures in the Near East include a 
co-operative farm in Israel and a hospital in Jordan. Work continues 



LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 35 

in Spain and Italy under the handicap of Catholic-controlled govern- 
ments. The missionary staff in the area advanced from 131 to 195. 

During the year 1951 the foreign mission fields reported a mem- 
bership of 189,225 in 1,913 organized churches. Missionaries also work- 
ed with 3,668 outstations, 22 medical units, 405 schools, five publica- 
tion houses, three orphanages, and seven good will centers. Among 
the results were 18,372 baptisms, 49,271 enrolled in schools, 6,865,372 
pieces of literature published, 99 orphan children cared for and 1,766 
people contacted in the good will centers. 

Southern Baptists are keeping up with foreign mission advance 
through The Commission, their foreign mission journal. It is recognized 
increasingly as an indispensable aid in being well informed about all 
of our overseas work. 

The 1951 foreign mission receipts from the Co-operative Program 
totaled $6,900,000. The Lottie Moon offering totaled $2,668,051.30. 

42. Mr. James W. Ray, State Baptist Student's Secretary de- 
livered an informative address on the advanced program in North 
Carolina. 

43. Upon motion of Rev. T. W. Williams, the Association 
\()red unanimously to hold the Spring meeting at the Lillington 
Baptist Church on a date to be fixed by the Executive Commit- 
tee of the Association. 

44. Ihe Neill's Creek Church choir rendered two musical 
selections, following which the report on Evangelism was pre- 
sented by Rev. Turner. His report as presented and adopted 
reads as follows: 

REPORT ON EVANGELISM 

Twenty-seven of the churches of this Association report 253 addi- 
tions to their membership by profession of faith and baptism, five of 
these churches report no baptisms during the year. Twenty-four of the 
churches report revival services held during the year. Three of the 
churches reporting no baptisms did not have revival services during 
the year. 

In addition evangelistic services have been held at the Johnson- 
ville Mission, the South Erwin Mission, and the Gourd Springs Church, 
resulting in 22 making confessions of faith and being baptized. 

In 1949 there were 338 baptisms reported. 

In 1950—339. 

In 1951—1184. 

In 1952—253. 

The large number in 1951 was a result of the Simultaneous Cam- 
paign. 

We humbly offer the following suggestions: 



36 LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 

(1) The ideal toward which our churches should work is that 
the Lord would add to the churches daily such as are being saved. 

(2) The churches in this section are not ready yet, if they evei 
shall be, to give up the practice of having special series of evangelistic 
services. 

(3) It would be profitable for us to have simultaneous evangelistic 
services in our Association every four or five years. 

(4) One of "the all things" Jesus commanded to be taught to every 
disciple was personal witnessing. 

(5) One of the evidences that a church is a Spirit filled group of 
Christian workers is a constant turning of the lost about them to the 
Lord. 

45. Dr. J. Winston Pearce, Pastor of the First Baptist Church 
of Dvuhani was presented by the Moderator and delivered an 
excellent address on the importance of Christian Homes. Follow- 
ing his address the Association adjourned. 



LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 37 



OUR BELOVED DEAD 



A.NGIER— Mr. Zebedee D. Overby 

ANTIOCH— Mr. W. H. Rogers, Deacon, Mrs. Cora Teague, Mr. C. W. 
Bayles, Mr, John David Stewart, Mrs. J. P. Sercey 

BAPTIST CHAPEL— Mr. Thadeus Thomas, Mr. N. M. Thomas 

BAPTIST GROVE— Mrs. Martha Jarman, Mrs. W. H. Lee, Mr. James 
Wheeler, Mr. W. D. Howell, Mr. G. F. Lewter 

BROADWAY— Mr. G. L. Stone, Deacon, Mr. J. B. Rosser 

CHALYBEATE SPRINGS— Mrs. F. D. Overby, Mrs. G. Scott Turner, 
Sr. 

COATS— Mrs. S. R. Moore, Mr. John Moore 

CUMBERLAND UNION— Mr. J. O. Weathers, Deacon, Mrs. J. 0. Weat- 
hers 

DUNN, FIRST— Mrs. R. B. Norris, Mr. Charles Lee Guy, Sr., Mr. Ben 
Parker 

DUNN, SECOND— Mrs. Lucille Pope 

ERWIN, EAST— Mr. J. J. Turnage, Mr. N. M. Harrell 

ERWIN, FIRST— Mr. N. R. Sanderman, Mr. Tom Johnson, Mr. C. W. 
Giles, Mrs. B. F. Aikin, Mr. Bernie Simmons, Mrs. Bertha Suggs 

FRIENDSHIP— Mr. W. H. Allen, Mrs. H. D. Byrd 

KENNEBEC—Mrs. Helen C. Dove, Mr. M. A. Thomas 

LILLINGTON— Mr. M. C. Wilder, Mrs. W. T. Simmons 

MACEDONIA— Mrs. Zelia Dennis, Mr. J. E. Griffin, Mr. J. E. Smith 

NEILL'S CREEK— Mrs. A. L. Johnson, Mrs. Cornelia Matthews, Mr. 
M. T. Williams 

OAK GROVE— Mrs. Brookie Butts, Mrs. Lily Cutts, Mr. A. H. William.s 

PINEY GROVE— Mr, John L. Goodwin, Mrs. Lillie Griffin. Mr. George 
T. Watkins 

RAWLS—Mr. F. L. Gotten 

SWANN'S STATION-^Mr. Lucian C. Lamm 



38 LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 

ORDAINED MINISTERS 

Name Address Church Membership Work 

J. L. Aikins, Raleigh, Rt. 4 Piney Grove Pastor 

J. E. Ayscue, Biiie's Creek Buie's Creek Retired 

A. Paul Bagby, Buie's Creek Buie's Creek Retired 

}. F. Blackmon, Buie's Creek Buie's Creek Retired 

W. T. Campbell, Fqy. Sprgs. Rt. 2 ....Neill's Creek Retired 

Clarence Lee Corbett, Jr., Dunn Dunn, First Lie. Pastor 

J. Ben Filer, Coats Goats Pastor 

C. T. Gray, New Hill, Rt. 3 New Hill Pastor 

R. F. Hall, Lillington Lillington Retired 

Johnnie A. Hilliard, Angier Kennebec Evangelist 

Julius Holloway, Lillington Lillington Assn. Mis. 

Charles B. Howard, Buie's Creek Buie's Creek Pastor 

Sam F. Hudson, Dunn Dunn Pastor 

E. Weldon Johnson, Buie's Creek Buie's Creek Pastor 

E. C. Keller, Dunn Dunn, Second Pastor 

Lester Mann, Durham, Rt. 1 Macedonia Pastor 

Forrest Maxwell, Erwin Erwin, First Pastor 

A. C. McCall, Bunnlevel Friendship Pastor 

Lucian Moody, Dunn Dunn, Second ....Ord. Min. 

Herman Moore, Jr., Clayton Cumberland Union ....Pastor 

Zeb Moss, Wake Forest Wake Forest Pastor 

Roy C. Parker, Buie's Creek Buie's Creek Lie. Pastor 

0. W, Pulley, Erwin Erwin, East Pastor 

Rudolph Pulley, Raleigh Raleigh Pastor 

C. E. Ruffin, Broadway Broadway Pastor 

E. P. Russell, Dunn Dunn, First Pastor 

Dr. L. C. Smith, Fqy. Spgs. Rt. 2 Chalybeate Spgs., Lie. Pas. 

1 hurman S. Smith, Fqy. Spgs. Rt. 2 ....Chalybeate Spgs., Lie. Pas. 

1. K. Stafford, Buie's Creek Buie's Creek Pastor 

Jrvin Stephens, Mamers Antioch Lie. Pastor 

G. Van Stephens, Angier Angier jPastor 

Fulton Thomas, Buie's Creek Oak Grove Pastor 

G. Scott Turner, Jr., Wake Forest ....Duncan Pastor 

G. Scott Turner, Sr., Kipling Chalybeate Spgs Pastor 

T. W. Williams, Lillington Lillington Pastor 

STUDENTS FOR THE MINISTRY 

Name Church School 

Tommie Canipe, Dunn, Second 

Clarence Lee Corbett, Jr., Dunn, First Wake Forest 

Bill Davenport, Buie's Creek Campbell 

Marion Elkins, Buie's Creek Campbell 



LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 39 



Earl D. Farthing, Dunn, First Wake Forest 

Alton Hayes, Bethel __ _ Campbell 

Bob Hunter, Buie's Creek .._ Campbell 

Lynwood Ragan, Piney Grove Wake Forest 

Samuel Stanley, Buie's Creek Campbell 

Truman Smith, Chalybeate Southeastern Seminary 

Mrs. Irvin Stephens, Antioch Campbell 

CHOIR DIRECTORS 

Church Name Address 

Angier Mr. Norman Matthews ....Rt. 1, Lillington 

Antioch Mrs. E. L. Powell Rt. 3, Lillington 

Baptist Grove Tyree Senter Fuquay Springs 

Bethel Leland Matthews Rt. 1, Linden 

Broadway H. A. Thomas - Broadway 

Buie's Creek David Smith _ ..Buie's Creek 

Chalybeate Springs ....Truman Smith Wake Forest 

Coats Mrs. F. H. Fleming Coats 

Duncan K. D. O'Connell Holly Springs 

Dunn, First Mrs. M. M. Jernigan Dunn 

Dunn, Second B. O. Slaughter .__ Dunn 

Erwin, East W. C. Stone Box 225, Erwin 

Friendship .Mrs. Archibald Byrd Bunnlevel 

Harmony H. S. Hedgpeth Rt. 1, Bunnlevel 

Holly Springs Willie Nordon Broadway 

Kennebec AVaymon Howard Rt. 2, Fuquay Spgs. 

Layton's Chapel Robert West _ _ .Rt. 1, Spring Lake 

Lillington Mrs. Ruth Brown .....Lillington 

Macedonia Leo Weathers Rt. 1, Holly Springs 

Neill's Creek ..Norman Matthews Rt. 1, Lillington 

Oak Grove O. G. Lamm Rt. 1, Coats 

Piney Grove R. E. Austin Rt. 1, Fuquay Spgs. 

Pleasant Memory S. W. Turlington Rt. 1, Lillington 

Rawls Mrs. Zeb Moss __Box 864, Wake Forest 

Swann's Station R. A. Wilson Sanford 

PIANISTS OR ORGANISTS . 

Church Name Address 

Angier Mrs. Mary Massey Angier 

Antioch Mrs. C. W. Kelly Rt. 3, Lillington 

Baptist Grove Mantie Lou Rogers Fuquay Springs 

Bethel Mrs. H. W Blalock ..Rt. 1, Linden 

Broadway Laura Rossir Broadway 

Buie's Creek Mrs. A. E. Lynch Buie's Creek 



40 LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



Chalybeate Springs —.Sue Smith .....Rt. 1, Fuquay Spgs. 

Coats -Mrs. D. H. Yarley Coats 

Cumberland Union ..Mrs. Thomas Sears Rt. 1, Fuquay Spgs. 

Duncan J. D. O'Connell Holly Springs 

Dunn, First Mrs. Charlie Upchurch Dunn 

Dunn, Second Mrs. D. H. Godwin Dunn 

Erwin, East Mrs. O. W. Pulley Erwin 

Friendship ..Mrs. Roy Jones Bunnlevel 

Harmony Mrs. G. R. Souders ..Lillington 

Holly Springs Dorothy Brown Mamers 

Kennebec Dwight Smith Rt. I, Varina 

Layton's Chapel Mrs. J. W. Fink Rt. 1, Spring Lake 

Lillington Mrs. Joe T. Long Rt. 1, Lillington 

Macedonia Helen Fay Truelove Holly Springs 

Neill's Creek Mrs. Alyda Smith Rt. 2, Angier 

Oak Grove Mrs. G. C. Denton Rt. 1, Lillington 

Piney Grove Mrs. John C. Adcock Holly Springs 

Pleasant Memory Mrs. Carlie McLamb Coats 

Rawls ...Mrs. Clinton Abernathy ...Fuquay Spgs. 

Swann's Station Mrs. Lonnie Taylor Sanford 

LIBRARIANS 

Church Name Address 

Antioch Georgia Lee O'Quinn Mamers 

Dunn, First Mary Edith Hackett Dunn 

Harmony Mrs. G. R. Sanders Lillington 

Holly Springs Ruth Patterson Broadway 



No. Known Roman 
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Number Tithers 



Revival Meeting-s 
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Grand Total 
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Total Resident 
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LITTLE RIVER 

BAPTIST 

ASSOCIATION 

North Carolina 



SEVENTY-EIGHTH ANNUAL SESSION 

Meeting With 

HOLLY SPRINGS BAPTIST CHURCH 
OCTOBER 27th, 1953 



The next regular session of the Association will meet with the 

Coats Baptist Church on Tuesday after the fourth 

Sunday in October, 1954. 

The annual sermon will be preached by Rev. Lester Marsh 
Rev. L. C. Pinnix, Alternate 



THE Mcculloch press 

Elizabethtown, N. C. 



LITTLE RIVER 

BAPTIST 

ASSOCIATION 

North Carolina 



SEVENTY-EIGHTH ANNUAL SESSION 

Meeting With 

HOLLY SPRINGS BAPTIST CHURCH 
OCTOBER 27th, 1953 



The next regular session of the Association will meet with the 

Coats Baptist Church on Tuesday after the fourth 

Sunday in October, 1954. 

The annual sermon will be preached by Rev. Lester Marsh 
Rev. L. C. Pinnix, Alternate 



INDEX 

Associational Directory 5 

Choir Directors 39 

Constitution 10 

Librarians 40 

List Of Messengers 8 

Our Beloved Dead 37 

Ordained Ministers 38 

Pianists Or Organists 39 

Proceedings Begin 12 

Program 12 

Statistical Tables Begin 41 

Students For The Ministry 38 

REPORTS: 

American Bible Society 30 

Associational Missionary 21 

Baptist Hospital 16 

Baptist Orphanage 15 

Baptist Training Union 29 

Brotherhood 20 

Christian Education 35 

Christian Literature 19 

Evangelism 34 

Executive Committee 24 

Relief And Annuity 17 

Resolutions Committee 28 

Sunday School 18 

Temperance And Civic Righteousness 31 

Time, Place And Preacher 28 

Treasurer 14 

Womens Missionary Union 34 

World Missions 32 




THE FOREST MAXWELLS 



LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



THE FOREST MAXWELLS 

One of the most loving husband and wife teams to be found is Forest 
and Rosalie Maxwell, born and reared in Hendersonville, N. C. Mr. Max- 
well is the son of William P. and Ella Huntley Maxwell. Mrs. Maxwell 
is the daughter of Jonathan and Julia Waters Case. They now have two 
sons, Abie Forest and Eddy Lee. 

Mr. Maxwell is a graduate of Wake Forest College with an A. B. Degree. 
He later entered and finished law at the Asheville University Law School. 
Upon hearing and surrendering to God's call to the ministry, he enter- 
ed the Southern Seminary at Louisville, Kentucky. Upon graduation with 
an B. D. degree was called to the First Baptist Chruch in Erwin, N. C. 

While in the Seminary Mr. Maxwell held two student pastorates, one 
in Quincy, Indiana, and the other in English, Kentucky. 

Although Mrs. Maxwell had no formal training for comradeship in 
her husband's new profession, her education being planned without the 
slightest hint of preparing herself to be a minister's wife, while at the 
Seminary and Training School, she took every advantage and opportun- 
ity to better equip herself for her new life's work. She has no regrets 
but rather moves in an atmosphere of joy and sincere devotion to the 
Master. 

It was only a short time after the Maxwell's came to Erwin in July 
of 1943 until they had won a definite place in the hearts of the Baptist 
people. From the very beginning they went to work in such a quiet, sin- 
cere, unassuming manner, and yet with such a positive approach it was 
most apparent that their pastorate would be a progressive one. 

Under their leadership the First Baptist Church of Erwin has grown 
in many ways. A beautiful auditorium which was built at a cost of 
$100,000 has been paid for in full. Recently the construction of a 
new $50,000 educational building was started. A mission was established 
at South Erwin, and has grown to the extent that it is now the South 
Erwin Baptist Church. 

Through the efforts of the Maxwells the budget of their church has 
reached an all time high. The membership has become more missionary 
minded both in works and in money given for this purpose. The Church 
now has a paid Organist and Minister of Music. 

Mrs. Maxwell is probably known best and loved most for her wonder- 
ful work as teacher of the Estherian Bible Class. For this alone she will 
be forever remembered. 

Along with an extremely busy schedule Mr. Maxwell found time sev- 
eral years ago to organize a Boy Scout Troop and served as Scoutmaster 
until a few years ago. He and he alone should be given credit for putting 
new life in the scouting program for our entire county. 

Both Mr. and Mrs. Maxwell are in much demand as speakers and as 
teachers for study groups throughout the Association. 

The people of the Little River Association and the people of Erwin, 
particularly, will always be grateful that these fine people saw fit to 
come to this community. 

A simple but meaningful description of Forest and Rosalie Maxwell 
would be "SINCERITY OF PURPOSE." 



LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



DIRECTORY OF THE ASSOCIATION 

I. GENERAL OFFICERS OF THE ASSOCIATION 

Moderator L. H. Campbell, Bute's Creek 

Vice-Moderator .. H. Paul Strickland, Dunn 

Clerk W. A. Johnson, Lillington 

Treasurer _. Berles Johnson, Lillington 

II. EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE MEMBERS 

Moderator L. H. Campbell, Buie's Creek 

Vice-Moderator H. Paul Strickland, Dunn 

Clerk W. A. Johnson, Lillington 

Treasurer Berles Johnson, Lillington 

S. S. Superintendent Roger Johnson, Lillington 

B. T. U. Director Lonnie Small, Buie's Creek 

W. M. U. Superintendent ___ Mrs. D. B. Andrews, Rt. 2, Fuquay Springs 

Superintendent of Evangelism Rev. G. Scott Turner, Lillington 

Brotherhood President Irvin Stephens, Rt. 2, Lillington 

Associational Missionary Julius Holloway, Lillington 

Rev. Forrest Maxwell Erwin 

Mr. D. B. Dean Lillington 

III. STANDING COMMITTEES 

Presbytery and Pulpit: 

Weldon Johnson Buies Creek 

Julius Holloway Lillington 

J. Ben Eller Coats 

G. Van Stephens Angier 

Chm. on Christian Literature Mrs. J. Ben Eller, Coats 

Chm. on Hospitals Dr. A. W. Peede, Lillington 

Chm. on Missions Mrs. Charles B. Howard, Buie's Creek 

Chm. on Temperance Rev. Forrest Maxwell, Erwin 

Chm. on Christian Education E. M. Walker, Buie's Creek 

Chm. on American Bible Society J. A. Senter, Lillington 

Chm. on Orphanage „. W. C. Stone, Box 223, Erwin 

Chm. on Baptist Homes Mrs. W. E. Nichols, Coats 

Chm. on Memorials Mrs. G. Van Stephens, Angier 

Chm. on Ministers' Annuity Dr. D. C. Woodall, Erwin 

IV. ASSOCIATIONAL MISSIONARY 

Rev. Julius Holloway Lillington 

V. W. M. U. ASSOCIATIONAL OFFICERS 

Superintendent, Mrs. D. B. Andrews, Route 2, Fuquay Springs 

Associate Superintendent 

Secretary-Treasurer Mrs. H. M. O'Quinn, Mamers 

Young People's Leader Mrs. Cliff Ammons, Lillington 

Royal Ambassador Leader 

Mission Study Chairman Mrs. G. Van Stephens, Angier 



6 LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 

Stewardship Study Chairman Miss Lillian Draughon, Rt. 5, Dunn 

Margaret Fund Chairman Mrs. L. B. Smith, Rt. 2, Fuquay Springs 

Training School Chairman Mrs. Forrest Maxwell, Erwin 

Literature Chairman Miss Zula Rogers, Mamers 

White Cross Chairman Mrs. A. C. Barefoot, Angier 

Community Missions Chairman Mrs. Milton Stevens, Angier 

VI. ASSOCIATIONAL SUNDAY SCHOOL OFFICERS 

Superintendent Roger Johnson, Lillington 

Associate Superintendent H. H. Hamilton, Lillington 

Enlargement Rev. E. P. Russell, Dunn 

Training Rev. G. Van Stephens, Angier 

Evangelism Rev. G. Scott Turner, Lillington 

Vacation Bible School Miss Vera Lee Thornton, Dunn 

Secretary 

Departmental Superintendents: 

Extension Mrs. Leslie J. Turlington, Buie's Creek 

Adult C. W. Flowers, Angier 

Young People Mrs. Henry Morgan 

Intermediate Miss Evelyn Straughon, Dunn 

Juniors Miss Zula Rogers, Mamers 

Primaries Miss Mamie Haighwood, Lillington 

Beginners Miss Ruby Williams, Buie's Creek 

Cradle Roll Mrs. Harvey O'Quinn, Mamers 

Nursery Mrs. C. D. Bain, Dunn 

Group Superintendents: 

No. 1 Dr. C. D. Bain Dunn 

No. 2 W. C. McLean Route 1, Varina 

No. 3 Leo Betts Duncan 

No. 4 John H. Morgan Route 2, Lillington 

No. 5 Eldon F. Sloan Broadway 

VII. ASSOCIATIONAL B. T. U. OFFICERS 

Director Lonnie Small, Buie's Creek 

Associate Director Mrs. E. L. Powell, Rt. 3, Lillington 

Secretary-Treasurer Miss Betty Williford, Buie's Creek 

Chorister Rev. L. C. Pinnix, Lillington 

Pianist Mrs. L. C. Pinnix, Lillington 

Pastor Advisor Rev. Lester T. Marsh, Mamers 

Department Leaders: 

Nursery . Mrs. Lonnie Small, Buie's Creek 

Primary Mrs. Thurman Collins, Mamers 

Junior Miss Bessie McNeill, Rt, 1, Broadway 

Intermediate Jack McCarty, Lillington 

Young People Mrs. H. T. Mangum, Rt. 2, Cameron 

Adult Miss Lilian Draughon, Rt. 5, Dunn 



LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



Group Leaders: 

No. 1 

No. 2 Mrs. Irvin T. Ellen Rt. 1, Willow Springs 

No. 3 

No. 4 Mrs. Henry M. Mangum Rt. 2, Cameron 

No. 5 Miss Emma Knight Rt. 1, Broadway 

VIII. ASSOCIATIONAL BROTHERHOOD OFFICERS 

President Irvin Stephens, Rt. 2, Lillington 

Advisory Committee E. C. Keller, Dunn; Forrest Maxwell, 

Erwin; G. Van Stephens, Angler. 

Program Vice President C. R. Ammons, Lillington 

Promotion Vice President Ellis C. Barbour, Dunn 

Membership Vive President Ellis Parker, Angier 

Secretary-Treasurer James B. Brown, Rt. 2, Lillington 



LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



LIST OF MESSENGERS 

ANGIER — J. Fred Hockaday, Marshall Morgan, Wayne C. Coats. 

ANTIOCH — James Brown, E. B. O'Quinn, Mrs. Pearl Brown, Mrs. Emily 
Thomas, Mrs. Alice O'Quinn. 

BAPTIST CHAPEL— Deas Dickens, Roland Howard, Miss Mamie Howard. 
BAPTIST GROVE- 
BETHEL— Leland Matthews, Mrs. Leland Matthews, Mrs. 0. L. Hamilton, 
James Flowers, Mrs. Beulah Matthews. 

BROADWAY— J. I. Pittman, Owen Taylor, Ralph Sykes, Leslie Pittman, 
Mrs. Leslie Pittman. 

BUIE'S CREEK— C. William Hart, Charles Taylor Edgerton, Worth Lan- 
ier, B. F. McLeod, Mrs. Alton Johnson. 

CHALYBEATE SPRINGS— E. W. Smith, G. R. Wells, Mrs. C. K. Smith, 
Mrs. D. B. Andrews, R. W. McDonald. 

COATS— Owen Odum, Mrs. Owen Odum, Clyde Grimes, Mrs. W. D. 
Moore, Mrs. T. O. Beasley. 

CUMBERLAND UNION— Mrs. Henry Farrell, Mrs. Cornelia Abernathy, 
Mrs. Annie Sears, Mrs. Thomas Sears, Glenwood Caviness. 

DUNCAN— E. J. Tutor, Mrs. Alta Yates, J. D. O'Connell, Mrs. W. M. 
Dennis. 

DUNN, FIRST— Miss Evelyn Straughan, Miss Lillian Draughon, H. Paul 
Strickland, Mrs. Locke Campbell, Mrs. Allen H. A. Lee. 

DUNN, SECOND— Mrs. Ernie Jackson, Mrs. J. W. Daniels, W. A. Ormand. 

EWWIN, EAST— Mrs. Stancil, Mrs. C. M. Baker, Mrs. W. J. Davis, Mrs. 
Cecil Baker, Mr. Stone. 

ERWIN, FIRST— 

ERWIN, SOUTH— Sylvester House, Mrs. Sylvester House, Mrs. Raymond 
Britton, Rev. Raymond Britton, Miss Delois West. 

FRIENDSHIP— Mrs. W. E. Bethune, Mrs. Charlie Strickland, Mrs. John 
Cannon, Mrs. Lelia Hobbs, Gerald Hobbs. 

GOURD SPRINGS- 
HARMONY— H. S. Hedgepeth, Raeford Smith, Ambrose F. Currin, Mrs. 
Claude R. Graham. 

HOLLY SPRINGS— C. J. Patterson, Otis Patterson, J. D. Patterson, A. L. 
Baker, D. P. Patterson. 

KENNEBEC— Thad Eastwood, Jasper Matthews, Conez McLean, Stamie 
McLean, Mrs. Edna Bowden. 



LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



LAYTON'S CHAPEL— J. H. Butts, Mrs. J. H. Butts, Mrs. L. K. Clark. 

LILLINGTON— J. A. Senter, Mrs. A. G. Rickman, Mrs. C. R. Ammons, 
Rev. L. C. Pinnix. 

MACEDONIA— Paul O'Connell, Roy Weathers, J. E. Holt, Mrs. S. M. 
Hobby, Mrs. Frank Smith. 

NEIL'S CREEK— W. T. Campbell, Reddin Wheeler, Mrs. J. O. McLeod, 
Stedman Ray, J. F. Sartin. 

OAK GROVE— Hugie Byrd, Garvie Benton, Mrs. Pearl Gaskin, Mrs. 
Hugie Byrd, Willie Ammons. 

PINEY GROVE— Roy Keith, M. D. Honeycutt, Earl J. Holleman, I. L. 
Howell. 

PLEASANT MEMORY— W. L. Franklin, Mrs. W. L. Franklin, Mrs. 
Carlie McLamb, Mrs. Hubert Reardon. 

RAWLS— Mrs. T. H. Gardner, Mrs. Callie Holleman, Mrs. 0. D. Sherman, 
Mrs. Rex Bradley, Mrs. Rufus Moore. 

SWANN'S STATION— Robert Godfrey, A. R. Batchelor, A. H. Sharpe, 
0. R. Link, Mrs. Lonnie Taylor. 



10 LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 

CONSTITUTION 

1. This association shall be known as "Little River Baptist Associa- 
tion." 

2. The object of this association shall be the advancement of the 
Kingdom of Christ, and the means of accomplishing this shall be in 
strict conformity with the principles of the New Testament. 

3. The association shall have no authority over the internal right of 
any church belonging to it and shall act only as an advisory council. 

4. The association shall be composed of messengers chosen by the 
churches connected with it, each church being entitled to five messengers. 
Ordained ministers having oversight of churches in the association, or 
having their membership in these churches, shall also be received as 
messengers. 

5. A quorum shall consist of messengers from a majority of the 
churches of the association. 

6. The messengers from each church to the annual meeting of the 
association shall bear a letter certifying their appointment and giving 
an account of the condition of the church and a statement of all funds 
contributed for local and benevolent purposes. 

7. The officers of the association shall be a moderator, a vice- 
moderator, a clerk and a treasurer, who shall be chosen annually from 
the members composing the association, and shall continue in office 
until their successors are elected. The term of office of the moderator 
shall begin at the conclusion of the session at which he is elected and 
continue until the close of the next annual meeting. 

8. It shall be the duty of the moderator to preside during the delib- 
erations of the body, to enforce the observance of the constitution, pre- 
serve the decorum, appoint committees except when other provisions 
are made for their appointment, decide all questions of order, giving his 
opinion on any question under discussion, and cast the deciding vote in 
case of a tie. 

9. It shall be the duty of the clerk to record the proceedings of each 
annual meeting of the association, superintend the printing of the min- 
utes and their distribution among the churches. 

10. It shall be the duty of the treasurer to receive all funds sent by 
the churches or collected during the sessions of this body and to disburse 
the same for the objects stated. He shall present a report on all funds 
administered by him at each annual meeting. 

11. The association shall appoint annually an Executive Promotion 
Committee of 12 members, among whom by virtue of their office are to 
be the moderator, vice-moderator, clerk-treasurer, S. S. Supt. of the 
Association, Training Union Director, W. M. U. Superintendent, Supt. of 
Evangelism, Associational Brotherhood president, and the Associational 



LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 11 

Missionary. This committee shall have general supervision of the affairs 
of the association during the interval between the meetings of the body; 
shall seek to promote the welfare of the churches, and their active par- 
ticipation in the causes fostered by the denomination; but shall be an- 
swerable ot the association for its acts, and make an annual report to the 
association of its work. The Executive Promotion Committee shall meet 
once each quarter and upon other occasions on the call of the moderator. 

12. The association in annual meeting shall appoint a presbytery of 
four members to sit with the pastor of any person whose ordination is 
sought, and the moderator of the association, to examine the qualifi- 
cations and opportunities for work of the candidate. 

13. The association shall hold an annual meeting commencing on 
Tuesday after the fourth Sunday in October. 

14. A meeting of the association may be called by the moderator 
at any time by the consent of five members of the Executive Committee. 
Each church shall be notified of such a meeting in time to send messen- 
gers. 

15. This association shall have the right to exclude from its member- 
ship any church that departs from New Testament principles. 

16. Any church desiring to become a member of this association may 
present a petition at the annual meeting of the body through messengers 
appointed for this purpose. If the association shall consent to receive 
such church the moderator shall extend the hand of fellowship to the 
messengers. 

17. The association may invite visitors to seats and extend to them 
all the privileges of the messengers except that of voting. 

18. By appointment, at each annual meeting, an introductory sermon, 
and a sermon or address on missions shall be delivered. 

19. This constitution may be amended at any annual session, by a 
vote of two-thirds of the messengers present, provided that notice shall 
be given in the morning session of the day on which such motion will 
be presented. 



12 LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 

PROCEEDINGS 
MORNING SESSION 

1. Moderator L. H. Campbell called the Association to order at the 
Holly Springs Church at 9:30 a. m. on October 27, 1953. The meeting 
opened with the singing of "I Love Thy Kingdom Lord," lead by Rev. 
L. C. Pinnix, Chorister for the Session. 

2. Rev. Lester Marsh, pastor of the Antioch Baptist Church, lead the 
devotion which consisted of reading several verses from John 4 and a 
prayer by Brother Marsh. 

3. Following the singing of "I Need Thee Every Hour", Rev. C. E. 
Ruffin, pastor of the host church, extended a welcome to all in attend- 
ance. 

4. In accordance with the constitution, notice was given that the 
question of amending the constitution to insert the word "Messengers" 
in lieu of the word "delegates" and to make the Associational Brother- 
hood President a member of the Executive Promotion Committee would 
be presented at the afternoon session. 

5. The clerk called the roll of the churches of the association and 
all except the Erwin First Church answered. Thereupon the moderator 
announced that a quorum was present and upon motion duly made and 
seconded, the session voted unanimously that the official messengers 
present should constitute the Seventy-Eighth Session of the Little River 
Baptist Association. 

6. The moderator extended a welcome to six representatives from 
the Hillmon Grove Church, and the Associational Missionary presented 
the petition of said church for admission to the Association. The mod- 
erator referred this petition to the committee on New Churches. 

7. At the request of the Moderator the Associational Missionary 
presented Rev. Lester Marsh and Rev. L. C. Pinnis as the new pastors in 
the Association. Numerous other visitors from Baptist churches and 
institutions were recognized by the Moderator. 

8. The program for the meeting was presented by the moderator and 
upon motion duly made and seconded such program, which is as follows, 
was adopted: 



PROGRAM 

LITTLE R5VER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 

(Seventy-Eighth Session) 

Holly Springs Baptist Church 

October 27, 1953 

Theme: 

"PLANNING FOR '54" 



LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 13 

MORNING SESSION 

9:30 — Hymn, Scripture and Prayer Lester T. Marsh 

9:45 — Organization and Business 

Recognition of New Pastors and visitors. 
Treasurer's Report 
Appointment of Committees. 
10:05 — Planning for '54: An Adequate Social Service Program. 

10:05 North Carolina Baptist Orphanage — _ Mrs. Alton Johnson 
Baptist State Convention Representative 

10:20 North Carolina Baptist Hospital A, W. Peede 

Baptist State Convention Representative 

10:35 North Carolina Baptist Homes Mrs. Willie Lou McLamb 

Baptist State Convention Representative 

10:50 Minister's Annuity Mrs. C. W. Hart 

10:55 — Planning for '54: An Informed Church Membership 

10:55— "A Million More in '54" Truby Powell 

Baptist State Convention Representative 
11:10 Christian Literature for Everybody — _ Mrs. Perry Langston 
Baptist State Convention Representative 
11:25 — Announcements and Congregational Singing 

11:30 — Planning for '54 The Advance Program — Baptist State Convention 
Representative. 

12:00— Annual Sermon J. Ben Eller 

12:30 — Adjournment fo lunch. 

AFTERNOON SESSION 

1:30 — Hymn, Scripture and Prayer J. L. Atkins 

1:40 — Memorials Mrs. Forrest Maxwell 

1:50 — Planning for '54: Christian Stewardship Horace Easom 

2:10 — Planning for '54: A Brotherhood for your Church. Irvin Stephens, 

Horace Easom. 
2:25 — Planning for '54: A Progressive Associational Program. 

2:25 Report of Moderator L. H. Campbell 

2:40 Report of Associational Missionary Julius Holloway 

2:55 Report of Executive Committee H. Paul Strickland 

3:10 Open Discussion 
3:40 Business. 

Report of Committees 
Nominations 
4:10 — Adjournment until evening session. 
Budget 

Time, Place and Preacher 
Resolutions 

EVENING SESSION 

7:00 — Hymn, Scripture and Prayer W. L. Davenport 

7:10 — Planning for '54: Training in Church Membership^ Lonnie Small 

7:15 — Planning for '54: American Bible Society Mrs. T. L. Caviness 

7:20— Planning for '54: Temperance and Civil Righteousness E. Weldon 

Johnson, W. P. Biggerstaff 



14 LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 

7:50 — Planning for '54: World Missions Mrs. Donald Moore 

Report of W. M. U Mrs. D. B. Andrews 

Report on Evangelism G. Scott Turner 

Address J. B. Hipps 

8:30— Planning for '54:Our Colleges A. R. Burkot 

Carlyle Campbell 
9:00 — Adjournment. 

9. The moderator recognized Berles C. Johnson for his report as 
Treasurer of the Association. The report as presented and adopted is as 
follows: 

TREASURER'S REPORT 
Report of Berles C. Johnson, Treasurer of Little River Baptist Assoc- 
iation Missions and Minute funds (October 15, 1952 through September 
30, 1953.) 

Balance in Bank of Lillington, October 15, 1952 $ 51.89 

Receipts: 

Angler 289.92 

Antioch 305.68 

Baptist Grove 67.82 

Baptist Chapel 21.48 

Bethel 25.00 

Broadway 5.80 

Buie's Creek 256.19 

Chalybeate Springs 64.32 

Coats 192.26 

Cumberland Union 3.97 

Duncan 5.00 

Dunn, First 925.00 

Dunn, Second 12.91 

Erwin, First .-... 320.35 

Erwin, East 39.96 

Friendship . . 127.03 

Gourd Springs 

Harmony 60.74 

Hillman Grove 32.45 

Holly Springs 100.00 

Kennebec 7.00 

Layton's Chapel 10.00 

Lillington 430.20 

Macedonia 63.63 

Neil's Creek 150.97 

Oak Grove 118.02 

Piney Grove 105.00 

Pleasant Memory 5.00 

Rawls 34.86 

Swan's Station 45.65 

South Erwin 10.00 

Baptist State Convention 1,169.00 



Total Receipts $5,071.10 



LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 15 

Expenditures: 

Associational Missionary Salary $2,563.00 

Associational Missionary Expense 1,500.00 

Royal Typewriter Co 32.50 

Pope Printing Co. 440.00 

Various Office Supplies 119.82 

Guthrie Colvard (travel to association) 14.00 

Vacation Bible School Expense 27.25 

Total Expenditures $4,696.57 

Balance in Bank of Lillington, Oct. 1, 1953 $ 192.53 

Deposited in Bank of Lillington Oct. 3, 1953 and 

received during last days of September $ 182.00 

Total receipts in Bank of Lillington and cash on hand 

Oct. 1, 1953 $ 374.53 

Total receipts in Bank and expenditures during 

Association year $5,071.10 

Respectfully submitted, 
Berles C. Johnson, Treasurer 

10. Following the adoption of the Treasurer's report, the Moderator 
appointed the following committees: 

A. Committee on nominations and officers: 

Julius Holloway, Chairman, Rev. G. Scott Turner, Rev. Forrest 
Maxwell, the Associational Sunday School Superintendent, the 
Associational Training Union Director, and the Associational 
Brotherhood President. 

B. Committee on Time, Place and Preacher: 

E. Weldon Johnson, chairman, W. M. Morgan and Mrs. W. D. 
Moore. 

C. Budget Committee: 

H. H. Hamilton, Chairman, Berles Johnson and L. H. Campbell. 

D. Committee on Resolutions: 

E. C. Keller, Chairman, J. L. Atkins and Mrs. Rex Johnson. 

E. Committee on New Churches: 

J. Ben Eller, Chairman, S. D. Gregory and Lester T. Marsh. 

F. Committee on Constitution: 

W. A. Johnson, Chairman, L. C. Pinnix and E. P. Russell. 

11. Mrs. A. G. Johnson gave a report on Baptist Orphanages, and her 
report as presented and adopted reads as follows: 

REPORT ON THE BAPTIST ORPHANAGE 

The past year has been a good one for the Baptist Orphanage in North 
Carolina. 

The greatest building and remodeling program in its history has been 
promoted with the result that a new cottage, new print shop and a new 
infirmary has been completed and early in the year the I. G. Green 
Recreational Building was finished. A beautiful new church that will 
seat nearly six hundred people will be finished this fall, while some of 
the old cottages have been remodeled, making these good living quarters 



16 LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 

for the children. 

During the year the orphanage ministered to 728 children while the 
social service department helped to adjust 214 others with relatives and 
boarding homes. 

Twenty-four graduated from high school last June; eighty professed 
faith in Christ and were baptised. 

Let's put the Orphanage and its needs in our hearts and make the 
Thanksgiving offering the biggest in our history, remembering the words 
of our Master, "In as much as ye have done it unto one of the least of 
these my brethren, ye have done it unto me." 

Respectfully submitted, 
Mrs. Alton G. Johnson 

12. Dr. A. W. Peede delivered the report on the Baptist Hospital, and 
his report, which was adopted, reads as follows: 

BAPTIST HOSPITAL REPORT 

On May 2*8, 1923 the North Carolina Baptist Hospital admitted its first 
patient. Since that date literally thousands of sick, injured and crippled 
have received aid and comfort. This work is increasing each year in the 
number of patients admitted, in the high type of service rendered and 
in the relief of suffering humanity. We can justly feel proud of the 
hospital personnel and the gracious Christian atmosphere in the in- 
stitution. 

Many patients are admitted each year who are without funds with 
which to meet the necessary costs of treatment, medicine, etc. These 
are met by annual collections of Mother's Day and these collections, as 
far as they go, are used to defray expenses of those persons unable to 
pay for themselves. 

Offerings for the N. C. Baptist Hospital for the year ending September 
30, 1953 are as follows: 

MOTHER'S DAY OFFERING 
Church New Wing 

As Of September 30, 1953 

Angier $ 311.00 

Antioch $ 56.60 634.00 

Baptist Chapel 25.00 111.50 

Baptist Grove 128.99 

Bethel 40.00 

Broadway 125.00 

Buie's Creek 66.73 200.68 

Chalybeate Springs 95.09 395.00 

Coats 123.08 412.15 

Cumberland Union 28.50 51.00 

Duncan 55.55 

Dunn, First 2,461.33 

Dunn, Second 53.30 

Erwin, East 50.00 77.85 

Erwin, First 269.79 353.35 



LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 17 

Erwin, South 10.00 

Friendship 27.61 311.82 

Gourd Springs 10.00 

Harmony 18.00 144.20 

Hillmon Grove 25.89 

Holly Springs 68.76 147.81 

Kennebec 16.38 25.00 

Layton's Chapel 122.25 

Lillington 150.00 811.14 

Macedonia 25.03 74.00 

Neill's Creek 69.27 142.36 

Oak Grove 148.88 

Pleasant Memory 27.00 

Rawls 77.06 

Piney Grove 34.85 164.75 

Swan's Station 60.21 160.33 



Total $1,230.79 Total $7,767.30 

Respectfully Submitted, 
Dr. A. W. Peede 

13. Following the presentation of the hospital report, and after some 
discussion. Rev. E. P. Russell moved that Dr. Peede's suggestion that 
every church take a Mother's Day offering for the hospital be referred 
to the Resolutions Committee. This motion was duly seconded and 
unanimously adopted. 

14. Thereupon the Moderator recognized Brother Everette Brenard, 
a representative from the Baptist Hospital, and Brother Brenard spoke 
briefly on the outstanding work being done by that institution. 

15. No report on the Baptist Home for the Aging was available for 
presentation to the Association. However, Brother Keller spoke briefly 
on the financial support of the Home. Following the remarks by Brother 
Keller, the Moderator recognized Mr. Sloan Guy, representative from 
the Home, who gave a summary of the work carried on by the Home and 
the plans for expanding the services rendered by this institution. 

16. Brother A. C. McCall presented, in the absence of Mrs. C. W. 
Hart, the report on Ministers Annuities, Mrs. Hart's report was adopted 
as presented and is as follows: 

THE RELIEF AND ANNUITY BOARD REPORT 

The Minister's Retirement Plan is the method of our denomination 
for taking care of its retired and disabled ministers. The cost of the plan 
is as follows: The pastor pays 4 per cent of his salary; his church pays 
4 per cent of his salary; the Convention adds to that amount. 

The ever-increasing load on the Relief Department of the Relief and 
Annuity Board has become a cause of deep concern for the Relief and 
Annuity Board and for the state secretaries. With so many pastors re- 
tiring who have never joined the plan and asking to be placed on the 
relief roll, the problem has become acute. As a result, a drastic change 



18 LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 

in policy was passed on by the Board during the Southern Baptist Con- 
vention this year. After December 31st, pastors in active service who 
refuse to enter the Minister's Retirement Plan will no longer be eligible 
for assistance from the Relief Department. The denomination must have 
the cooperation of the pastor and his church. 

At lease half of the churches and pastors in the Little River Association 
are not members of the Plan. Every one of these churches should enter 
the Plan and urge its pastor to enroll without delay. 

For further information about the Plan and application blanks, write 
to Dr. M. A. Huggins, 119 Hillsboro Street, Raleigh, N. C. 

Respectfully submitted, 
Mrs. C. W. Hart 

17. In the absence of the Associational Sunday School Superintend- 
ent, Brother J. A. Senter presented his report. The report as presented 
and adopted reads as follows: 

THE ASSOCIATIONAL SUNDAY SCHOOL REPORT 

The Associational Organization has held four general and officers 
meetings this year, One Vacation Bible School Clinic, and one special 
planning meeting for "A Million More in '54". A number of other meet- 
ings have been held for this special effort to enroll in our Sunday Schools 
"A Million More in '54." Two departmental conferences were held. 

Vacation Bible Schools outstripped all records last year so far as I 
can find. Gifts to missions, $347.22. Of this amount $220.15 was given 
through the cooperative Program. A total of 3,235 were enrolled and of 
these 155 were not in Sunday School. We need to enroll these as a part 
of our goal for the "Million More in '54," The Associational goal is 1,450 
or 20 per cent of the Sunday School enrollment. Last year's enrollment 
was 7,248. During the year 1951-1952 we gained only 120 in enrollment. 
We will have to go some if we reach 1,450. We can do it if we all get at 
it, and stay at it. We need to seek the last one. 

We recommend this year: 

1. A complete census, kept up to date. 

2. A Systematic program of visitation in Christ's Name. 

3. A Christian Home for every child. 

4. A January Bible study Week in each church using the book, 
"Studies in Psalms." prepared by Dr. Kyle M. Yates. 

5. Group training schools for workers with every church cooperating. 

Find the people who are not in Sunday School, make room for them 
teach them the Word, win them to Christ. Think of it! 1,450 people added 
to our Sunday School enrollment in Little River to help us tear down 
the strongholds of sin and satan, and to help make the Kingdom of 
this world become the Kingdoms of our Lord and His Son, Jesus Christ. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Truby Powell, Associational S. S. Supt. 



LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 19 

18. Mr. C. W. Bazemore was recognized by the Moderator and com- 
mented briefly on Sunday School work. 

19. Mrs. Perry Langston gave the report on Christian Literature, 
upon which Brother C. W. Bazemore also commented. Following the 
presentation of her report and the remarks of Brother Bazemore, said 
report was unanimously adopted in the following form: 

CHRISTIAN LITERATURE REPORT 

Surely there is something significant in the fact that the first book 
printed on John Gutenberg's press was the Bible. Since its beginning, 
the printing industry has been closely associated with Christian litera- 
ture. However, there is a tendency today to allow un-Christian influences 
to enter this field. 

There is much bad reading material on our newsstands today. Some- 
body reads the stuff. As Marse Grant, editor of theCharity and Children, 
suggested in a recent issue of that paper, it is time for Christian people, 
who believe they have something better to offer, to launch an offensive. 

As Baptists, and especially North Carolina Baptists, we can place be- 
fore oar people — regardless of age — a v/ealth of attractive and helpful 
Lte^ature published by our own denomination. 

These you see here this morning should be in every Baptist home. 
We have two of the very finest papers — the Charity and Children and 
the Bibical Recorder. Without these papers we just can't keep up with 
what is going on in our state. As the Recorder puts it, this is "the only 
means of promoting all Baptist work in every home each week." 
We have two fine periodicals presenting our entire mission program 
each month — The Commission and Southern Baptist Home Missions. 
The Commission is $1.00 a year and the Home Missions is 50c a year. 
The Commission is worth its price to me for the Missionary Family 
Album section. Through this we can keep up with who is home on 
furlough, who has a new baby, who is being sent to a new field and we 
can see the pictures of the new appointees. 

We have two periodicals closely associated with building a Christian 
home. Both of these can be used for family worship periods. Open Win- 
dows is entirely a devotional booklet. Usually each week's theme is pre- 
pared by a different writer. Each quarter this periodical comes to us 
with contributions from outstanding religious leaders. 

Home Life is what the title suggests — a family magazine. It is one of 
the finest publications I know of. It includes inspirational, entertaining, 
and informative articles each month. It is included on our regular litera- 
ture order blank and can be ordered by your church each quarter. If 
you do not already use this plan, perhaps you would like to order as 
many copies as you think your membership would use when you send 
in your next order about the end of November. 

In addition to the periodicals mentioned, the Broadman Press, operat- 
ed by our Sunday School Board, publishes many highly readable books. 
These are advertised through our various periodicals and in the Master 
Key. Our people should know about these and be encouraged to pur- 
chase some of them or borrow them from our church libraries 



20 LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



There is much we can do to make known to our people what is avail- 
able in good reading. We have a definite responsibility in this field of 
service. Let's do something about it. 

Respectfully submitted 
Mrs. Perry Q. Langston, Chairman on Christian Literature 

20. Brother Pinnix lead those present in singing "Come Thou Fount". 

21. The Moderator recognized Brother Earl Bradley who delivered an 
inspiring address on the advance program. 

22. The Moderator had a copy of the Recommendations of the Ex- 
ecutive Committee presented to those present following which the group 
sang "Rescue the Perishing." Rev. E. Weldon Johnson read several verses 
of scripture from John I and Mr. and Mrs. L. C. Pinnix sang a duet. 

23. The moderator recognized Rev. Eller for the annual sermon. Bro- 
ther eller delivered an inspiring message based on verses 41 and 42 of 
John I. 

24. The Morning Session concluded with prayer by Brother Eller and 
those in attendance adjourned to the Sunday School Annex of the host 
church where a bountiful lunch, prepared by the host church was en- 
joyed. 

AFTERNOON SESSION 

25. The Association reconvened for the Afternoon Session at 1:45. 

26. The Session opened with the singing of "Onward Christian Sol- 
diers", following which Rev. J. L. Atkins lead the devotional. 

27. At the conclusion of the opening devotion, the Moderator turned 
the chair over to H. Paul Strickland, vice-moderator. 

28. The vice-moderator recognized Brother Forrest Maxwell, who con- 
ducted a memorial service which consisted of reading the names of 
members of the churches who had died in the past year, with appropriate 
comments. At the conclusion of his remarks, the Messengers stood in 
silence for one minute and Brother Maxwell lead the group in prayer. 

29. The vice-moderator recognized Brother Horace Easom who read 
several passages of Scripture and then delivered an excellent address 
on Stewardship. 

30. Irvin Stephens presented the Brotherhood Report and Brother 
Easom commented briefly thereon. Following the comments of Mr. 
Easom, the Brotherhood report was adopted. This report is as follows: 

BROTHERHOOD REPORT 

The Brotherhood organization is still young. We have not known too 
much about what to do. We had one Associational meeting at Buie's 
Creek with 86 men present. We hope to have four this year. At present 
we have six brotherhoods and one Junior Brotherhood. 

The men of our churches have stayed in the background long enough. 
The Brotherhood organization has a place for every man's ability re- 
gardless of the size of his talent. As men we need to find that place. "The 
reason a lot of people think they have lost religion is they keep it hidden 
most of the time." The Brotherhood provides a means of Christian 



LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 21 



fellowship among the men of the churches to promote the causes of the 
church, Association and the denomination. 

We hope that we can report 30 Brotherhoods at our next Annual 
meeting. The Associational Brotherhood officers are ready to help any 
way they can. 

Respectfully submitted, 
Irvin Stephens, Associational Brotherhood President. 

31. The Moderator announced that he did not have a written report 
to make and thereupon the Associational Missionary was called upon 
for his report. His report as presented and adopted is as follows: 

ASSOCIATIONAL MISSIONARY REPORT 

It is with grateful hearts that we look back on our past years work. 
You, the churches and individuals in Little River, have helped graciously 
with the work. Your kind words of criticism, encouragement, and cheery 
"Hello" have inspired your leader to go on. All your contributions, money 
and otherwise, have helped greatly, for which I am thankful. The support 
of the work this year year has been better than last. 

As of October 1st all bills which had been presented were paid with a 
$192.53 balance in treasury. All of the churches but 2 have contributed 
to the Associational Mission fund. 

One of our wishes for next year is that all the churches support 
financially this program. We need a sound projector in the Association 
in order that we might show sound films and appeal through the eye and 
ear for the need of our world for Christ. If the churches who gave a 
little would have given more, and the churches who gave nothing would 
not have robbed God in this field we could have bought a projector. 
We are not fussing but to be progressive and to do our share of the 
work the Master left in our hands, we must lead to bigger and more 
noble things. The compassionate heart of God and the pull of the peo- 
ple for a better way of life demands our attention now. Now is the only 
time we have. Tomorrow will be too late for our generation. Now is 
God's time. God has promised, if we will bring in the tithes he would 
open the windows of heaven and pour out a blessing that there would 
not be room to receive it, and He said also that he would rebuke the 
devourer for our sakes and He would not destroy the fruit of our ground. 
Do we want a blessing? Do we want the devourer rebuked? Bring in the 
tithes. 

Your Missionary has visited every church in the Association this year 
and presented some phase of our work. Much of my time has been spent 
at the Johnsonville mission, which has been organized into a church. 
On May 11, 1952 we started a Mission Sunday School with 17 present 
at 3:00 P. M. At 7:30 P. M. we had 34 present for worship service. The 
Sunday School enrollment reached 72 by the last Sunday in May this 
year. The worship service attendance increased also until the two-room 
tenant house was swelled to the point of discomfort. A committee of 
Otha Mangum, Simon Campbell, Jim Anderson, Ed Gilchrist and Macy 
Douglass was appointed to locate a building site. Two places were re- 
ported. The one the two-room house was on and the one the new build- 






22 LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 

ing is now located on near Mangums pond. This site was chosen by the 
people. A building committee of Otha Mangum, Brussel Johnson and 
Simon Campbell was appointed. The land was cleared, timber cut and 
the building erected. A survey was made and the results showed 100 
people above the age of ten with Baptist preference, 39 of these were 
displaced Baptists; 60 were not members anywhere but gave Baptist pre- 
ference. 

On June 7, 1953 a meeting of interested persons was held at the 
newly constructed but incomplete house of worship. The purpose of the 
meeting was the organization of a Missionary Baptist Church. All visiting 
deacons and ordained ministers of this denomination who were present 
were asked to serve as a council, and the following were present and 
served in that capacity: Mr. L. H. Campbell, President of Campbell Col- 
lege and Moderator of Little River Baptist Association; G. Scott Turner, 
pastor of Chalybeate Springs and Neil's Creek churches; W. R. Upchurch 
and W. F. Howard, Deacons of Kennebec Church; S. D. Gregory, Deacon 
of Neill's Creek Church; G. Scott Turner, Jr., Pastor of Duncan Church; 
B. E. Lucas, Pastor of Gourd Springs Church; D. J. Patterson and R. V. 
McNeil, Deacons of Holly Springs Baptist Church. Other churches rep- 
resented were, Antioch, Lillington and Swann's Station. L. H. Campbell 
was elected Moderator of the council and G. Scott Turner, Sr., Secretary. 
Rev. Julius Holloway, Missionary of Little River Baptist Association, pre- 
sented the needs for a church in the Johnsonville community and re- 
ported on the work that was already being done there. 

The following motion was made by R. V. McNeill and seconded by G. 
Scott Turner, Jr., "I move that this council recognize the need for a 
church in this community and that we help the interested parties to or- 
ganize such." The motion was passed by a unanimous vote of the council. 

The Moderator invited all present interested in the formation of a 
church and desirous of being members to present themselves and their 
credentials. The following responded: Otha Mangum, Mrs. Otha Mangum 
Mr. and Mrs. C. T. Jackson, Mr. and Mrs. Clayton Taylor, Mr. and Mrs. 
Andrew Taylor, Mr. and Mrs. Bussel Johnson, Mr. and Mrs. Simon 
Campbell, Mr. and Mrs. E. J. Gilchrist, Mary Sue Gilchrist, Mr. and Mrs. 
Henry Mangum, Billy, Elizabeth and Willa Jean Campbell, Mrs. Mack 
Douglas, Mr. and Mrs. J. R. Anderson, Joyce Mangum, Ray Johnson, Lewis 
Wayne Tew, Johnnie Ray Howard, Wayne Mangum, Mrs. D. A. Clark, 
Joyce Wilson, J. C. Wilson, J. L. Thomas and Mrs. H. L. West. 

The following motion was made by J. R. Anderson, seconded by E. J. 
Gilchrist, "I move that we organize as the Hillmon Grove Missionary 
Baptist Church, and that those presenting themselves at this time and 
those who are awaiting Baptism and expect to present themselves for 
membership be recognized as charter members." This motion was 
carried by a unanimous vote. The following persons were then elected 
as officers of the Hillmon Grove Baptist church: Church Clerk and Treas- 
urer, Mrs. Brussell Johnson; Sunday School Superintendent, C. T. Jack- 
son; Deacons: Otha Mangum, Brussell Johnson and J. R. Anderson. Trust- 
ees: Simon Campbell, Brussell Johnson, and Clayton Taylor. 

The Baptist articles of Faith, Church Covenant and rules of church 



1 



LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 23 

decorum were adopted by the new church. These had been previously 
studied under the leadership of the Associational Missionary. 

The hand of fellowship was given to the members of the new church 
by the moderator, the members of the council, and many others. 

In addition to the foregoing here are some of the other things you have 
helped your Missionary do: 

1. Filmstrips shown, 31. 

2. Sermons in regular worship or special service, 50. 

3. Study courses taught, 16. 

4. State, regional and rural church meetings attended, 11. 

5. Spoke on "A Million More in '54" 21 times. 

6. Spoke on Missions 18 times. 

7. Visits to churches not for special services, 31. 

8. Brotherhood meetings attended, 10. 

9. Cottage prayer meetings held, 10. 

10. W. M. U. Meetings attended, 12. 

11. B. T. U. meetings attended, 15. 

12. Sunday School meetings attended, 13. 

13. Spoke at prison camp, 4 times. 

14. Funerals conducted, 3. 

15. V. B. S. worked in, 10. 

16. Services to ordain deacons, 4, 

17. Officiated at Lord's Supper, 4 times. 

18. Served on committee to organize church, 1 time. 

19. Led singing in revivals, three weeks. 

20. Preached in revivals, two weeks. 

21. Morning Devotions on WCKB, two weeks. 

22. Spent one week at Caswell with Associational Missionaries of State. 

23. Attended State and Southern Baptist Conventions. 

24. Held 775 individual conferences, 37 group conferences, and served 
on 38 committees. 

25. Letters and cards written and mailed, 1,156. 

26. Bulletins published and mailed, 3,720. 

27. Conducted "Religion In The News" WCKB each Saturday morning 
at 8:30. 

28. Wedding ceremonies performed, 2. 

29. Baptisms performed, 2. (There were 17 candidates.) 

30. Miles traveled, 22,601. The trip to Texas, Southern Baptist Con- 
vention, included. 

31. Telephone calls made and received, 225. 

Some of the things we would like to see done in our Association next 
year in all of our churches will be presented in another report. 

Respectfully submitted, 
Julius Holloway, Associational Missionary 

32. Upon motion of Brother Eller, duly seconded, the Association 
voted unanimously to express our confidence and give our prayers and 
support to the Associational Missionary. 

33. The Vice-Moderator returned the chair to the Moderator who 



24 LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



thereupon called upon the Vice-Moderator to read the report of the 
Executive Committee. Following the reading of this report, considerable 
discussion was had with respect to the same and several changes were 
suggested. The report of the Executive Committee, as amended and 
adopted by the Association, reads as follows: 

REPORT OF EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

The Executive Committee hereby proposes the establishment of cer- 
tain Associational goals, toward which our group efforts may be directed. 
Superior work on the part of our several churches in striving toward 
these goals shall be recognized annually by designating such churches as 
"Churches of Honorable Achievement." The purpose for designating such 
churches, the manner in which the churches of honorable achievement 
shall be selected, and the goals by which all churches shall be guided 
and toward which they shall strive shall be as follows: 

I. Purposes for establishment of Churches of Honorable Achievement. 

To develop more efficient, more active church organizations and 
to promote better the cause of Christ in the world, beginning at 
home, by focusing attention upon the best in church administration 
and by inspiring us to greater achievement through team work. 

II. Bases for the Selection of Churches of Honorable Achievement. 

1. Every church should be judged by its efforts to serve in its 
own local setting, regardless of whether it be rich or poor, large 
or small, rural or urban. 

2. A church is not to be judged so much upon its present stand- 
ard of perfection as upon its efforts to reach higher standards, 
based upon its willingness to study and learn. 

3. These bases for measurement should be such that every church 
in the Association may have an equal opportunity to win distinc- 
tion. 

III. Steps to Achieve Recognition. 

1. The Executive Committee, acting as a whole or by the appoint- 
ment of a smaller group, shall provide each church with adequate 
printed announcements containing the established principles and 
rules constituting the bases for this special recognition. This com- 
mittee shall, through the Associational Missionary, educational in- 
stitutions, the rural church department of the convention and print- 
ed sources, offer guidance to the churches for making surveys here- 
in below referred to. 

2. The Executive Committee, or a small group named by them, 
shall prior to the next meeting of the Association, canvas the re- 
ports submitted by the several churches, as a basis for consider- 
ation, and shall recommend at our next annual meeting those en- 
titled to approval by this body. 

3. As early in the year as possible each church should hold a 
church clinic, with the principal church officers and boards in- 
cluded. It is strongly urged that each church take advantage of the 
supervision and assistance of the Associational organization as 
needed, studying among other things the following: 



LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 25 

1. A study of local community and church needs to form the basis 
for the adoption of a church program for the coming year. Con- 
sideration should be given to the following vital areas of human 
activity. 

(A) Need for wholesome recreational and cultural entertain- 
ment to supplant questionable and degrading amusement now 
supplied for private gain, 

(B) Need for urgent physical and health assistance, whether on 
part of individuals or larger groups. 

(C) Need for religious visiting to reach the unchurched, not now 
identified with our educational, training and worship programs. 

2. A canvass of our church membership to discover available work- 
ers capable of supplying needed service in Christ's name. Each 
church should have as its ultimate goal: Every church member 
engaged in some area of church service. 

3. An outline of procedures and training practices needed to de- 
velop highest efficiency in this program. 

4. A survey of the church's educational and training program. 

5. An examination of its financial program. 

6. A prayerful consideration of the missionary efforts of the church. 
4. As a basis for continuing from year to year on the honor roll, evi- 
dence must be available that a church keeps this survey of the scope 

of its Christian opportunity up to date. 

IV. Genera! Principles for Guidance. 

We shall be guided in our recommendation for selection of a 
Church of Honorable Achievement by the following considerations: 

1. A church should produce evidence that it is faithfully endeavor- 
ing to respond to the needs of its local community as revealed in 
the clinical study. 

2. It must show responsiveness to the world-wide appeals for 
Christian service by support, through our denomination, of the 
cooperative program. 

3. It should seriously undertake the education and training of its 
constituency in Sunday School, Training Union, Woman's Mission- 
ary Union and Brotherhood. 

4. It should sponsor mission study through such organizations as 
the Woman's Missionary Union and the Brotherhood. 

5. A church should, as evidence of its evangelistic spirit, conduct 
at least one series of evangelistic services a year. 

6. The responsibility for supporting a local church program and 
the propagation of Kingdom work abroad should be met by the 
adoption of approved business methods. 

7. A church should encourage the reading of good religious period- 
icals and literature by sponsoring subscriptions to our several 
denominational publications or by including them in the church 
budget. 

8. Highest efficiency in the promotion of Christ's work requires that 
a church provide for itself in so far as possible an adequate plant, 



26 LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 

including Sunday School and Training Union facilities. The church 
building and its surrounding grounds should receive perpetual 
sanitary care and beautification. 

V. Specific Goals. 

1. Each church should meet the following requirements: 

1. The church should employ either a full-time pastor or form with 
a neighboring church a field, with the pastor living among his peo- 
ple. 

2. The pastor should attend, with fair regularity, our monthly 
meeting of ministers and the Association-wide meetings, including 
essential meetings of our church organizations. In so far as pos- 
sible, he should be enabled to attend our State and Southern con- 
ventions, and promotion meetings. 

3. The pastor should receive, on the basis of the proportional share 
of his time employed by a church, for himself and family, enough to 
live on comfortably, so that his time and thought can be given 
to his mniistry. 

4. He should be employed on indefinite call, instead of by the 
year. 

2. Church Organizations: 

1. A church should plan for such organizations and agencies as are 
needed to carry out most efficiently the program outlined in its 
goals for the year. 

2. Each organization should strive to meet those standards set up 
for it by our denomination. For instance, a Sunday school should 
show satisfactory progress toward the Standard of Excellence. 

3. Periodic revisions should be made in church rolls and efforts 
made to induce non-resident members to affiliate with other 
Baptist churches in their locality. 

4. A religious census should be taken periodically to reveal those 
unenlisted in the local area; follow-up enlistment efforts should be 
made. 

5 The several major church organizations should maintain monthly 

workers' Conferences. 

6. Each church prepare annually a calendar of events. 

3. Study courses, training programs, and worship. 

In order that the membership in our churches shall be informed 
concerning the religious needs in the world and become better 
trained workmen, a church should, upon the basis of its needs, con- 
sider among others, the following training courses. 

1. Training schools for officers in the several church organizations. 

2. Mission study courses. 

3. Stewardship week, to be observed annually. 

4. Institutes or conferences on church music. 

4. Financial Program. 
1, Each church should adopt at the beginning of its fiscal year a 



LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 27 

worthy budget representing a proper balance between local needs 
and world wide denomination causes. 

2. This budget should include support of Associational missions. 

3. In preparation for meeting this budget and to pave the way for 
growth in giving, instruction as to current financial needs and the 
principles of Christian stewardship should be stressed. 

4. Every church should follow this preparation period by calling 
upon all to pledge a worthy share in meeting the budget. 

5. Each church should, as soon as possible, organize and promote a 
tithers' club. 

6. Business meetings should be held at least quarterly, in which 
reports of current income and other business matters should be 
discussed in a democratic way. 

7. Wherever possible each church should include in its program a 
midweek prayer service. 

34. Brother Russell gave the report of the committee on the con- 
sitiiution which report recommended that the word "Messengers" be in- 
serted in lieu of the word "Delegates" and that the Associaitonal Bro- 
therhood President be made a member of the Executive Committee. This 
report was unanimously adopted and the Constution, as thereby amended, 
appears in these minutes on pages 10 and 11. 

35. Brother Eller presented the report of the Committee on New 
Churches, which committee unanimously recommended that the petition 
of the Hillmon Grove church for admission to the Association be granted. 
Upon motion duly made and seconded the report of this committee was 
adopted and the Moderator extended a warm welcome to this church. 

36. Brother H. H. Hamilton presented the report of the Budget Com- 
mittee. The report of this committee as presented and adopted reads as 
follows: 

REPORT OF BUDGET COMMITTEE 

We recommend the following budget for the Little River Association 

for the year 1953-54. 

Missionary: 

Salary of Missionary $ 2,700.00 

Travel Expense 1 ,200.00 

Housing SOO.OO 

Retirement 96.00 

Printing and Supplies 300.00 

Movie Projector 350.00 

General: 

Expenses of Associational Officers $ 150.00 

Printing and Distribution of Minutes 350.00 

Clerk 50.00 

Total Budget $ 6,066.00 

We recommend that every church be requested to give 3 per cent 



28 LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 

of its budget, exclusive of the Building fund, for Associational Missions. 

Respectfully submitted, 

H. H. Hamilton 

L. H. Campbell 

Berles C. Johnson 

37. Rev. E. Weldon Johnson presented the report of the Committee 
on Time, Place and Preacher. This committee recommended that the 
Annual October Meeting be held on October 26, 1954 in the Coats Baptist 
Church and that the Annual Sermon be preached by Rev. Lester Marsh 
with Rev. L. C. Pinnix as alternate. The committee also recommended 
that a Spring meeting be held at some church to be later determined on 
April 13, 1954, the sermon for that session to be preached by Rev. E. 
Weldon Johnson with Rev. Forrest Maxwell as alternate. This committee 
further recommended that the Associational Meetings be so arranged 
as to eliminate Evening Sessions and the program divided between the 
Spring and Fall meetings. Brother Johnson stated that the committee 
felt that such a plan would eliminate the burden of requiring the host 
church to provide an evening meal and that better participation in the 
work of the Association would also result from this plan. In this con- 
nection Brother Johnson pointed out that emphasis should be placed on 
providing an inspirational meeting in the Spring and that the program 
could be so arranged as to allow adequate time to consider all business 
and other matters which needed to be presented to the Association. 

Upon motion duly made and seconded, the report and recommendations 
of this committee were unanimously adopted. 

38. Brother Keller presented the Report of the Committee on 
Resolutions in the following form: 

Be it resolved that: 

1. The members of the Little River Association meeting with the 
Holly Springs Church on October 27, 1953 express their sincere thanks 
to the pastor and members of the host church for their most cordial 
hospitality and the excellent meal. 

2. The Association express its appreciation to the program committee 
for the fine program which has been arranged for the meeting. 

3. Each church in the Association be requested to take an offering 
on Mother's Day for the support of the Baptist Hospital. 

4. The Executive Committee of the Association provide directions for 
presenting reports to the Associational Meetings on the various phases 
of work carried on by the churches of the Association. 

Upon motion duly made and seconded, this report was unanimously 
adopted. 

39. Thereupon, upon motion duly made and seconded, the Session ad- 
journed to reconvene at 7:00 p. m. for the Evening Session. 

EVENING SESSION 

40. The Evening Session convened at 7:00 p. m. with the singing of 
"Footprints of Jesus", following which the Moderator lead the Session 
in Responsive Reading No. 535 in the Broadman Hymnal. Brother Ruffin 



LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 29 

then lead in prayer. 

41. Brother Holloway presented the report of the Nominating Com- 
mittee. His report as presented and adopted appears as the Directory of 
the Association, pages 5-7 of these minutes. 

42. Brother Lonnie Small presented the Training Union Report. His 
report as presented and adopted reads as follows: 

TRAINING UNION REPORT 

Again this year a survey of our work at the end of the year reveals 
many of our objectives unreached, but in spite of this, we had an en- 
couraging year and accomplished many things apart from the planned 
program. Four executive committee planning meetings and three assoc- 
iational mass meetings were held, and were well attended. I will refer 
to two of them. The "M" night mass meeting held in the Buie's Creek 
Baptist Church was a great success with approximately 375 in attendance 
At this meeting we mobilized to launch our new year program. The 
showing of an interesting film strip on the theme for the year, "Learn 
From Me," attracted a great deal of interest. This was a two hour pro- 
gram which closed with a challenging message, entitled "That All 
May Learn" brought by Rev. E. Weldon Johnson of Buies Creek. 

The most inspiring of the associational mass meetings was held in the 
Lillington Baptist Church on the night of April 13. At this time repre- 
sentative groups from the churches entering the Training Union Pro- 
motional Contest presented themselves, and winners were chosen to 
represent the association in the regional Training Union Convention at 
Oxford. We were represented at the regional convention by winners in 
the adult Bible Readers Contest. The Young Peoples Speakers Contest, 
The Intermediate Sword Drill, The Junior Memory Work, and the Hymn 
Festival. Our Juniors and Bible Readers leader won at the regional con- 
vention and we are proud to report that they later were declared win- 
ners at the state-wide meeting held at Fort Caswell. We were particularly 
proud of the choirs that participated in the Hymn Festival. Honor is due 
Miss Evelyn Straughan of the Dunn First Church and Mrs. S. David 
Smith of the Erwin Church for their work with the Junior and Inter- 
mediate Choirs. We extend our appreciation to all the other splendid 
leaders who worked with the other groups. 

Several new unions have been organized, most of these in new church- 
es. The new union at Kennebec, which we previously reported on, con- 
tinues to do good work. We are particularly proud of the newly organ- 
ized union in the new church at Hillmon Grove. They now have a mem- 
bership of 79. Special honor for this fine work is due Mrs. H. T. Mangum 
who serves as their Training Union director. 

The union at Antioch Church with its nearly 200 members, in mem- 
bership, and in activity is rated as one of the best unions in the state. 

From recent reports we can assure you that there is a great training 
grogram being conducted in many of our churches, particularly on a 
local church level. The associational officers feel that the local church 
unions should cooperate better in their attendance on the associational 
wide meetings. The most recent reports show considerable increase in 



30 LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 

membership in the Dunn First Church, the Buie's Creek Church and at 
Antioch. Nearly all of the churches have held Fall Study Courses. Space 
does not permit further details of our activity. 

In cooperation with the program known as a "Million More in '54" our 
theme for the new year will be "Keeping the Faith". We hope to have 
a large representative group from every church when we launch this 
program December 7, at the Lillington Baptist Church. The Training 
Union will cooperate wholeheartedly with the "Million More in '54" 
program. 

The Training Union is the church at work. Therefore, our purpose for 
next year is to reach and teach every available person in the community. 
There is a place for everyone in the Training Union. We will endeavor 
to get behind the Pastor, the Sunday School, the W. M. U., the Brother- 
hood, the Preaching Services, the Mid-Week Prayer Service, and all the 
other church activities in their all-out effort to reach a million more. We 
pledge ourselves to form prayer groups and visitation groups within the 
unions to help with the revivals and the visitation program of the church. 
We will make ourselves available to help any church in the organizing and 
setting up of a Training Union program. We covet your prayers as the 
basis of beginning an enlarged program. 

Sincerely in His Name 
Lonnie D. Small, Training Union Director 

43. Mrs. T. L. Caviness presented the report of the American Bible 
Society. Her report as presented and adopted reads as follows: 

REPORT OF THE AMERICAN BIBLE SOCIETY 

We aren't distributing just a certain assemblage of paper, ink, thread 
and cloth but the Spirit of God. He has chosen this book as one of the 
greatest instruments of His power. 

Many illustrations and figures might be given to portray the progress 
of the Society during 1952 in its four-fold program. 

First — In Translations: The Society furnished Bibles in more than 150 
languages and dialects. It assisted the Korean Bible Society to produce 
new editions in the Hankul spelling; 300,000 copies are being used as a 
text in Korean schools. 

Second — In Publications: Its services for the blind have been the larg- 
est in over a century of service. There were new publications during the 
year in German, Turkish and Armenian Braille. For the first time the 
worldwide Bible Reading Bookmarks have been published in Braille. It 
exceeded any previous year in embossed volumes and talking book re- 
cords. 

Third — In Distributions: It surpassed every year but one at home and 
abroad by circulating Bibles, Testaments, and portions totaling 13,369,030. 
The American Bible Society delivered 1,800 copies of Scripture every 
hour of every day to places where desperately needed. 

Fourth — In Promotion of Usage: The aim has constantly been to en- 
courage wider use of the Bible as a source of inspiration, guidance and 
self-help with the hope that many will be won to faithful, regular soul- 



LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 31 

feeding on the eternal words of Scripture. It has seen a continuing in- 
crease in observance of worldwide Bible Reading from Thanksgiving to 
Christmas with 12 per cent more orders for materials. 

Only by the gifts of men, women and children individually and through 
their churches can the Society continue to make the Book of Books avail- 
able to all the peoples of the world in their own languages and dialects. 

Did your church have a part? Did you? 

The labors of the American Bible Society to win souls to Christ and 
to faithful reading of the Book of Hope must never be allowed to grow 
less. "May God continue to bless and increase the reading of His Word." 

Respectfully submitted, 
Mrs. T. L. Caviness 

44. Rev. E. Weldon Johnson presented the report on Temperance. 
Following the presentation of his report, Mr. W. P. Biggerstaff, Associa- 
tion Executive Director of the Allied Church League spoke on the work 
of that organization. At the conclusion of his remarks, the report of 
Brother Johnson was adopted in the following form: 

REPORT ON TEMPERANCE AND CIVIC RIGHTEOUSNESS 

Terms Of Expression 

The Webster's Collegiate Dictionary gives a definition of temperance. 
The definition is as follows: "Habitual moderation in the indulgence of 
the appetites or passions; moderation; specifically; moderation in, or 
narrowly, abstinence from the use of intoxicants." Now, it is the word 
"narrowly" at which we should look for a moment. If it is narrow to 
hold total abstinence before our people as an ideal, then we should wear 
the badge proudly. It is, after all, probably a mistake that we do not use 
the word "abstinence" more often in speaking of the liquor problem, 
for this is certainly what we would desire for our people. Civic right- 
eousness, that is, righteous citizens, are more likely to be developed 
among people who refrain altogether from the use of intoxicating drink. 

The Problem 

We might say that the problem of liquor is that is causes crime, di- 
vorce, and degration leading to loss of self-respect and respect for 
other people. It is not rather that liquor further corrupts the inside of 
an already corrupted and sinful person? It brings out of that person only 
the worst in undesirable conduct, lack of control and courage to do right. 
In short, liquor makes a man a blocked channel, impervious, to some de- 
gree, to the Grace of God. 

Of course it is easy for us to point to the increasing crime rate and 
the amount of money spent for intoxicating drink as the prime con- 
sideration. We may exert all of our energies in compiling and reporting 
statistics such as the fact that approximately 10 billion dollars is spent 
annually for liquor and much more for its companion evil, gambling. 
We may also point out that people are consuming liquor at the rate of 
approximately 31 gallons of alcoholic beverages per capita annually in 



32 LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 

America, the highest rate ever. Along with the increase in alcohol con- 
sumption goes a comparable increase in moral degeneracy, for which 
liquor is responsible. 

But it is an inside problem that we face. Samuel Zane Betten in If 
America Fail, a book of several years ago, says, "Nations are not de- 
stroyed by causes from without; they perish from causes within. Nations 
do not die; they commite suicide." Possibly the greatest threat to us in 
America is alcohol. It makes the inside of a nation or a man weak and un- 
clean. It is the person who is weak and unclean on the inside who is most 
likely to become its slave. 

The Road To Relief 

There appears to be little hope for us to overcome the threat of al- 
cohol and attendant evils as long as we put our sole trust in legal means 
and regulations. Dr. J. B. Weatherspoon and others in the "Report of 
the Social Service Commission" to the Southern Baptist Convention, said 
"The education of our people from babyhood to the grave on the insidious 
evils of drink is necessary to any adequate solution. As convictions are 
formed against it we must devise methods of action to drive this flagrant 
evil from us ... " 

We must think in terms of the primary task of the Church. We must 
lead people to seek the Kingdom of God and His righteousness. The 
inside of the cup must first be cleansed. We must preach a gospel of 
moral and spiritual regeneration and of judgment. Our task is to work 
toward the building of Christian character and then these things, the 
external conditions, will be added — not without our efforts, mind you, 
but by the best efforts we can offer and the Grace of God. Liquor, 
gambling, and crime are the demons that tremble in the presence of 
Christ Jesus, and they will not be found to rule where a people are de- 
dicated to His Service. The alcoholic somehow believes that life is un- 
bearable without drink. The genuine alcoholic does not know real life 
in its fullness. Jesus said, "I am come that ye might have life and have 
it more abundantly." Herein lies our challenge. 

Respectfully submitted, 
E. Weldon Johnson. 

45. In the absence of Mrs. W. D. Moore, the Clerk read her report 
on World Missions, This report as presented and adopted, reads as fol- 
lows: 

WORLD MISSIONS REPORT 

In view of the fact that the 1954 plans of the Foreign Mission Board 
were not discussed publicly, nor passed upon until the October meet- 
ing of the Board less than three weeks ago, I am not in a position to 
report on the prospects for the coming year, except as various items 
from these plans have been published recently in the Commission. 

First and most important in the Foreign Mission Board's future plan- 
ning was the election of a successor to Dr. Rankin; as most of you already 
know. Dr. James Baker Couthern was the man selected. Dr. Couthern, 



LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 33 

whom the Orient Missionaries came to know well during the recent 
Communist advance in China is, in our opinion, a great leader, and a 
man entirely dedicated to carrying on the business of the great com- 
mission. 

One of the problems facing the Foreign Mission Board now is the 
annual one of taking in enough money not only to advance, but